CO 194/84 [Reel B-535]

Page

Date

From whom (where)

To whom
(where)

Contents or nature of the document

Newfoundland 1832: Vol. 2: Public Offices and Miscellaneous

House of Commons

4

28 Jan. 1832

J.H. Ley

-

A resolution that a copy of the directions given to the Governor of Newfoundland and the dispatches from Goderich thereon be laid before Parliament for consideration.

Admiralty

7-7v

30 April 1832

John Barrow, Admiralty Office

Viscount Howick

Informing him that he has laid before the Lord commissioners Howick’s letter describing the disturbances in the "Carboniere Bay"[Carbonear] region of Newfoundland and requesting that a vessel of war be sent to that region to control the situation. He informs Howick that the request has been passed on to the admiral commanding the navy in North America.

9

8 Aug. 1832

George Elliot, Admiralty

Viscount Howick

Transmitting a letter from Vice-Admiral Edward Colpays regarding the vessels employed in subduing the disturbances in Carboniere Bay.

10-10v

21 June 1832

Vice-Admiral E.G. Colpays, Winchester, at Bermuda

Capt. George Elliot

Informing Elliot that HMS North Star has been deployed to Carboniere Bay with the Bishop of Nova Scotia onboard who will be taken ashore to pacify the people. If any disturbances occur, the North Star will be sure to know of them promptly and will sail to those areas immediately. Colpays intends to personally visit the region on his way to Halifax in July.

13

2 Oct. 1832

John Barrow, Admiralty

Viscount Howick

Transmitting a letter from Vice-Admiral Colpays as evidence that a ship has been dispatched to Newfoundland as per Goderich’s orders.

14-14v

8 Sept. 1832

Vice-Admiral Colpays, Winchester at Halifax

Captain George Elliot

Informing the Lord Commissioners that he was personally unable to visit Carboniere Bay due the transfer of two regiments between Nova Scotia and New Brunswick on His Majesty’s Ships. He has however dispatched a vessel to the region to obtain news on the situation there.

17

18 Oct. 1832

John Barrow

R.W. Hay, Colonial Office

Stating that orders have been given to Vice-Admiral Colpays to remove the perishable stores from Newfoundland to Halifax. The Lord Commissioners of the Admiralty request that Goderich send orders to Cochrane to comply with these orders.

19

30 Oct. 1832

John Barrow

Viscount Howick

Transmitting a letter from Colpays on the subject of the disturbances in Carboniere Bay.

20-21v

23 Sept. 1832

Vice-Admiral E.G. Colpays, Winchester at Halifax

Captain George Elliot

Upon receiving a report from the captain of HMS North Star, Colpays conveys the report given by the captain to the Lord Commissioners. The captain reported that the only disturbance that occurred was at Harbour Grace as a result of the harsh winter and lack of provisions there. After provisions were distributed by the government, the region reverted to a tranquil state.

Agent

24

27 Jan. 1832

Robert Gwilt, Agent’s Office, Chelsea Hospital

Lord Howick

Gwilt informs Howick that he has received a letter from Tucker informing him that he is now Acting Governor of Newfoundland, and requests that he be paid a moiety of the Governor’s salary. Gwilt inquires if he should do this.

26

18 May 1832

Robert Gwilt, Agent’s Office, Chelsea Hospital

Viscount Howick

Regarding the drawing of three bills by Tucker for the Assistant Judges in Newfoundland. Gwilt asks Howick to inquire of Goderich if the bills should be paid.

28-28v

11 June 1832

Robert Gwilt, Agent’s Office, Chelsea Hospital

Viscount Howick

Inquiring if he should pay four bills drawn by Tucker for himself, Mr. Crowdy, and Mr. Holbrook’s widow. He also inquires if he should pay a sum of ₤112, the retired allowance of the former Supreme Surrogate and Chief Magistrate of St. John’s, to his nephew Richard Coote.

30

16 Dec. 1832

Royal Hospital Chelsea

-

A letter informing Lord Howick that Mr. Coote, former Chief Surrogate at St. John’s, died on 17 May 1831.

Colonial Agent

33-34

6 March 1832

Villiers

Howick

Regarding a bill of exchange drawn by President Tucker. The writer is unsure if he is to pay it or not and asks Howick for advice. He is anxious for advice before it is too late.

35

1 May 1832

Villiers

-

After receiving a request for paint by the Newfoundland Government deVilliers requests that he be furnished with a supply of it.

36

1 Oct. 1831

James Crowdy

Hyde Villiers

Attached: a copy of a letter conveying the request of Governor Cochrane for a supply of paint for the coming year.

37

28 Sept. 1831

D. Brenton, High Sheriff, St. John’s

-

Attached: copy of a letter listing the material required for the upkeep of public buildings in St. John’s.

39

1 May 1832

Villiers

-

Requesting that he be furnished with certain articles of stationery to provide to the Government of Newfoundland.

40

7 Dec. 1831

James Crowdy

Villiers

Sending a duplicate list of stationery required for 1832. A mistake in the number of knives required was found on the one sent previously.

41-41v

-

James Crowdy

-

Attached: the aforementioned list of stationery required for the year 1832.

