CO 194/83 [Reel B-534]

Page

Date

From whom (where)

To whom (where)

Contents or nature of the document

Newfoundland 1832 Ė Vol: 1 January to December - President Tucker & Sir Thomas Cochrane

President Tucker

5

2 Jan. 1832

R.A. Tucker

Viscount Goderich

Informing Goderich that he is transmitting a copy of the dockets of dispatches from January to December 1831.

7-9

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Attached: a return of the aforementioned dockets of dispatches.

10-11

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Attached: A list of letters from the Colonial Department to Newfoundland, unanswered or unacknowledged for the period between January and June 1831.

12-16v

14 Jan. 1832

R.A. Tucker

Viscount Goderich

Regarding a statute relating to Catholic emancipation. The statute was deemed by the court of Newfoundland to be non-applicable in the colony of Newfoundland, and thus, Catholics would continue to suffer the civil disabilities that Protestant England had imposed on them. Upon word of this, Roman Catholic public meetings often began to be characterised by feelings of irritation and resentment towards the Newfoundland administration. Robert Hay intervened by sending a letter that the Catholic Relief Act of Parliament would be implemented in Newfoundland. This has not been followed through and Tucker now writes Goderich to implore him to take action soon. He then petitions on the behalf of the Irish residents of St. Johnís. Several years ago, the St. Johnís Charity School was established to educate the poor children of the town. It was a non-religious school since many of the poor were either Roman Catholics or Protestant dissenters (i.e. non-Anglicans). Encouraged by its success, the Benevolent Irish society also started a charity school dedicated to Catholics. However, unlike the other charity school, it did not receive government funding, and is now having trouble funding the operation. Tucker requests that ₤100 per annum be sent to school for support.

18-19v

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The Newfoundlander

-

Attached: an article recounting the 25th annual report of the Benevolent Irish Society. It addresses the difficulties of providing charitable aid and financially keeping afloat. The charity school is their greatest expense and they require aid if it is to stay open. Two other short articles are also included regarding the difficulty of financing the charity school.

21

25 Jan. 1832

R.A. Tucker, Government House, St. Johnís

Viscount Goderich

Transmitting the minutes of His Majestyís Council of Newfoundland for the half-year ending December 21, 1831.

23-23v

26 Jan. 1832

R.A. Tucker, Government House

Viscount Goderich

Transmitting the Return of the Fishery and the Return of the Imports and Exports of the island for 1831. The Returns have been sent late because of a delay in having them received from some of the distant districts.

25-25v

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Attached: "Return of the Fishery and Inhabitants of the Island of Newfoundland in the Year Ending 30th June 1831." A table listing various information including the number and nationality of vessels fishing in Newfoundland, the number and type of fish caught, and various statistics on the population. Two other tables are included on the Herring fishery and the Seal fishery specifically.

26-26v

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Attached: tables showing the exports and imports of the colony.

27-27v

1 March 1832

R.A. Tucker, Government House

Viscount Goderich

A letter on behalf of Joshua Greene, collector of customs in Port-de-Grave requesting two months leave of absence in order to travel to a warmer climate for the benefit his health. Tucker informs Goderich that he has granted the request.

29-31

12 March 1832

R.A. Tucker, Government House

Viscount Goderich

Regarding an order from Goderich dated 1 December 1831 commanding Cochrane to dispose of the property of the old government house once he has moved into the new one. Tucker reports that this has not been done and much of the property is now in decay but he nonetheless has been able to turn the buildings into a barracks and canteen and auction off much of the material, but at much decreased value due to the decay. He then turns his attention to the new government house which is in need of alterations and improvements to remain comfortable in the harsh Newfoundland climate which has already caused the building to leak.

33-36

13 March 1832

R.A. Tucker, Government House

Viscount Goderich

Regarding the relief of the poor by Government in the harsh winter of 1832. A combination of poor weather, poor clothing, and a bad summer fishery has caused many of the poor of St. Johnís to take sick and even die. However, Tucker believes it is the result of the habit of Newfoundlanders to not prepare for the future. This habit he attributes to the Irish immigrants and the nature of the fishery. He believes the best remedy to this would be to establish a good savings bank which would allow the inhabitants to learn to save for the future.

