CO 194/87 [Reel B536]

Page

Date

From Whom(Where)

To Whom(Where)

Contents of Document

Newfoundland 1834: Vol. 2
January to June

Sir Thomas Cochrane

3

16 Jan 1834

T. Cochrane, Governor

E.G. Stanley, Secretary of the Colonies

Cochrane informs Stanley that he is returning several unanswered dispatches received between January 1st and June 30th 1833.

5-8

Various

-

-

Attached: The aforementioned dispatches, containing unanswered correspondences.

9

16 Jan 1834

T. Cochrane

E.G. Stanley

Cochrane transmits a copy of dispatches sent to the Colonial Department during the year 1833.

11-16v

Various

-

-

Attached: The returned dispatches from January 1st to December 31st 1833.

17

31 Jan 1834

T. Cochrane

E.G. Stanley

Cochrane sends the Returns of the Fishery and Inhabitants of the Colony and the Returns of the Imports and Exports for the year up to July 1st 1833.

19-21

-

-

-

Attached: The Returns of the Fishery and Inhabitants and the Returns of the Imports and Exports.

22-25

31 Jan 1834

T. Cochrane

E.G. Stanley

Cochrane informs Stanley that the documents finalizing the transfer of several pieces of land to the Board of Ordnance are ready to be sent. However, Cochrane feels it necessary to inform Stanley of the circumstances of the transfer in the hope that he will qualify Goderich’s direction.

26

23 Mar 1834

[???]

-

The details of this hastily-written document are difficult to decipher. The author appears to be requesting information from Stanley about a paragraph regarding the claims of Mr. Elliot.

28-31v

21 Jan 1834

Col. Hedfield

T. Cochrane

Hedfield’s report to Cochrane, stating his opinion of the proposed site of a new jail and penitentiary near Fort Townshend. Hedfield describes the state of the defenses around St. John’s. He expresses concern that the encroachment of buildings around Fort Townshend will lessen the security of the town.

32

31 Jan 1834

T. Cochrane

E.G. Stanley

Transmits the minutes of the the Council, as well as a Return of Members, to Stanley for the first half of the year.

34-35v

1 Feb 1834

T. Cochrane

E.G. Stanley

Mentions the complaints of French fishermen, whose boats and equipment are frequently stolen or destroyed following their departure at the end of season. Suggests the French fishermen be granted licenses to leave small crews in settlements during the winter for the safe-guarding of their assets.

36-37

26 [March?] 1834

-

-

Attached: A letter received by Cochrane complaining of ongoing transgressions against the assets of French fishermen in Newfoundland; postscript dated 2 Apr 1834 indicates that a copy of Cochrane’s despatch has been forwarded to the Foreign Office

38-38v

-

-

-

Attached: A copy of a proclamation by Cochrane denouncing the theft and destruction of French fishing equipment. The governor threatens the perpetrators with prosecution by British and French authorities.

40

3 Jul 1834

T. Cochrane

E.G. Stanley

Asks that Stanley request another warrant from the Lords Commissioners of the Treasury for the appropriation of customs duties to pay public officers because the previous warrant has expired.

42-45v

18 Feb 1834

T. Cochrane

E.G. Stanley

Informs Stanley that the House of Assembly has asked that he [Cochrane] present a request to the Imperial Parliament for financial aid to the colony upon his arrival in England. Expresses doubt about the practicality of having a legislature in the colony given the poverty of the populace. Regrets that the state of the colonial finances will prevent him from repaying the Parliamentary grant. Blames, in part, increased judicial expenses.

46-46v

-

-

-

Attached: The address of the House of Representatives of the Island of Newfoundland to the King and Imperial Parliament requesting financial relief.

48-49v

29 Mar 1834

-

-

A hastily-written note commenting on the claims and statements of the Assembly’s address to the Imperial Parliament and on the state of the colonial finances.

50-51

-

-

-

This document is a hand-written copy of the aforementioned address, dated 17th February 1834.