43

1 May 1832

Villiers

R.W. Hay

Transmitting a requisition for certain volumes of statutes by the Newfoundland Government.

44

16 Aug. 1830

John Campbell, Secretary, Government House, Newfoundland

Villiers

Attached: copy of a letter on behalf of the judges of the Supreme Court who complain that their library of legal statutes is deficient and request that more statues be sent from England.

45

16 Aug. 1830

Charles D. Archibald, Chief Clerk and Registrar, Supreme Court, St. John’s

-

Attached: a copy of a list of volumes of statutes that are requested for the library of the Supreme Court of Newfoundland.

Colonial Office

48-48v

1 Aug. 1832

S. Bathurst

The King’s Most Excellent Majesty in Council

Regarding a letter from Goderich to another Lord giving "Sir John Cochrane, Governor and Commander in Chief of the Island of Newfoundland (presumably Thomas Cochrane)" a commission with the approval of His Majesty’s Privy Council.

Home Office

51

3 Feb. 1832

L. M Phillips

 R.W Hay 

Upon the direction of Viscount Melbourne, the letter that follow was sent to Hay on Josiah Blackburn’s petition for a position in a department of the Newfoundland government. The author would like Hay to arrange for Blackburn to become acquainted with Goderich.

53

3 Oct. 1831

J. Blackburn
(Placentia)

The King

The petition of J. Blackburn for a role in a department in government, due to his family’s lack of appropriate means since the death of their father, Jonah.

55

3 Oct. 1831

J. Blackburn
(Placentia)

Earl Grey,

Secretary of State.

Regarding his petition, Blackburn asks for Grey’s assistance to ensure it is read, as he is unfamiliar with the proper process in making an to appeal to the King.

57-57v.

19 April. 1832

L.M. Phillips

(Whitehall)

Viscount Howick

Regarding the prisoner Michael Fogarty, the author notes he has the letters on the prisoner from Howick. But, he asks for Goderich’s letters on this matter as well so that Fogarty can be sent to Devonforth.

Ordnance

60-62v

27 Aug. 1832

A. Byham

R.W Hay

A substantial file concerning the encroachment on lands in and around St. John’s that are claimed to belong to the Department of Ordinance, Byham feels that the government of the day is unwilling to recognize the title to the land. This is to be passed along to Goderich, so that he may confirm an earlier declaration on this matter. The file includes a number of attachments which set out the basis for the claims of the Ordnance Department to the lands.
64-65v.

8 June. 1802 [Copy]

John Oldfield

Sir A. Bryce R.C.A.

Attached: The Department of Engineers’ Report. Having been commissioned by Bryce, it details the basic nature of the lands allotted to the Department of Ordnance.
66

22. Oct. 1780 [Copy]

John Campbell

-

Attached: The first portion of an Appendix to the Engineers’ Report. Contains a letter from John Campbell which supports the general claims of the report and expands upon them.
66v-68

4 Sept. 1766 [Copy]

Hugh Palliser.

-

The letter authorizes the division of land for military use, particularly for that of farming, among other related matters.
68

28 May 1832 [Copy]

J. Oldfield

R.A. Tucker

The letter concerns a land marker set up in the area which has been claimed by the Ordnance department
68v-69

29 May 1832 [Copy]

J. Oldfield

The Secretary’s Office

This letter restates points made in the previous letter but also refers to the Palliser document and a claim which states the title to the land has been held for "upwards of seventy years."
69

5 Oct. 1799 [Copy]

W. Waldegrave

(Fort Townshend, St. John’s)

Several Officers

Waldegrave notes that he has received letters from garrison officers and has given them permission to erect fencing and buildings
69 - 69v

9 July 1818 [Copy]

John Bowker

(Fort Townshend, St. John’s)

Officers of the Ordnance

letter in reply to the Ordnance Office regarding Garrison Order 1; he recommends that they continue with their construction, so long as it can conform to existing plans.
70-70v

13 June 1818 [Copy]

John Bowker

-

Letter authorizing the building of a house and office, which describes the exact boundaries of the parcel of land. The document refers not just to the building of facilities, but uses the Ordnance Garden as a point of reference. The letter therefore supports the argument of Ordnance ownership of land
70v.-71

10 July 1813 [Copy]

R.G Keats

-

The letter gives the right to appropriate and thus acquire proper control over four acres of land for military use for purposes of encampment, etc.. The document lists the exact boundaries and sizes of associated and surrounding lands.
71-71v

11 Oct. 1775 [Copy]

Robert Duff

-

[Gov.] Duff stipulates that the lands surrounding the ‘new’ fort [Fort Townshend] and other places of interest are to be for the King’s use alone, with other structures being torn down.
71v-72v

10 Nov. 1813 [Copy]

R.G Keats (Fort Townshend, St. John’s)

E. Harrison, Treasury.

Keats acknowledges receipt of a letter which carried copies of two letters written by Adm. Holloway to the Gen. Secretary to the Board of the Ordnance. In Keats view, it is "absolutely required for Ordnance Military purposes" to have the particular area of land. Expounding on this, Keats speaks to the past decisions of Duff to entrust the defense of St. John’s to Forts Townshend and Williams and of Holloway to abandon this policy and thus create what was commonly called Ordnance lands out of the formerly defended area.
72v-73