37-39

14 March 1832

R.A. Tucker, Government House

Viscount Goderich

Copy of a letter from Tucker informing Goderich that Surveyor General Holbrook has died leaving behind a wife and three young children to survive on a pension of ₤40 per annum. Tucker is inclined to help the family of so faithful a servant and makes suggestions as to how the Government might help them.

41-44v

16 March 1832

R.A. Tucker, Government House

Viscount Goderich

Regarding a gathering near Harbour Grace in January of 3,000 fishermen for the purpose of addressing the "truck system" and various measures taken by merchants to regulate the seal fishery. The meeting was peaceful which prompted Tucker to refrain from sending police to the second meeting in February. Days after the second meeting however, a mob of over 150 men attacked a ship of one of their opponents. Unable to send soldiers in the present season, Tucker has sent a proclamation stating that the said act was illegal and a reward of ₤100 is offered to anyone who turns in those who perpetrated the crime. The perpetrators are now employed in the seal fishery and Tucker informs Goderich that a circuit court will be established there soon so further disturbances are unlikely.

45

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A hastily written and short letter stating that Mr. Lester should be informed that the local government has done what they can do to repair the sail [presumably the sail damaged by the mob in the previous letter.]

46-47

17 March 1832

R.A. Tucker, Government House

Viscount Goderich

Transmitting a further request on behalf of the family of Mr. Holbrook to receive some aid from Government.

48-48v

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James Crowdy, Colonial Secretary

A petition from many inhabitants of Newfoundland on behalf of the Holbrook family requesting that Tucker forward the letter to Viscount Goderich and that Goderich may find the goodness to reward the family of so valuable and faithful a servant as George Holbrook.

50-51

19 March 1832

R.A. Tucker, Government House

Viscount Goderich

Discussing the Blue Book for 1831. He apologises that certain information could not be provided from some districts due the very unsettled nature of the colony. He also apologises that he was not able to add detailed comments as a result of an illness from which he is just now recovering.

52-53v

20 March 1832

R.A. Tucker, Government House

Viscount Goderich

Responding to a request from Goderich dated 30 October 1831 asking for a return of the public schools of Newfoundland. He informs Goderich that while the education for the poor is quite good as a result of charitable societies, the children of other classes, specifically those of civil servants, are unable to obtain an education suitable to their class. Thus, he argues, that it is essential to establish an academy in St. Johnís so the children of government officials will not have to be sent away for a decent education.

54

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Attached: the requested return showing various statistics on the schools in Newfoundland.

55-56v

21 March 1832

R.A. Tucker, Government House

Viscount Goderich

Acknowledging the receipt of the rapist Michael Fogartyís pardon from the death sentence on the condition that he be sent to New South Wales or Van Diemenís Land (Tasmania). No ship is heading directly from Newfoundland to Australia and thus Tucker is inclined to send Fogarty on the colonial vessel Forte to England and then on a convict ship to Australia afterwards. He also believes that the sending of this vessel will allow for some quick correspondence in some matter, or an early return of Governor Cochrane.

57

21 March 1832

[James Crowdy, Colonial Secretary], Government House

R.W. Hay

Requesting that the accompanying letter be forwarded to Mr. Cochrane with the first dispatches to be sent to the colonial office in Gibraltar.

59-59v

21 April 1832

R.A. Tucker, Government House

Viscount Goderich

Transmitting the memorial of acting Chief Justice Brenton.

61-66

18 April 1832

Edward Brenton, St. Johnís

Viscount Goderich

Attached: the memorial of Edward Brenton. After recounting his long service in many important offices in the British North American colonies, Brenton requests that he may obtain the position of Chief Justice of Newfoundland if it were to become vacant.

67-68v

30 April 1832

R.A. Tucker, Government House

Viscount Goderich

Transmitting an application from the Mechanics Society of St. Johnís. Tucker has thrown his support behind this society and others like it because of their goal of relieving the working class of their misfortunes.

69-69v

17 April 1832

Mechanicís Society

Richard Alexander Tucker

Attached: the memorial of the Mechanics Society requesting that the government financially support their application for a stone building which will be used to accommodate the societyís meetings.

70

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J. Templeman, Acting Surveyor General

Richard Alexander Tucker

Attached: a report on the lot requested by the Mechanics society.