52-58v

15 Mar 1834

T. Cochrane

E.G. Stanley

Claims several judges have overstepped their authority in the prosecution of a murder and arson case in Harbour Grace in which one perpetrator was executed and the other given respite. States that the matter should have been represented to him by the judges in question. Mentions another case, the murder of Mr. Snow in Port de Grave, in which the justices showed preferential treatment at the urging of Roman Catholic clergymen in the execution of two male perpetrators.

60-63

14 Jan 1834

Judges Boulton, Brenton, and Archibald

T. Cochrane

Attached: The judges’ report to Cochrane detailing the results of the trials of Mr. Gray’s murderers, Malone and Downing, and of complications regarding the sentencing of Malone.

64-71v

15 Mar 1834

Judge James Simms

J. Crowdy, Colonial Secretary

Gives his opinion regarding the aforementioned trial of Malone and the respite given him following his confession to his jailer. Discusses the events of the murder in detail.

72-73

2 Apr 1834

T. Cochrane

E.G. Stanley

Informs Stanley of a third murder case, of which he knows very little. Encloses copies of letters from Chief Justice Boulton and the Attorney General.

74-74v

31 Jan 1834

Judge Boulton

T. Cochrane

Attached: Copy of Boulton’s letter to Cochrane outlining the death sentence and subsequent respite of Joseph Haskell – a "half Indian" – for the murder of Edward Power. Boulton’s letter describes the late presentation of evidence which indicated Power’s death was natural and not violent.

76-81

29 Mar 1834

James Simms

J. Crowdy

Attached: The Attorney General’s account of the case against Haskell and Fitzgerald for three murders. As above, the letter makes specific mention of the "half Indian" ancestry of the accused.

82

3 Apr 1834

T. Cochrane

E.G. Stanley

Transmits the Legislative Council’s address to the King.

84-93

19 March 1834

Henry Boulton for the Legislative Council

the King

The Council’s address, raising concerns about "the extremely embarrassed condition" of Newfoundland’s finances as it embarks down the path of representative government; Council requests Imperial assistance, pointing out that British colonies elsewhere in North America and Africa receive grants and subsidies. Newfoundland "is and ever shall remain a mere fishery" [87v]; agriculture "can under no circumstances ever become more than an auxiliary to the fishery" [88]. Council then discusses some of the limitations of agriculture. "It is therefore obvious that her population can never be reasonably expected to increase far beyond what the fisheries will afford employment for." Council also points out that Newfoundland doesn’t even have full control over its fisheries,, having to share them with France, which "has exclusive right along a most valuable part of our Coast..." Adding to the unfairness is that, while Newfoundland fishermen may not fish on the French Shore, the costs of any judicial procedures involving serious crimes like murder committed on the French Shore must be born by Newfoundland.

94-95

19 March 1834

Henry Boulton for the Legislative Council

the King

This is another copy of the same address. This one however was written on much wider sheets of paper (hence, far fewer pages) and the contrast is sharper for reading, but the width means that the line won’t fit on the screen of the microfilm reader.

96-98v

7 Apr 1834

T. Cochrane

E.G. Stanley

Informs Stanley of the objection of the Importers of Spirits to the duties imposed by the recent act of the Imperial Parliament. Regrets the passing of the Revenue Bill by the Assembly despite recommendations that the Assembly work within the framework of the recent act. Notes that funds for the payment of official salaries will not be available until the coming weeks.

100-100v

Aug 1834

-

T. Cochrane

The unidentified author informs Cochrane that provisions are being made to the Customs Bill correcting a loophole by which Newfoundland customs duties which were once due to the Empire have become colonial duties. Cochrane is also informed that the Treasury Warrant he requested is already en route to him.

102-103v

28 Feb 1834

James Simms

J. Crowdy

Gives his opinion on the controversy of customs duties on spirits and wines. Attests that the duty is valid and that the whole duty payable is six-pence per gallon. Notes that while the duty may be levied by colonial authorities, it must be paid to the Treasurer or Receiver General of the colony.