10 Oct. 1784 [Copy]

John Campbell

(St. John’s)

-

[Gov] Campbell addresses the need for a garden for Fort Townshend’s infantry, apart from that of the Artillery. Campbell permits the building of a fenced garden on the condition that it is passed solely to succeeding infantry detachments.
73-73v

6 Oct. 1804 [Copy]

Adm.. Erasmus Gower

-

Gower acknowledges that the Artillery detachment relinquishes their garden to the Society for Improving the Condition of the Poor in St. John’s. Gower then grants the Artillery a new plot of land on which to build a garden, as per several conditions.
73v-74

16 Oct. 1804 [Copy]

V.Adm. John Holloway

(St. John’s)

-

A proclamation restricting the building of any structure in and around Signal Hill and the lands surrounding, for the protection of the harbour area and the security of existing fortifications there.
74

10 Oct. 1806 [Copy]

Adm.. Erasmus Gower

-

Gower permits construction of a new house for the Ordnance Department after the previous one had decayed beyond repair.
74

16 Oct. 1807 [Copy]

John Holloway

-

Attached: An Addendum to the previous order by Gower, stipulating that the requested guard house is to be built in its former location and not the one suggested to Gower.
74v

1 Aug. 1812 [Copy]

Frank Moore

-

A brief letter describing the poor state of the Signal House and of Red Head, concluding that the area’s port must be re-established.
74v

5 June 1832

[Copy]

R.G Keats (Fort Townshend, St. John’s)

-

addressing the reestablishment of the Battery in Torbay and the annexation of the lands surrounding the site..
75

24 July 1787 [Copy]

J. Elliott

(St. John’s)

-

Elliott grants the use of land near the harbor which had been burned by fire in 1783 by the Ordnance to build another house and for public use.
75v

5 Oct. 1814 [Copy]

Col. Durnford

Gen. Mann

An Extract of a "Report from Col.Durnford to Gen. Mann". This extract indicates that the Ordnance Dept. has not relinquished its claim over its lands, as given to them by Duff and therefore object to any encroachments upon this fertile farming property.
76- 80

8 June, 1832 [Copy]

Engineer’s Office

-

"Return of certain lands in the Colony of Newfoundland connected with the Defences and Military Establishment of which it is recommended should be transferred to the Ordnance for Military Purposes" This table lists the various properties claimed by the Ordnance Department in the accompanying maps (including the manner in which these properties were gained and used).
81

- [Copy]

-

-

Maps which illustrate the claims of the Ordnance Department, the lands allotted to them in St. John’s and the surrounding area.
82-83v

24 Oct. 1832

A. Byham

R.M Hay

Regarding a resolution to the issue of the encroachment of lands which were said to be controlled by Ordnance, but were improperly given to individuals, Byham basically iterates the findings of the Attorney General of Newfoundland on this matter, which fall in their favour. Byham then asks for Goderich’s information as well as a series of sketches of Lots in St. John’s, for which they plan to trade a portion of their newly gained land to Government House for another.
84

4 Feb. 1832

-

-

"Extract from a Schedule of Garden Grounds". This extract lists the current land occupants, the uses of the land (including, of course, mostly gardens) as well as remarks which sometime detail how the land was obtained.

Treasury

87

19 Jan. 1832

J. Steward

Viscount Howick

Regarding a letter that Lord Goderich sent on 10 November 1831; the Commissioners of the Treasury relate some issues of financial standing and in particular a bill of 350 pounds,
89-89v

3 Oct. 1832

W. Bonner (Dublin)

T.R. N[????]

A letter that elaborates further on the nature of the bill mentioned in the previous letter, but the text is extremely faded, making the letter largely illegible. There is reference to a ‘bond’ and to a court appearance.
91-96

2 Jan. 1832

A.L Gram

-

Starts off as a case before the Attorney General and Solicitor General about carrying more of an unknown object than allowed by law. Reference is made to a bond placed upon [??], due to the under-provision of foodstuffs and the carrying of another substance; a bill of £350 pounds is charged for the abuse of the law. This is then supported by reference to a series of letters, which are listed and summarized. This is then followed by a description of what appears to be the delivery of goods to the Channel Islands of Jersey, Guernsey and Alderney along with some other object, which was in greater quantities than allowed by law. Thus, [] has been prohibited to trade in these areas and the bond has been set.
97

9 Feb. 1832

J. Steward (Treasury Chambers)

-

A letter concerning a bill in the amount of £1150 which has been sent to the Treasury by Acting Governor Tucker. The bill was incurred for provisions for the half year ending 31 December past to cover provisions for the colonial vessel Forte.
99-99v

29 June 1832

J. Steward (Treasury Chambers)

-

A letter concerning another bill to the amount of £6550, which was sent to the Treasury by the Governor of Newfoundland . Lord Goderich’s input is desired; Steward states that he has no objection to the use of the funds.
101-101v

24 July 1832

J. Steward (Treasury Chambers)

-

A letter concerning the salary of Capt. John Campbell, which has been sent to the Treasury by Governor Cochrane. Campbell served as the Secretary to the Governor. Viscount Goderich’s view on this matter is that a "fixed and proper amount" should be given by the Office, but strictly from colonial sources.
103-103v