71-71v

3 May 1832

R.A. Tucker, Government House

Viscount Goderich

Transmitting an address from many of the inhabitants of St. Johnís to the King and praising the loyalty of the population to their sovereign.

73

1 May 1832

Buchan on behalf of the Inhabitants of St. Johnís

The Kingís Most Excellent Majesty

Attached: the aforementioned address thanking His Majesty for his paternal care in granting Newfoundland a charter of liberties.

74

5 June 1832

R.A. Tucker, Government House

Viscount Goderich

Informing Goderich that he is sending his observations on the Blue Book transmitted in March. At the time, he was unable to give his observations due to an illness.

76-76v

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Lord Howick

A hastily scribbled letter regarding a report by a committee on the internal affairs of Newfoundland. The writer believes that Newfoundland taxes are already very low and do not need to be reduced further.

77-81

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R.A. Tucker, Government House

 

Tuckerís comments on the Blue book. He gives his observations on the civil establishment, finances, the judiciary, the Church, education, agriculture, and many other subjects.

83-84

7 June 1832

R.A. Tucker, Government House

Viscount Goderich

Informing Goderich that he is transmitting copies of correspondence between the Acting Chief Judge and the High Sheriff regarding the securities of Capt. Buchan. Tucker apologises for the delay in sending these letters which he had intended to do upon receiving them but was unable to do so as the result of his illness and subsequent heavy workload.

85

31 Dec. 1831

James Crowdy, Secretaryís Office

The Acting Chief Judge

Attached: a copy of a letter asking the Acting Chief Judge for his opinion on the reappointment of Captain Buchan as High Sheriff and requesting that he obtain Buchanís opinion.

85v-86v

2 Jan. 1832

E.B. Brenton, Acting Chief Judge, Judgesí Chambers

R.A. Tucker

Attached: a copy of a letter responding to the question in the previous letter of whether or not Buchan should make "a fresh bond" upon his reappointment. The judges believe that fresh bonds should indeed be made for the reappointment for they believe the previous bonds expired with the previous appointment.

87-88

7 Jan. 1832

D. Buchan

James Crowdy

Owing to the problems in finding someone to replace Mr. Brooking, Buchan has been slow to reply. He does not agree with the bond decision for it limits his freedom.

88

9 March 1832

H. Reynolds, Treasury Chambers

David Buchan

A letter asking for information about the security bonds.

89-90

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Attached: the document spelling out the conditions of the original bonds for Buchan.

91-92

12 June 1832

R.A. Tucker, Government House

Viscount Goderich

Transmitting a memorial from Mr. Broom, chief magistrate of St. Johnís regarding a government lot in that town.

93-94v

6 June, 1832

John Broom, St. Johnís

Viscount Goderich

Attached: Referencing his past loyalty and service to the Crown, Broom brings his case to Goderich. Broom leased a lot from the Crown and built houses upon it and invested upwards of ₤1000 in it. In 1825, it was consumed by the great fire and he was left with the expense of paying the rent and the fee of renewing his lease. He now solicits Goderich to alleviate his suffering by abating the rent or at least removing the fee for renewing the lease.

96-98v

19 June 1832

R.A. Tucker, Government House

Viscount Goderich

Regarding the severe weather which has plagued the island for the past three months. Ice still covers many bays making communication and transportation difficult. The fishery has also been delayed and thus a famine is liable to occur if the Government does not intervene. Thus, Tucker has taken the liberty to dispatch a schooner to distribute potatoes and bread in the north. However, he informs Goderich that he has been told that such long winters have frequently been succeeded by a very prosperous cod fishery.

100-103v

12 June 1832

James Crowdy (By Command of President Tucker), Secretaryís Office, St. Johnís

Mr. Peter Le Messurier

Attached: The instructions given to Peter Le Messurier who has been selected to deliver the government aid to the outports. The chief purpose of the mission is to distribute potatoes for feed. Bread is only included in the shipment for the neediest inhabitants. Molasses is to be distributed in small quantities to the elderly, sick, and very young children.

105-105v

22 June 1832

R.A. Tucker, Government House

Viscount Goderich

Regarding Chief Clerk Charles Archibaldís leave of absence which expired May 1st. Tucker hopes that Goderich will continue to understand Archibaldís circumstances and remain lenient with him.