104-104v

10 Mar 1834

T. Cochrane

-

Discusses the confusion regarding the reserve funds arising from the recent Act of the Imperial Parliament. Anticipates amendments to the Act in the near future.

106-111v

8 April 1834

T. Cochrane

E.G. Stanley

Informs Stanley of the current state of affairs in the colony of Newfoundland. Notes the receipt of an address from a group of inhabitants petitioning for the dissolution of the Assembly. Recalls agitation for the formation of a Legislature in previous years by Dr. Carson and the Catholic bishop of the colony, and their present involvement in the petition to dissolve the Assembly. Notes the slanderous nature of Carson’s newspaper, "The Patriot."

112-112v

-

-

-

A note concerning the petition by inhabitants of St. John’s to dissolve the newly-elected House of Assembly.

114-115v

8 Apr. 1834

J. Stephen

R.W. Hay

Outlines the arguments and positions of the petitioners to Hay. Agrees with the petitioners on the point that members may not be elected to the Assembly who have not resided in the colony for at least two years, but disagrees on other points. Considers the petition "mis-stated and erroneous."

116-120

March 1834

-

-

Attached: The petition of the inhabitants of St. John’s to Governor Cochrane, in which it is alleged that certain members serving in the House of Assembly are doing so illegally. The petition recommends the dissolution and subsequent re-election of the Assembly.

121

27 Dec. 1833

-

-

Attached: "Copy of Resolutions passed at a meeting of certain Inhabitants of the town of St. John’s held at the Orphan Asylum on Friday the 27th Decem. 1833," at which Dr. Carson was chairman. Resolves, among other things, to denounce the presence of "a large military force" in St. John’s, and to voice support for Bishop Dr. Fleming, the bishop of St. John’s.

122-123v

28 Dec 1833

-

-

Attached: The written record of nine resolutions passed by the aforementioned group of inhabitants at their subsequent meeting.

124-126v

8 Jan 1834

J. Crowdy

William Carson, M.D.

Informs Carson that he has transmitted the resolutions to Cochrane. Expresses Cochrane’s view that the meeting facetiously claimed to represent the inhabitants of St. John’s, and that its resolutions were based on a desire to discredit his government.

127

4 Apr 1834

Simms

J. Crowdy

Attached: An excerpt from a letter to Crowdy from the Attorney General, in which Simms states that no sufficient grounds for dissolving the House of Assembly were contained in the petition.

128-128v

3 Dec 1833

Timothy Hogan

The Independent Electors of St. John’s

Attached: Announces his retirement from the electoral contest following the threatening endorsement of his opponent by Bishop Fleming. States that he is unwilling to oppose the bishop and will move aside in favour of his opponent.

129-129v

7 Mar 1834

Timothy Hogan

Doctor Fleming

Attached: Apologizes to the bishop for the comments contained in his address of 3 December 1833, which were deemed insulting or injurious to the Catholic faith.

131-134

1 May 1834

T. Cochrane

E.G. Stanley

Outlines and encloses copies of past correspondences with Lords Goderich and Howick regarding the military security of St. John’s. Explains his handling of the recent civil disturbance.

135-137v

17 Sept 1832

T. Cochrane

P. Maitland

Attached: Transmits a statement of the strength of the colonial garrison. Comments that the garrison is under-strength given the territory and population it is tasked with defending.

138-139

9 Oct 1832

T. Cochrane

Viscount Goderich

Attached: Complains of the state of the colonial garrison. Notes that had the original plan for the creation of a Newfoundland corps been adequately fulfilled, the garrison would be sufficient. Requests that Goderich forward his request for soldiers to the concerned parties.

140-141

20 Nov 1832

Viscount Goderich

T. Cochrane

Attached: Confirms the receipt and consideration of Cochrane’s letters. Informs Cochrane that he will do his best to divert efficient soldiers to Newfoundland, but recommends a militia and constabulary be established instead. Reminds Cochrane that use of the King’s forces should be reserved for emergencies.