30 June 1832

Thomas Cochrane (London)

[Viscount Howick]

Cochrane’s letter, referenced in the previous document, stipulating that the Governor’s Secretary [i.e., Capt. Campbell] should received a salary for his services of about £100 to £200 per annum..
105

7 June. 1832

Thomas Cochrane

-

A letter from Cochrane asking for research into a Memorial for Capt. Campbell from the Dept. of the Treasury. As such, Cochrane suggest that Campbell’s current pay ten [pence] per day is "entirely inadequate".
107

-

John Campbell

Commissioner of the Treasury

The Memorial of Capt. John Campbell, in response to the request by Cochrane mentioned in the previous document. Campbell comments on the inadequacy of Campbell’s current pay and request an improvement in pay.
109

22 June. 1832 (Copy)

-

-

An excerpt copied from the Minutes of a Meeting of the Treasury which notes that the aforementioned Memorial of Capt. Campbell has been read The minutes note the general endorsement of the Treasury to this request.
111

11 Oct. 1832

J. Steward (Treasury Chambers)

Viscount Howick

Reply to a letter from Howick with information on the distribution by the Governor of provisions to settlements in Northern Newfoundland. Viscount Goderich agrees with this, but it is suggested that those who can or will eventually be able to repay the government for these provisions be made do so in time. It also requests that the Governor consult with the Secretary of State on the matter of those who have been exempted from payment.
113-113v

31 Oct. 1832

J. Steward (Treasury Chambers)

Viscount Howick

A letter in reply to Howick with information on a request from the Chief Justice of Newfoundland for compensation for duties he performed in the Governor's stead while the Governor was away. Steward notes that during this period, Le Breton (the Chief Justice) received half pay for his duties as Chief Justice. He therefore suggests that Le Breton receive all the pay to which he is correctly entitled minus the pay already drawn.
115

10 Nov. 1832

J. Steward (Treasury Chambers)

Viscount Howick

A reply to Howick in response to a request from [???] for compensation for bread which was given by him to the citizens of King’s Cove, Bonavista who suffered jaundice. Lord Goderich feels there is no reason not to give some recompense for such civil service and recommends, through Steward, that [???] be given fifty bags of bread.
117 15 Nov. 1832

J. Steward (Treasury Chambers)

Viscount Howick

Response to Howick’s request for an account of the quantity of spirits which were sent from the United Kingdom to Newfoundland and had a duty applied to them.
119

14 Nov. 1832

M. Irving

J. Steward

A table describing importations of spirits from the United Kingdom to Newfoundland in 1830 and 1831. The table breaks down the two particular spirits which were delivered and their total by amount in gallons.
121-121v

22 Nov. 1832

J. Steward (Treasury Chambers)

Viscount Howick

Concerning Lord Goderich’s quarterly financial returns for the colonies. Steward comments upon Goderich’s commitment to such a process, as it would allow Colonial Governments to have receipts for their transactions. As such, these rules must then be applied to Newfoundland. Though admitting this is an imperfect system, Goderich believes that Newfoundland and its Governor must still work within these rules.
123

22 Dec. 1832

-

Viscount Howick

 

War Office

126-126v

2 May 1832

[???] Seward (War Office)

Viscount Goderich

Regarding a letter from George Murray on the matter of free postage being given at the Colony of the Cape of Good Hope to letters being sent to the War Office. This is to be done as well in the Colony of Newfoundland, thereby bringing an end to the cost to the War Office of postage from there.
128

20 March 1832

[???] Kenzie

L. Sullivan

a letter from the Acting Pay Master raised complaints about postage and the need to establish a Post Office Past governors had individuals who acted in that capacity; this was perfectly legal under a ruling of the Supreme Court, which indirectly supports such an office.
130

15 March 1832

-

[???] Kenzie

Secretary of War discussed the issue of postage of Official Letters and Packages. This letter airs the author’s grievances over the past four years in this matter.
132

1 Dec. 1832

John Vellance

Lord Godrich

Sends a copy of a letter from the commanding officer of the Royal Newfoundland Veteran Companies regarding the changes made to the Postal Services. The author informs Goderich that that he should reacquaint himself with the measures which have been adopted on this matter.

School Society

134-134v 28 Feb. 1832

-

Viscount Goderich

Concerns the visit of the Superintendant of the School Society, Mark Willoughby,, to Newfoundland schools. The trip was lengthy due to the affairs of the school which delayed Mr. Willoughby Because of this delay, the author asks Goderich to grant Willoughby’s introduction letter, which he used in Newfoundland, to other authorities in Upper and Lower Canada, where the Society and Mr. Willoughby hope to set up schools next much as was done in Newfoundland.
135

-

The Newfoundland and British North America School Society

-

A document describing in detail the history, goals and current predicament of the Society. The document first focuses on the Society’s successes in Newfoundland, with support from Governor Thomas Cochrane, while still emphasizing current problems. The document then makes a plea for similar Anglo-Christian schooling throughout British North America.
137-138

-

Various Merchants

Viscount Goderich

A Petition by various local merchants in support of the Newfoundland and British North America School Society. The petition encourages Goderich to enable the Society to set up in parts of British North America outside Newfoundland. Specifically, money is needed to fulfill the goals outlined in the previous documents, goals that can best be summarized as providing further religious education for the poor.
140

17 July, 1831

Tho[] Atkins

Viscount Goderich

A letter regarding a matter, related to those above, which is to be brought forward to Court.