107

25 June 1832

R.A. Tucker, Government House

Viscount Goderich

Complying with a command to send an account of the fees payable of all commissions and appointments in the colony for review by the House of Commons.

109-109v

25 June 1832

R.A. Tucker, Government House

Viscount Goderich

Attached: The aforementioned account of fees payable of all commissions and appointments in the colony.

111

4 July 1832

R.A. Tucker, Government House

Viscount Goderich

Informing Goderich that he is transmitting the minutes of His Majestyís Council for the Island of Newfoundland for the past six months ending June 30th.

113

5 July 1832

R.A. Tucker, Government House

Viscount Goderich

Informing Goderich that he is sending the Return of Dispatches from the Colonial Department between July 1st and December 31st 1831 which have not been answered or acknowledged.

115-116

1 July 1832

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Attached: the aforementioned return of dispatches which are unanswered or unacknowledged.

117-117v

25 July 1832

R.A. Tucker, Government House

Viscount Goderich

Informing Goderich that he is transmitting a letter from Acting Chief Justice Brenton. He recommends that a gratuity of half of the sum held by the Kingís Agent for Newfoundland be paid to Brenton as a reward for temporarily assuming the arduous position of Chief Justice

119-120v

24 July 1832

E.B. Brenton, St. Johnís

President Tucker

Attached: While Assistant Judge, in addition to his regular salary, Brenton received half-pay as a reduced Deputy Judge Advocate. Upon assuming the position of Acting Chief Judge he retained his salary as Assistant judge but no longer received his half-pay. Since the work of Chief Judge is more difficult than his previous work, he requests that he be entitled to greater earnings.

122-123v

30 July 1832

R.A. Tucker, Government House

Viscount Goderich

Responding to the instructions of the Lords of the Treasury who requested that all returns and accounts be forwarded to them so they could perceive the full expenses of the colony. Tucker argues that these returns and accounts need only be sent once a year because due to the poor communication on the island in certain months, quarterly reports would be extremely difficult to produce.

124-126v

2 Aug. 1832

R.A. Tucker, Government House

Viscount Goderich

An update on the schooner that was sent to the northern outports to deliver food to the inhabitants suffering from the severe weather. He informs Goderich that he is sending several accounts of the terrible situation for his consideration. While the fishery is doing very well, the weather will likely destroy the potato crop for this year and some inhabitants are causing disturbances in areas where civil force is lacking.

128-153v

11 Aug. 1832

J. McGoun, St. Johnís

The President

The aforementioned account of John McGoun recounting the events which transpired during his voyage and the condition of the inhabitants encountered.

154

3 May 1832

Newman and Richard

James Crowdy

Attached: reporting a disturbance in Little Saint Lawrence in Placentia Bay in which a mob raided a government house and were only subdued by the distribution of government provisions by the officer there.

154v-155v

16 June 1832

William Bennett, St. Johnís

R.A. Tucker

Attached: a memorial by William Bennett, a St. Johnís merchant. He brings to Tuckerís attention the case of one of his brigs carrying wares for the fishing season which was overtaken and robbed by a mob in Grateís Cove. The merchant and a constable went onboard to implore the mob to stop plundering and offered them a reward. One man among the mob claimed to be a constable and with a heavy staff argued they had a right to the merchandise. The mob continued plundering and subsequently burned the ship. Bennett now asks that justice be carried out.

156-157v

23 July 1832

Edward Joseph Mallowney

R.A. Tucker

Attached: currently an agent for the House of Trade for James MacBraine in Kingís Cove, Bonavista Bay, Mallowney gives an account of a situation which occurred in June. At that time the store in Kingís Cove was surrounded by starving inhabitants who demanded that they be given provisions. The agent for fear of his life and his employerís property distributed rations amongst fifty families until the ice in the bay melted. The summer agent now requests compensation from the government.

158-163

11 Aug. 1832

R.A. Tucker, Government House

Viscount Goderich

Regarding a cholera scare on the island after news of an outbreak in Europe and America reached the island. Tucker discusses the difficulty of quarantining the island and the measures taken to prevent, and deal with possible cholera outbreaks.

164-164v

31 March 1832

J. Crowdy

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Attached: A proclamation from Tucker stating that no communication is to be had with any ship from the Baltic, Hamburg, or "any port or place" in the United Kingdom until they have been deemed quarantined.