143-143v

10 May 1834

T. Cochrane

E.G. Stanley

Informs Stanley that an act of the local Legislature and Assembly has abolished the Labrador court over which Captain Paterson presided. Requests that Stanley notify Paterson, who is on leave in England, that he need not return to Newfoundland.

145-145v

12 May 1834

T. Cochrane

E.G. Stanley

Notifies Stanley that he has refunded two allowances received after having been informed by Goderich of the cessation of such allowances. Requests that in future he be allowed an allowance to purchase fuel, which could be paid into the Military Chest or to London at a later date.

146

-

-

-

Attached: A statement of the amount of coal and wood entitled to the Governor between April and October.

149

15 May 1834

T. Cochrane

E.G. Stanley

Transmits a certificate for the last period in which the archdeacon received his salary.

151-153v

15 May 1834

T. Cochrane

E.G. Stanley

Informs Stanley that he has just received a communication from the Board of Ordnance. Claims the Board has judged his conduct without full knowledge of the facts. Explains his inability to control the delays regarding the transfer of ground to the Board.

155-161

-

-

-

Attached: An excerpted copy of the Board of Ordnance’s precis regarding Cochrane and the land transfer, with the Governor’s refutations of certain remarks recorded opposite.

162

18 Nov 1833

J. Crowdy

Officers of the Ordnance

Attached: Crowdy informs the officers of several claims that have arisen to the lands intended to be part of the Ordnance grant. Informs the officers that Cochrane will not delay the grant, but will insert a clause within preserving the rights of the claimants.

164-165

16 May 1834

Surveyor General

[J. Crowdy?]

A report noting the Surveyor General’s survey of the lands comprising the Ordnance grant.

166-166v

16 May 1834

Surveyor General

J. Crowdy

Reports the findings of his survey of the lands in the vicinity of Fort Townshend. Notes that his findings coincide with those of the 1813 survey.

168

30 Jun 1813

Officers of the Ordnance

Sir Richard Keats

Attached: An extract from the officers’ letter to Governor Keats recommending that no new fences be constructed within one hundred and fifty yards a recently drawn perimeter around Fort Townshend.

169-169v

2 Jul 1813

Sir Richard Keats

Officers of the Ordnance

Attached: Keats acknowledges receipt of the officers’ letter and assures them no construction will occur in the aforementioned area. Recommends the are be staked off to prevent future encroachment.

172-173

16 May 1834

T. Cochrane

E.G. Stanley

Informs Stanley that Mr. Templeman, a claimant to the lands of the Ordnance grant, relinquishes his claims. Notes that while he is prepared to make the transfer upon hearing from Stanley, he has no control over some of the privately-owned lands included in the grant.

174-174v

17 May 1834

T. Cochrane

E.G. Stanley

Forwards a memorial to Stanley at the request of the House of Assembly. Notes that the memorial mentions a "foreign naval force," which he believes is probably a French force acting in defense of their fisheries.

175-177

13 May 1834

Bennett & the House of Assembly

"To the King’s Most Excellent Majesty"

Attached: The aforementioned memorial. Complains of the high value of the French Shore fishery, the increase of Spanish duties on British fish, and the supposed exploitation of local fisheries by France.

179-180

4 Aug 1834

Spring Rice (Downing Street)

T. Cochrane

Notes the receipt of the memorial. Indicates that His Majesty is aware of the problems regarding the Spanish duties, and that British aid is available in the event of a substantiated case of abuse against local fishermen. Alludes to another memorial, dated 20 May, from the Chamber of Commerce.

180v-181

-

-

-

Attached: Copies of the aforementioned memorials.

182

23 May 1834

T. Cochrane

E.G. Stanley

Transmits copies of several rules adopted in the last term of the Supreme Court of Newfoundland for the King’s signature.

183

26 Mar 1834

H. Boulton

T. Cochrane

Attached: Boulton’s letter to Cochrane, in which the rules adopted by the Court were enclosed.