Mr. Archibald

143

3 May, 1832

C.D. Archibald

Viscount Howick

Archibald acknowledges receipt of Howick’s message concerning permission by Goderich to allow Archibald to proceed to England. During the voyage, Archibald fell ill. Following medical treatment, he hoped to serve Howick in London. Archibald then comments on the creation of a local legislature in Newfoundland, at which point he solicits an appointment as Clerk of the Legislature.
145

11 June, 1832

-

C.D. Archibald {?}

The quickly written letter begins with an apology to the reader for not being around at some earlier point when desired. The author then states that the salary owed [??] was [??] and that the author is unable to pay the salary himself to any of the officers in the Colony. The author then suggests that the reader contact Lord Goderich and ask for his aid in the matter.
147

14 June, 1832

C.D. Archibald

Viscount Howick

[this letter is heavily faded] from what can be read, Archibald is following through on the previous letter with a request to Goderich for salary owed.
149-149v

13 July, 1832

C.D. Archibald

Viscount Howick

Archibald reports with obvious glee that Goderich, Secretary of State for the Colonies, has nominated him to be the Clerk of the Legislative Assembly in Newfoundland. The letter then speaks of how further to secure this position and thanks Horwick for his assistance.
151-151v

20 July, 1832

C.D. Archibald

C. Douglas

Archibald, again referring to his nomination by Goderich and the still fluid nature of the shape the Newfoundland Legislature will take, states that he wishes some freedom of travel within his position. He states that it is best for him not to arrive in the province, since he is still in England (in accordance with as Goderich’s permission) until things have been put into place for him.
153-154

23 Aug. 1832

C.D. Archibald

Viscount Howick

Having secured the position of the Clerk of the Legislature, Archibald now asks that this position along with that of Registrar of the Supreme Court and Clerk of the House of Assembly (all positions that he has held until now) be transferred to his brother, Edward Mortimer. This is because of his own poor health over the past two winters. He feels that this will only be exacerbated by the climate of Newfoundland. Archibald feels that his brother, as a barrister of nearby Nova Scotia, would be fine in his regard. Archibald adds that his argument for this position was based on his father’s former role in PEI which he did not inherit and thus he hopes that his brother would gain these titles.

B

156-156v

19 March, 1832

Mr. Brooking

Viscount Goderich

Referring to the Memorial of a certain Mr. Holbrook, the author refers to previous contact he has had with others, though regretting his not knowing Goderich. After drawing a series of connections from this, and after making some reference to the widow of Mr. Holbrook, who is under his charge and care, he asks Goderich for a position in the colonial government of Newfoundland
158-159

2 Feb. 1831

Mr. Brooking

The President [R.A Tucker?]

Repeating much the same rationale as in his previous letter, the author implores the President to give him an appointment, not for his own benefit, but for that of the widow and children of his relative, Mr. Holbrook, who are under his care. He then iterates what he feels are his positive attributes for the position he desires as well as a summation of his past military career and the injury he had done to the enemy
160

18 April, 1832

Mr. Brooking

R.M Hay

Regarding the arrival of the vessel which is currently under the command of the author, Hay is informed that it has arrived safely. The author addresses the mission of this voyage, which is to bring the Newfoundland prisoner Michael Fogarty to England.
162-162v

[??]

John Lordnay

Viscount Goderich

Concerning the death of Capt. George William of Newfoundland and the state of affairs of his wife. This letter, like others, petitions for an appointment to a job in government both on his family’s behalf and for their benefit.
163

2 July, 1832

R.A. Tucker

-

Attachment: An edict from Acting Governor Tucker which supplies the widow of Capt. George William, Eunace, with his [?? Illegible]
164

2 July 1832

William Carson, Samuel Carson

-

Attachment: a note which relates that Capt. George William, RN, died early in the morning on Wednesday.
165 - 166

??

??

Viscount Goderich

[Attachment: Too faint to be made out]. May include some reference to Protestants at Placentia]

Mr. Brooking

168-168v

10 Jan. 1832

Mr. Brooking

Viscount Goderich

A representation from a Committee of the Inhabitants of St. John’s concerning the creation of a Legislature for the Island of Newfoundland. This is on behalf of the people of St. John’s and Carbonear..
170

17 Jan. 1832

Walter Crowick

Viscount Goderich

A letter which acts as a cover to two enclosed tables, one regarding the seal fishery and the other on the matter of shipping required by the Newfoundland fishery and trade
172

-

-

-

"An Abstract of the Catch of Seals at Newfoundland in 1830 and 1831".This table is broken down by geographical areas and describes the major areas of the hunt with final totals for both years as well as 1829.
173

-

-

-

"An Abstract amount of Tonnage requested on the Island" for the trade and fishery which breaks down values from 1826-1830.
174-177v

24 Jan. 1832

Committee for the Petitioning for a Legislature in Newfoundland

Viscount Goderich

A petition on the matter of granting a legislature to the Island of Newfoundland. The discussion focuses on Ship Rooms, or the plots of land reserved for fishing vessels and their crew. Petition insists that this places fishermen within the landed class and thus to some degree, voting class. The petition makes other points in support of the core idea of having not just an elected a legislature, but gaining true control within it.
178-80v

11 Dec. 1811 [Copy]

Concerned Group of Subjects

The Prince Regent

Attached: This letter is referenced within the previous petition of 1832. Following a long dedication of loyalty, the letter then revisits the issue of the Ship Room, once more asking for the leave to build new homes in some of these locations and permission to remove dilapidated structures. The citizens then plead for the building of a proper Marketplace, a Seminary and even the establishment of a proper police force, along with other related things.