165

3 May 1832

James Crowdy

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Attached: A proclamation stating that health officers will be appointed to inspect ships entering the harbour.

166

4 July 1832

Jas. Crowdy

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Attached: In light of recent news that cholera has spread to the Canadas and the United States, stricter measures are being taken to prevent its spread to Newfoundland.

166v

17 July 1832

Jas. Crowdy

Attached: A proclamation imploring the inhabitants of the colony to adopt all measures to ensure cleanliness of their living space which should help to prevent the spread of the disease

167-167v

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Attached: printed minutes from a meeting chaired by High Sheriff David Buchan making resolutions about how to deal with cholera. They believe it is largely the prerogative of individuals to adopt healthy habits and comply with government activities to prevent the spreading of the disease to Newfoundland.

167v-168

9,10, 13 Aug. 1832

Jas. Crowdy

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Attached: Instructions to Frederick Elliot and George Gaden listing their duties as Health Officers.

170-172

21 Aug. 1832

R.A. Tucker

Viscount Goderich

Reporting that a fire has destroyed the town of Harbour Grace. Tucker and the chief military engineer, Lt. Col. Oldfield visited the town personally and found it in a "heap of ruins." The fire started in a house and rapidly spread to a wooden building full of gunpowder which exploded. He now informs Goderich that he is immediately sending the inhabitants aid and will keep him updated on his efforts.

174-177

24 Sept. 1832

R.A. Tucker

Viscount Goderich

Regarding his exclusion from the succession upon the death or retirement of Governor Cochrane. He wishes that measures be taken to ensure that the inhabitants do not assume that it is because of unsatisfactory performance as acting governor in the past which is not the case.

178-179

20 Nov. 1832

R.A. Tucker

Viscount Goderich

Upon hearing the news from Nova Scotia that the Collector of Customs for that colony has succeeded the former Governor Tucker writes to acquaint Goderich that this will give people in Newfoundland the impression that subordinate officers frequently take over government upon the death or absence of the Governor. This will lead them to think that Tucker has been excluded because of his unsatisfactory performance as Acting Governor.

Sir Thomas Cochrane

182

8 Jan. 1832

Thomas Cochrane, Paris

Viscount Goderich

Informing Goderich that he is transmitting a request by the inhabitants of St. Johnís.

184

29 Sept. 1831

1014 Signatures

The Kingís Most Excellent Majesty

Attached: The aforementioned petition from the inhabitants of St. Johnís requesting a local legislature resembling those given to the other colonies.

185

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767 Signatures

The Kingís Most Excellent Majesty

Attached: Another petition citing Newfoundlandís rapid growth and potential as reasons to give the colony a legislative government.

186-188

23 Jan. 1832

Thomas Cochrane, Paris

Viscount Goderich

Upon being informing by Lord Howick that Goderich is considering the aforementioned petitions, Cochrane writes to state his opinion on the subject as well as make other remarks about Newfoundland, including the bad weather.

190

9 Feb. 1832

Thomas Cochrane, Paris

Viscount Goderich

Complying with a request by Lord Howick to state when he left Newfoundland. Cochraneís agent informs him that it was on the 5th [February 1831?].

192-194

14 Feb. 1832

Thomas Cochrane, Paris

Viscount Goderich

Responding to a letter from Goderich requesting his opinion on the possibility of opening a market-place in St. Johnís. Cochrane says that he is quite in favour of the proposal and hopes it will go ahead.

Sir Thomas Cochrane: Death of His Father and his Return to his Government

196-198v

27 March 1832

Thomas Cochrane, London

Viscount Goderich

Sending information on the so called "ship rooms" in St. Johnís. He explains to Goderich that they are plots of land set aside for fishermen from the United Kingdom and gives the history of these lots so as Goderich can judge the applications of certain inhabitants of St. Johnís regarding the lots.

199-200

8 April 1832

Thomas Cochrane, London

Viscount Howick

A response to a letter from Howick regarding the application for an appointment of a Solicitor General to Newfoundland. Cochrane details the necessity of one. Note: the text is significantly faded and difficult to read.

201-202

5 May 1832

Thomas Cochrane, Edinburgh

Viscount Howick

Regarding the death of Mr. Holbrook and the appointment of John Haly to fill his position of Surveyor General. Cochrane argues that while the young man is not educated in surveying, he should receive the appointment so as to alleviate the poverty of his father, Col. Haly, a very loyal and respected military man who has run into hard times.