186-195

-

-

-

Attached: A copy of the new regulations adopted by the Supreme Court. The document comprises twelve rules and a number of writs.

197-198

23 May 1834

T. Cochrane

R.W. Hay

Informs Hay of several serious charges being laid against a member of the Supreme Court (Judge Des Barres). Corrects Hay in noting that the judge had not been suspended from the bench, but that he was instead given a leave of absence.

199-206

27 May 1834

T. Cochrane

E.G. Stanley

Transmits the proceedings of the charges against Des Barres to Stanley. Outlines the charge of assault and obstruction of a peace officer, of which Des Barres was acquitted. Recounts several of the other charges against Des Barres and registers. Decries the poor state of the judicial system in the colony.

207-

208v

5 Apr 1834

-

R.W. Hay

Attached: A report to Hay detailing the charges against Des Barres. Claims Cochrane’s transmission of the details has been "of an imperfect and unsatisfactory manner." Discusses the propriety of the matter being dealt with by the Secretary of State.

209-210v

-

-

-

Attached: An account of a meeting of Council held on 24 Dec 1834 in which Cochrane brings forth the issue of the allegations against Des Barres and the manner in which he is to be suspended.

211

21 Dec 1833

J. Crowdy

Des Barres

Attached: Transmits to Des Barres a copy of the magistrate’s charges against him. Offer him the opportunity to submit an explanation of his actions to the Governor.

212

19 Dec 1833

Judges Blaikie and Carter

J. Crowdy

Transmit depositions against Des Barres for offenses including the abuse of police constables and magistrates and the use of "scandalous epithets."

213

19 Dec 1833

David Rogers

Blaikie and Carter

Attached: A copy of the deposition of David Rogers.

213v-214v

20 Dec 1833

David Rogers

Blaikie and Carter

Attached: A copy of the second deposition of David Rogers.

215

19 Dec 1833

George Polk

Carter

Attached: A copy of the deposition of George Polk.

215v-216

19 Dec 1833

Richard Butt

Blaikie

Attached: A copy of the deposition of Richard Butt.

216-216v

19 Dec 1833

David Rogers

Blaikie and Carter

Attached: A copy of the third deposition of David Rogers.

217-218v

23 Dec 1833

Blaikie and Carter

J. Crowdy

Attached: A copy of the judges’ account of the reporting of Des Barres’ actions against magistrates and constables.

219-225v

23 Dec 1833

Des Barres

J. Crowdy

Attached: A copy of Des Barres’ explanation of his actions to the office of the Governor. Complains of being accused by the judges without having been asked to give his own account.

226-228

23 Dec 1833

Blaikie

J. Crowdy

Attached: A copy of Blaikie’s account of his confrontation with Des Barres during a holding of a Court of Sessions, of which Carter had been appointed magistrate for the week.

229-230v

23 Dec 1833

H.A. Emerson

J. Crowdy

Attached: A copy of Emerson’s account of the aforementioned confrontation between Blaikie and Des Barres, to which Emerson was a witness.

231-231v

27 Jan 1834

J. Crowdy

Des Barres

A copy of Crowdy’s letter to Des Barres in which two statements regarding charges of abusive language by Des Barres are enclosed.

232-233

3 Feb 1834

Des Barres

J. Crowdy

Attached: A copy of Des Barres’ reply to Crowdy’s letter. Regrets that, despite having been acquitted of the charge of assault and obstruction, the Governor still considers explanation necessary. Rejects the truthfulness of Emerson’s and Blaikie’s reports.

234-241v

-

-

-

Attached: This long document is comprised of the notes taken during the presentation of evidence at Des Barres’ trial.

242

15 Feb 1834

J. Crowdy

Des Barres

Expresses the Governor’s suspicions after having viewed the proceedings of Des Barres’ trial and invites him to comment on the situation.

242v

17 Feb 1834

Des Barres

J. Crowdy

Requests that a copy of the report on his trial be sent to him so that he may be fully aware of the document upon which he is expected to comment.