182-182v.

24 July, 1812 [Copy]

John Duckworth

J. Maitraine, William Carson, George Richard Robinson.

Copy of a letter by Gov. Duckworth in 1812, in which he states that he has received the letter from Robinson which contained the proceeding of a public meeting and the letter previous to the Prince Regent. Duckworth then notes that he has sent these papers to the Earl of Liverpool and the Earl has in turn passed them to the Prince Regent. However, the Regent has decided to reserve his instructions on the matter to himself and his representative.
184

1 Aug. 1831

John Campbell

Viscount Howick

This letter from Campbell discusses a decision from the local government to exempt local payers of rent by means of redeeming it through a paid salary. Campbell notes that the grants for twenty-year renters are the same as those for fifteen years.
186-187v

22 Feb. 1832

Mrs. Blaney

Viscount Goderich

The author’s letter to Goderich implores his allowance to control a property and Ship Room on Church Hill in St. John’s (between Water Street and Duckworth Street). The author then describes its current state due to a fire the year before which had gutted the structure put in place under Gov. Duckworth (see earlier letters in this section for related discussion). As such, and with further explanation, the author petitions Goderich to give him a land grant for this property.
188

5 March, 1832

Mrs. Blaney

Viscount Howick

The author, whose previous letter is addressed above, speaks thankfully toward the grant given him previously. However, on behalf of the Inhabitants of St. John’s, he asks leave to [].
190

5 Nov. 1832

Mr Brooking

  Note regarding a meeting between Brooking and Howick which led to an interview on the matter of Newfoundland’s system of government (ie: The Legislature)
191-192

24 Jan. 1832

Mr Brooking {?}

Viscount Howick

The first page of this letter is nearly illegible From the little which is clearly legible, it appears to relate to the issue of a Legislature in Newfoundland and the concerns of the Committee of St John’s inhabitants.
193

-

-

-

This table lists the number of vessels in the local colonial fishing fleet, the taxes collected from them and the number of men on board in total for 1831 and 1832, as well as their sum total. A second table lists the number of vessels to be [] through out four separate areas on the Island
194-194v

28 June, 1832 [??]

Mr Brooking

Viscount Howick

Brooking requests an interview with Howick

C

196

18 June, 1832

Thomas Congdon

-

Congdon enquires about the yet-uncreated office of Receiver General. He has troubled other people in this regard, but still wishes to enquire further. All of this, in truth, is tied to the creation of a Legislature in Newfoundland, as the position does not even yet exist, while Congdon assumes it will upon the Legislature’s creation and argues that it should.

E

199-199v

3 April, 1832

H. A. Emmerson

Lord [?]

A reply stating that his commission is not yet ready.
201-202v

4 April. 1832

H. A. Emmerson

Viscount Howick

A letter regarding his appointment
203-203v

8 Aug 1832
(Rec’d: 1 Sept 1832)

H. A. Emmerson

-

Emmerson states that he had received the communication from the Lord to whom this letter is addressed. He then thanks this particular lord for a possible office. The letter then discusses the new representative system of government which is to be introduced to the colony, and how it will establish his office. However, he does make reference to amending of a contract, which required the lord’s,, as well as Gov. Cochrane’s, agreement..
205-205v

27 Aug. 1832

H. A. Emmerson

-

Again referring to the contract of the previous letter, Emmerson notes Cochrane’s eventual agreement. As well, on the matter of the office itself, as referenced in the previous letter, that he was rejected from it by Cochrane and wishes his Lord to attempt once more on his behalf.
207-208

8 Sept. 1832

H. A. Emmerson

-

Emmerson again refers to having spoken to Gov. Cochrane about being appointed to the office of the Solicitor General (which was somewhat unclear in previous letters). He then speaks to a perceived incongruence in this matter on the part of Cochrane. He then again asks for his lord’s intercession on this matter, this time aiming to work on his goal through the Colonial Office.

G

210

19 April. 1832

Guillonneau, Public Notary

-

Guillonneau, the Public Notary, presents a document which was before the Public Notary in Newfoundland. His signature on the document was legalized by the Acting Governor who was still required to be legalized himself. A request is made for the Secretary of the Colonial Department to do this, so that the document might be legal.
212

5 Nov. 1832

-

-

A note regarding the transmission of a bag of dispatches from Lord Howick to the Governor of Newfoundland.