203-204v

12 May 1832

Thomas Cochrane, London

Viscount Goderich

Giving his opinion on the application of Captain Buchan to be relieved of the necessity of entering into securities as part of his fulfilment of office. He also gives his opinion on some issues with the charter of the colony relating to the office of High Chief Sheriff.

205-205v

July 20 1832

Thomas Cochrane, West Cowes

Viscount Goderich

Complying with Goderichís order to transmit the points which Cochrane has asked for direction from Goderich.

207-210v

Thomas Cochrane

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Attached: A memorandum detailing the points on which Cochrane requested Goderich to make a decision on.

211-212

24 July 1832

Thomas Cochrane

Lord Howick

A letter regarding the transmission of certain dispatches and Cochraneís irritation at being put up in hotels in sea ports.

213-213v

30 July 1832

Thomas Cochrane, on board the Forte

Viscount Goderich

Informing Goderich that he has embarked for Newfoundland and has received Goderichís dispatches nos. 15, 16, and 17 and will comply with their requests on his return to Newfoundland.

215-216

18 Aug. 1832

Thomas Cochrane, the Forte at sea

Viscount Goderich

Now that the establishment of a legislature is going ahead, Cochrane believes that the first issue that will be legislated on will be the act of judicature. Cochrane asks Goderichís opinion on changing that act.

217-220

20 Sept. 1832

Thomas Cochrane, St. Johnís

Viscount Goderich

A letter detailing the implementation of legislative government since his arrival on the island on the 26th of August. He details the progress as well as the difficulties which the colony poses to effective governance.

221-222v

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Sir Thomas Cochrane

William IV

Attached: A proclamation outlining some of the details regarding the establishment of a local legislature.

223-232

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Sir Thomas Cochrane

William IV

Attached: A proclamation listing the rules regarding elections in the new legislative government and the oaths and duties of certain officers.

233-234

3 Sept. 1832

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Attached: Minutes of Council discussing the above proclamations and listing and defining the electoral districts. The council asks if islands lying off the districts are included in those districts.

235-237

8 Oct. 1832

Thomas Cochrane, St. Johnís

Viscount Goderich

Informing Goderich that he is forwarding a petition from the struggling inhabitants of Harbour Grace who have been reduced to beggary by the fire and the destruction of their potato crops.

239-239v

22 Sept. 1832

R.A. Tucker, Judges Chambers

His Excellency The Governor

Attached: a short letter from Tucker stating that he is forwarding to Cochrane the petition by the Harbour Grace inhabitants and asks him to take care to forward it to Viscount Goderich.

241

He Inhabitants of Harbour Grace

King William IV

Attached: the petition from the inhabitants of Harbour Grace explaining that the Episcopal Church, and most of the mercantile structures were destroyed, depriving them of their living. They request that the King be kind enough to dispense a sum for the relief of the inhabitants and cite actions by his predecessor and brother in relieving distress in St. Johnís, New Brunswick, and the "West India Islands."

242

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Attached to the Petition: A list of damages and the estimated funds needed to compensate each sufferer listed.

243-244

9 Oct. 1832

Thomas Cochrane, St. Johnís

Viscount Goderich

Informing Goderich that he is transmitting a copy of a communication with the Lieutenant General of Nova Scotia on the subject of the military garrison in Newfoundland. Cochrane requests that Goderich give this communication serious attention.

245-247

1 Sept. 1832

Thomas Cochrane, St. Johnís

Lieut. Gen. Sir P. Maitland

Requesting that Maitland give his serious attention to the attached statement on the garrison in Newfoundland. He states that the garrison is lacking in troops and requests that it be strengthened soon to deal with civil disorder which has been a problem to control due to the deficiency in soldiers.

248-249

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Attached: Statement on the numbers and conditions of the troops on island.

250-253v

15 Oct. 1832

Thomas Cochrane, St. Johnís

Viscount Goderich

Informing him that he is transmitting a letter from Chief Justice Tucker. He gives various comments on the letter and feels that he must contradict Tucker on the points he makes in the letter. He gives criticism on the administration of government by Tucker in his absence arguing that he assented to any application which was presented to him.

