GUANO

Grenfell

Upper

Atmosphere

Near space

Observatory

Grenfell Campus, Memorial University of Newfoundland,
Corner Brook, Newfoundland, Canada

 
Home
Background
The Program
The Payload
Launch
Flights
GUANO 1
GUANO 2
Latest

Physics@Grenfell

GUANO-3: A successful third flight

The third GUANO payload was launched on the morning of April 27 by the SNAP students into less than ideal weather conditions. The skies were very much overcast with the threat of rain and the wind gradually rising, so the decision was made to use the smaller 350 g sized balloon .

The usual on-board instruments measured temperature, pressure, humidity, and a Geiger counter measured cosmic rays; these readings were transmitted to a receiver on the ground. The high wind seemed to adversely affect the reception however, and many breaks in the data were recorded during the flight. Finally, after three hours, and at a last reported altitude of 24 km, the signal could not be regained.

There is very little change in the number of cosmic rays recorded until about an altitude of 5 km (5000 m), then from 5 to 17 km the CR counts increase at a more or less constant rate. The GUANO 3 count rate is relatively constant from 18 km to its maximum height of 24 km, as expected; this seems to be the peak region for the creation of secondary CRs. The "turn-over" seen in the GUANO 2 data, where the total number of cosmic rays begins to decrease, is not until about 26 km. This region represents heights where the CRs counted are more and more primary CRs, and fewer secondaries.

A comparison of this graph to the GUANO 1 and 2 results shows similar count rates at similar altitudes.