H

215

25 April. 1832

Aylmer Hay

R.W Hay

His nephew, Jim Hutchison, was to be appointed Surveyor General with the help of Colonel Hay (Aylmer’s brother); Aylmer now wishes to benefit from this connection by prodding his nephew for an appointment of his own, through his influence with Earl Grey and Howick.
217-217v

30 May, 1832

Aylmer Hay

J.M.L. Chubb

Aylmer notes that the appointment of Hutchison as Surveyor General has fallen through at the hands of Goderich. Aylmer then plots for the removal of the one who has received this position and the ascendancy of his nephew.

L

220-221v

24 April. 1832

R. Wheston

Viscount Goderich

Describes a riot which has taken place due to ‘unpleasant’ fishermen from the district of Carbonear Bay. Many were threatened by the mob. Wheston laments the destruction caused by of the mob, but is pleased to be able to inform Goderich of these events.
222-223v

29 April, 1832

R. Wheston

Viscount Howick

This letter, much like the previous one, alerts the Viscount of the disturbances caused within the district of Carbonear Bay. The Merchants who were involved in this incident focus their requests around local poverty, according to the author of the letter.
224-225

15 Aug. 1832

A Group of Petitioners

Viscount Goderich

A petition complaining that a previous memorial was ignored by the Governor [Cochrane?] on the matter of instructions which needed to be given to Barristers and others in the legal system. They then note that, since a new system of governance is about to be implemented such a Memorial may no longer be required as it could be addressed through the Assembly and a new Solicitor General. That said, they still desire attention placed to this memorial and the regulation of legal appointments to be followed up under the Supreme Court.
226-227v

18 Sept.1832

-

Viscount Howick

This letter, as with the previous petition, calls for a better regulated legal system within the Island of Newfoundland. In discussing the issue of legal appointments within the province, the author delves into a short discussion of reasoning and the use of Royal Prerogative in this matter. Appended to this at the end of the letter, which is oddly unsigned and almost unfinished, is a note which complains that this may have been the only portion of the letter received, indicating that more of it may exist in some form unrecorded here.

O

229-230v

30 Oct. 1832

John Oldfield

Sec. of State for the Colonies

Oldfield begins by discussing the fact that in the event of the Governor’s absence or death, control of the Government would then fall temporarily to Haly, who currently holds membership in Council and the duties of the Chief Justice. Oldfield questions this, noting that he is currently the Commanding Officer of the Troops. This results in some discussion of the position of Chief Justice itself and the manner in which it is appointed.
231-231v  

Dolly Oats

Sec. of State for the Colonies

Dolly Oats of Ireland had a brother, Martin Oats, who died while en route to Quebec. He left a particular sum of money with a Captain Bennett of the Banfe Nelson, on which, at the time, Martin was travelling. The Captain deposited the money, which was to be given to relatives of Mr. Oats, with Mr. Archibald, Clerk of the Supreme Courts of Newfoundland for safe keeping. Having heard no reply from an earlier memorial sent to C.D Archibald, this memorial us sent with a hope for results and the rightful granting of this money to Mr. Oats’ sister.

P

234

19 March, 1832

J. W. Pearl

Viscount Goderich

Concerning Pearl’s brother-in-law, Mr. Holbrook, Surveyor-General of Newfoundland and his untimely death. Pearl then reminds Goderich that he has promised Pearl a position in return for the fact that Mr. Holbrook’s office was already taken, citing the support of Lord Holand and others to this end.
236-236v

21 Oct. 1832

J. W. Pearl

Viscount Goderich

Pearl notes that enclosed are a series of letter which he has attempted to send to Goderich before, but with no success due to various obstacles. Overall, the letter is a complaint leveled towards Gov. Cochrane and his treatment of Pearl, often ignoring him. Pearl draws attention to his agricultural contributions, including improvements to the soil made by himself and other residents.
238-239v

18 Oct. 1832

J.W Pearl

Viscount Goderich

Attached: Pearl builds a case in which he touts himself as the largest landholder in Newfoundland. Pearl then describes the process of appearing before the Governor on a particular day (28 August 1831, 2:00 PM). However, he was turned away by an orderly on the grounds that the Governor was not seeing anyone else that day, only to be retrieved after he had left Government House by Mr. Campbell, the Private Secretary. Campbell claimed that the Governor did not wish to speak to him in particular. The author, deeply offended, then proceeds to write several pages more expressing his feelings and directing invectives against both men and W. Joseph Templeman, a clerk.
240-241

22 Oct. 1832

J.W Pearl

J. W. Connoly

Attached: Mr. Pearl thanks Connoly for having sent him the previous letter and goes on to express his frustration towards the Governor’s ignoring him and blocking his attempts to build upon his large amount of land in the manner he wishes. The Government contends, however, that he required a certificate to receive the land in question in the first place, long after he had finished building and cultivating the land. He then asks for this letter itself to be sent to Cochrane and Goderich.
241v

15 Oct. 1832

J. W. Connoly

J.W Pearl

Attached: This letter from Connoly expresses the Government’s view of the situation, as stated above.