254-256v

31 Aug. 1832

R.A. Tucker, St. Johnís

Viscount Goderich

Attached: Requesting Goderich give a sum of money to his secretary Mr. Crowdy and his two assistants, Mr. Templeman and Mr. Ayre who worked extra laboriously during his time as acting governor.

258-259

16 Oct. 1832

Thomas Cochrane, St. Johnís

Viscount Goderich

Informing Goderich of a company of soldiers from the 96th Regiment and that they are in even greater numbers than he requested. However, he regrets that more naval assistance was not supplied

260

20 Oct.

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A short letter about the new constitution and the state of poverty.

261-267

29 Oct. 1832

Thomas Cochrane, St. Johnís

Viscount Goderich

Informing Goderich that he is transmitting a letter from Mr. Tucker. He then brings Goderichís attention to a dispute between Tucker and himself in 1828 regarding a claim by Tucker to part of the allowances given to the Governor while he was absent. He then explains the circumstances surrounding this dispute. He also accuses Tucker of misusing the allowance that was given in Cochraneís absence by burning the coal intended for Government House in his own home while he states his own good record of using the allowance only when necessary.

269-270v

7 July 1823

J.C. Henries, Treasury Chambers

Admiral Sir Charles Hamilton

Attached: A letter from the Treasury Board spelling out the conditions of the governorís allowance. The allowance is stated to be the average amount of supplies consumed annually by government house, and as such, in the governorís absence, the amount of requisitioned supplies will not increase.

271-271v

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Attached: a section of the Kingís instructions on the governorís allowance regarding the governorís absence. In the case of his absence, the Lieutenant Governor or President of Council will receive half of the governorís salary and any "prerequisites and emoluments" which would otherwise become due shall be paid.

273-277

4 Sept. 1832

R.A. Tucker, St. Johnís

Viscount Goderich

Tucker informs Goderich that he had interpreted a rule stating that the Acting Governor is to receive half-salary and any emoluments to mean that he is entitled to half the allowance as well. He also assumed that when said allowance was not completely used, that it became a savings surplus and he used the coals in said allowance for his own family saying that he would treat it as a loan if he was in fact not allowed to be used as a surplus. He now asks Goderich for the proper regulations regarding absentee allowances.

279-286v

20 Nov. 1832

Thomas Cochrane, St. Johnís

Viscount Goderich

Informing Goderich that he is sending two letters from Commander Pearl and giving his opinions thereon. The first letter entails a large grant of land to Comm. Pearl which was given to him on the condition that he build a road to the region for the convenience of the neighbours. Cochrane states that he soon regretted the decision due to the improper conduct of Comm. Pearl. Pearl even claims to have known nothing of the agreement to build a road. Cochrane then turns to Pearlís second letter by refuting the accusations of Pearl against him and reminding Goderich of Pearlís dishonourable past and attempts to defame Cochrane in England by starting rumours.

287-288

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Attached: a statement on the dispute between Pearl and Cochrane about the land grant. It says that Pearl claimed that the requirement to build a road to the very good farmland around his plot is a violation of the agreement. The writer sides with Cochrane in saying that it is completely lawful to do so because all granters in that particularly rich area are required to take part in the construction of the road. It then addresses Pearlís second letter in which he complains about being told the governor could not receive him upon his return from England. The writer agrees again with Cochrane stating that Pearl appears to be a "very troublesome fellow." They trace Pearlís dislike towards Cochrane to Cochraneís exposure of Pearlís fraudulent activities and his refusal to appoint him private secretary.

289-290

20 Oct. 1832

James Pearl

James Crowdy

Attached: a letter by Pearl giving his side of the story. He claims not a word was mentioned about his having to construct a road at his own expense through his land. It is thus unlawful for Cochrane to suggest that he do so now. He says that if he had been told that building a road was part of the settlement, he would never have accepted it.

291-293

18 Oct. 1832

James Pearl

Viscount Goderich

Attached: Pearl gives an account of when Cochrane had resumed his position of Governor, he felt obliged to visit him at Government House. The Orderly delivered the message to the Governor and returned to inform Pearl that Cochrane was unable to receive any visits for the day. Pearl left but was soon pursued by Cochraneís Colonial Secretary Campbell who stated that Cochrane did not want to receive any visits at all from Pearl. He believes that this insulting treatment is a continuation of Cochraneís poor treatment of him based upon the accusation that he spread rumours about him in England. Pearl suggests Goderich call an investigation to prove Cochrane wrong and asks for protection from such disgraceful treatment.