243

20 Feb 1834

J. Crowdy

Des Barres

Transmits extracts from the report to Des Barres.

244-245

4 Mar 1834

Des Barres

Crowdy

A copy of Des Barres’ reply to Crowdy, in which he states he sees nothing in the report that would warrant his explanation. States that he will withhold further comment for the Secretary of State, should Cochrane decide to involve him.

246-247v

7 Mar 1834

J. Crowdy

H. Boulton

Communicates the Governor’s wishes that the Chief Justice provide his opinion and advice regarding confusion over the report of Des Barres’ trial and the possible falsification of evidential documents.

248-258

20 Mar 1834

H. Boulton

J. Crowdy

Recounts his examination of the evidence and documents involved in Des Barres’ trial. Acquiesces to the Governor’s request for an opinion on the nature of the charges against Des Barres and the possibility that he was responsible for altering several documents used as evidence.

259-261

26 Mar 1834

J. Crowdy

Des Barres

Details Cochrane’s reasons for requesting further explanation regarding the court case. Informs Des Barres that Cochrane feels it will be impossible for him to return to the bench with the confidence of the government.

262-266

10 Apr 1834

Des Barres

J. Crowdy

Offers a paragraph-by-paragraph response to Crowdy’s previous letter. Disputes Cochrane’s view of his case and decries the injustice of being compelled to explain himself after having been acquitted of the charges. Charges Cochrane with harbouring undeserved suspicions.

268-268v

31 May 1834

T. Cochrane

E.G. Stanley

Transmits several dispatches and attached documents to Stanley. Notes that he would have transmitted them during his time in England, but that Des Barres requested their delay to allow an opportunity to explain himself in person.

270

2 June 1834

T. Cochrane

E.G. Stanley

Forwards a memorial from the Chamber of Commerce of St. John’s regarding the recessive state of the fishery and the departure of many fishermen to the United States. States that he can personally confirm the contents of the memorial.

272-273

-

James McBride and the Chamber of Commerce

E.G. Stanley

"The Memorial of the President, Vice Presidents, and Members of the Chamber of Commerce of Saint John’s, in the Island of Newfoundland." The aforementioned memorial, concerning the poor state of the fishery and the departure of fishermen.

274-277v

12 June 1834

T. Cochrane

Lord ???

A hastily-written letter by Cochrane to an unidentified author, in which Cochrane appears to be appealing against his removal from the post of Governor of Newfoundland.

278-279

13 June 1834

T. Cochrane

E.G. Stanley

Transmits a statement from the Colonial Parliament detailing services which have been paid for and those which the Parliament believes should be paid for by land rent. Cochrane disagrees with Parliament’s recommendation on the grounds that rent incomes are too low and the people too poor.

280

-

-

-

Attached: The Colonial Parliament’s statement of expenses and payments.

282-283

14 June 1834

T. Cochrane

E.G. Stanley

Requests that the Crown provide a retirement pension to Chief Magistrate John Broom, for his forty-two years of service, in the wake of the Colonial Parliament’s refusal to provide for him.

284-285

-

John Broom

T. Cochrane

Attached: "The Memorial of John Broom, Chief Magistrate of St. John’s Newfoundland." Broom is in his seventy-ninth year [born ca 1755] and wishes to retire with a pension; Outlines Broom’s various appointments and services [began his judicial service when still a resident of Burin [1792-1806] and subsequently magistrate for Placentia Bay and the South West District. Makes the case for the awarding of a retirement salary.

286-286v

17 May 1834

-

-

Attached: A statement noting the transmission of Broom’s memorial by Cochrane to the House of Assembly and the subsequent consideration of Broom’s request.

287

7 Apr 1834

-

-

A brief note indicating Cochrane’s transmission of William Shepard’s petition for the consideration of the House.

288-289

7 Jun 1834

Bennett & the House of Assembly

T. Cochrane

Informs Cochrane of the receipt and consideration of the petitions of Broom and Shepard. Requests that Cochrane appeal for the Imperial Parliament to provide their pensions, as their services were rendered to the Island before the establishment of local government.