R

243-234v

3 Jan. 1832

Thomas Ridley

Viscount Howick

A petition on behalf of the Committee of the Residents of Harbour Grace, drafted by Ridley expressing their desire for a Legislature for the island and the expedience of doing so.
245-245v

-

Various Authors [Robert J. Parsons, Publisher]

-

Preserved here are two pages from the Newfoundland Patriot. It contains a report on the Benevolent Irish Society and their efforts to take over an ‘orphan asylum school’, several letters to the editor, an excerpt from an American paper on the Sisters of Charity, and several anecdotal tales, including one about Napoleon.
246-247

21 Jan. 1832

G. R. Robinson

Viscount Howick

With reference to the Assembly which has been requested by the people of Newfoundland, Robinson notes that the Secretary of State and the Colonies has drafted documents for this to occur, based on similar precedents made in several colonies, such as Nova Scotia. However, Robinson quips that he feels the incident surrounding the granting of a Legislature shows ‘his’ (unsure to whom he refers) tragedy of paternalism toward a valuable colony. [He may be speaking of Cochrane, who did resist the creation of the Legislature]
248-249v

25 Jan. 1832

Viscount Howick

G. R. Robinson

Howick is pleased to inform Robinson that Goderich has given instruction to form a Commission to gather and empower a Legislative Assembly for Newfoundland. He notes that he hopes this will be completed, with the aid of Gov. Cochrane during the spring, based upon previous governing structures found in Nova Scotia and New Brunswick. Howick then assures Robinson that he had not been avoiding the issue and the petitions of the people, but rather did not wish to promise anything while things were still quite undecided.
250-251

23 July. 1832

[Viscount] Melbourne

Viscount Goderich

Melbourne notes that he has been charged with giving a series of petitions to Goderich from the Inhabitants of Newfoundland. Melbourne suggests that the Legislature might not even be called upon
251v-254

-

-

-

Attached: A group of petitions from the citizens of Conception Bay, Port-of-Grave, and Old Perlican on the issue of Newfoundland receiving a Legislative Assembly.
255

5 March, 1832

-

-

Records that Mr. Robinson gave the aforementioned petitions to Howick, which were then passed to Goderich.
256

14 April, 1832

-

-

Another note stating that Mr. Robinson had given more information to Howick on these matters.

S

258-258v

9 Feb. 1832

James Simms

R.W Hay

Upon having spoken to the Governor, Simms requests leave from Hay to travel to England and present to Hay the report on the Indicative Laws of Newfoundland. He then references that some of the information in the report has not been covered in depth, as he has already explained in a previous report.
261-307

Feb. 1832

-

-

The Report of the H.M Attorney-General of Newfoundland on the Indicative Laws of that Colony. Firstly, Simms notes that, the central purpose of these laws have yet to be effectively fulfilled. Secondly, he questions the ability to have such a set of laws applied, due to the colony’s distance. He then moves to explain the long history of these laws and those people behind them. In doing this, Simms refers to countless other secondary reports which established and reviewed these laws. He then offers several suggestions to combat the deficiencies of this law.

T

311

27 Jan. 1832

-

-

This note records that Thomas Tro[n]bridge presents himself before Hay and Cochrane.
312

29 Jan. 1832

Budget Secretary

Sec. of State for the Colonies

This notice has been appended to a letter, the one which precedes the current letter, to let the Sec. of State know that the sender was too poor to afford the postage for this letter. Thus it is hoped that the Sec. of State will show his generosity to the author of the aforementioned letter.
313-314v

19 March, 1832

Joseph Templeman

Sec. of State for the Colonies

Joseph Templeman has written and signed his own memorial, asking for the position of the deceased Mr. Holbrook as Surveyor-General. He notes that he is currently the ‘Acting Surveyor’ with the consent of Tucker and Hay and cites many things to prove his worth, including comments from Former Gov. Hamilton.
315-315v

16 Feb. 1825 [Copy]

Charles Hamilton

Earl Bathurst

Attached: An excerpt of a letter from Hamilton to Bathurst which extols the virtues of Templeman and a colleague. In Hamilton’s opinion, both of these men, due to their services to the Crown, deserve appointment as Clerks.
316

28 Feb. 1825

R.W Horton

Thomas Cochrane

Attached: This letter notes that the one previous to it is indeed an excerpt from Hamilton and conveys his sentiments to Gov. Cochrane.
317

22 May, 1832

R.W Hay

Joseph Templeman

Hay alerts Templeman that Sec. Murray knew nothing of the need for a new appointment in Newfoundland and has decided to take Mr. Templeman under his consideration.

W

322, 323v

21 Aug. 1832

Charles Walton

Sec. of the Colonial Dept.

Walton begs leave to send the Department a certificate which notes the passage of two convicts from Newfoundland to Plymouth. They are transported by Capt. Buchan of the Forte. On the following page, there is a copy of the certificate which notes the aforementioned passage.

"Poole Merchants, see also N Lester".

325-326

30 Jan. 1832

The Merchants of Poole

Viscount Goderich

The memorial of the "Merchants of Poole who engage in trade with the Island of Newfoundland and have establishments at the Out-Harbours of the Island" begins by expressing their lament over the proposed formation of a Legislative Government in Newfoundland. The petitioners worry that this will affect their trade and businesses in the Out-Harbours because of the concentration of power in St. John’s. The Merchants want Goderich to record their concerns into legislation allowing the representation of the inhabitants of Newfoundland.
328-338

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-

-

An Index listing and summarizing all the letters in this volume.

End of Volume