290

14 Jun 1834

T. Cochrane

E.G. Stanley

Transmits a report regarding the complaints of Capt. Pearl involving a dispute over a parcel of land

292-295

-

-

-

Attached: The aforementioned report regarding the rental of lands on the western side of St. John’s by Capt. Pearl, and his subsequent complaints and non-payment of rent.

296

30 Jul 1834

John Sheer [??], "Chairman"

-

Attached: A letter in which the author confirms that he served as chairman to Surveyor General Holbrook and his successor during the period in which several surveys were made of Capt. Pearl’s lands.

297

30 Jul 1834

Newman W. Hoyle

-

Attached: The author certifies that he was the acting Surveyor General in 1833, and that he surveyed lands for Capt. Pearl at the request of the Governor.

298

-

-

-

Attached: A diagram showing the dimensions of Pearl’s lands along Placentia Road..

299-299v

-

John Howson

-

Attached: Howson certifies that he delivered a letter for Capt. Pearl from the Colonial Secretary to the residence of John Boggan, whom Pearl had charged with forwarding letters to him, and that Boggan confirmed forwarding the letter to Pearl.

-302v

14 Jun 1834

T. Cochrane

E.G. Stanley

Replies to Stanley’s letter regarding the regulations and fees attached to quarantine legislation put in place the previous year. Details charges made against the vessels "Queen," "Eliza Anne," and "Exeter."

303

16 Jun 1834

T. Cochrane

E.G. Stanley

Informs Stanley of the arrival of seventy-six men to supplement the Royal Veteran Companies, but that a reduction of thirty-three men will soon occur. Transmits a document detailing the present strength of the garrison.

304

-

-

-

Attached: Cochrane’s report on the strength of the colonial garrison.

306-307v

16 Jun 1834

T. Cochrane

E.G. Stanley

Details the various regulations associated with the quarantine legislation. Explains the reasons for the imposition of quarantine fees.

308-309v

-

-

-

Attached: A statement of the quarantine regulations and the charges made to quarantined shipping.

311-312

17 Jun 1834

T. Cochrane

E.G. Stanley

Transmits requests from the inhabitants of Harbour Grace and Carbonear that their respective harbours be made a free port. Regrets that the rival towns have not come together to offer a joint memorial requesting the freeing of one port or the other.

313-313v

18 Dec 1832

J. Crowdy

President of the Commercial Society (Harbour Grace)

Attached: Crowdy informs the Commercial Society that while the Governor would be willing to accept the petition for free-port status, providing the Society transmits a statement of all inward and outward trade in the region.

315-317v

13 Feb 1833

Representative of the Commercial Society of Harbour Gace

J. Crowdy

Attached: The Commercial Society’s reply to Crowdy, in which a statement on the economy of Conception Bay is made. Of particular note is the Society’s estimation that thirty-thousand people resided in the Conception Bay area.

319-320

22 Feb 1833

J. Crowdy

Members of the District of Conception Bay

Attached: Informs the members of the district that the Governor must reject requests to make the outports duty-free. Suggests that the citizens of the outports act in concert with Harbour Grace to find the most suitable port to be awarded free warehousing status.

321-323

-

-

-

Attached: A petition of the residents of Harbour Grace, Port de Grave, Carbonear, and Brigus, requesting that Harbour Grace be designated a free port. Also attached are documents further detailing the economic situation in Conception Bay.

324-325v

18 Jun 1834

T. Cochrane

E.G. Stanley

Informs Stanley that is forwarding an outline of the town of St. John’s and the areas in which construction is prohibited by law. Draws Stanley’s attention to the fact that many planned constructions are, in fact, illegal, and may only be proceeded upon with Stanley’s command.

326

-

-

-

Attached: A plan of the town of St. John’s showing a 600-yard radius around Forts Townshend and William.

Index

327-332

-

-

-

The index of correspondences for this volume.

End of Volume