294-299

27 Oct. 1832

Templeman, Acting Surveyor General

James Crowdy

Responding to Cochraneís request to give a report on the situation addressed in Pearlís letters. As Acting Surveyor General, he restates Cochraneís regulations with regards to constructing a road on the lots in the area and gives a detailed account of the events surrounding Pearlís disregard towards those regulations. He also gives further evidence that Pearl, as well as all the other residents, had to be aware of the regulations and that Pearl is thus out of line in his statements that this stipulation was not in the original deal.

300-300v

Oct. 1832

S.H. Thomas, St. Johnís

James Crowdy, Colonial Secretary

A letter from one of the other granters in the area in question answering a number of queries from the Governor. The answers supply further evidence that the granters had knowledge beforehand that they held their lots on the condition that they construct a road through them.

302

31 Oct. 1832

St. Johnís [Signature faded]

James Crowdy

A letter stating that Pearl made no portion of the road required to be constructed.

304-304v

1 July 1831

James Pearl, Mount Cochrane, near St. Johnís

John Campbell, Secretary

Upon received a letter asking him to pay rent for his plot of land, Pearl informs Campbell that because of the recent fire which has destroyed his building materials, he cannot construct the road, which, according to a previous statement, entitles him to less rent until he does so.

305

5 July 1831

J. Campbell, Secretaryís Office, St. Johnís

James Pearl

Responding to the above letter from Pearl, Campbell conveys Cochraneís command that in light of the exceptional circumstances, the rent be remitted and that a delay in the construction of the road be permissible so long that he completes the road by the 1st November 1832.

306-306v

24 Nov. 1832

Thomas Cochrane, St. Johnís

Viscount Goderich

Transmitting an application from Assistant Judge DesBarres for an allowance of table money for his circuit to Harbour Grace in 1826. He is only now bringing this up because the former constitution did not allow for such allowances. Cochrane asks for Goderichís opinion on what to do.

308-308v

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Restating the above in more detail and then determining that such applications should be referred to the local legislature.

310

26 Nov. 1832

DesBarres, St. Johnís Newfoundland

James Crowdy

Acknowledging the receipt of a letter conveying the Governorís decision not to give him the allowance incurred in 1826 due to the length of time that has elapsed since then and expressing his regrets at this decision.

312-317v

26 Nov. 1832

Thomas Cochrane, St. Johnís

Viscount Goderich

A letter bringing forth the question that has come about in council concerning the appointment of a deputy clerk to the council. He gives his opinions on the subject and the possibility of Mr. Crowdy taking the position.

319-320v

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E.J.H.

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The ruling on the case of the appointment of a deputy clerk to the council. Cochrane thinks that appointing Mr. Crowdy as secretary, member, and clerk of the council would be "inconvenient." This statement disagrees and says that there is no problem in having one officer holding three titles.

321-322

12 Dec. 1832

Thomas Cochrane, St. Johnís

Viscount Goderich

Presenting the case of Mr. Denson, Chief Magistrate of Harbour Grace whose house and all of his possessions were consumed by fire in a matter of minutes. He and his children escaped with nothing more than the clothes on their backs. He has sent aid so that this man and his family can eke out a living over the winter ahead and hopes that Goderich approves of his actions.

323-324v

31 Dec. 1832

Thomas Cochrane, St. Johnís

Viscount Goderich

Informing Goderich that he is transmitting a letter from Crowdy regarding his possible appointment to the office of Deputy Clerk of the Council. He gives his opinion on the possibility and emphasised the inconvenience the appointment would cause.

325-327v

26 Dec. 1832

James Crowdy, Secretaryís Office

Viscount Goderich

Crowdy explains that upon Cochraneís return, he was given word that he had been nominated as a member of His Majestyís Council and that he was to perform the duties of Deputy Clerk of that council. Cochrane would deny him the advantage of his three offices by claiming the right of appointing his secretary (Campbell) as acting Deputy of the Council. He contests Cochraneís argument that offices should not be so closely connected by arguing that more inconvenience would in fact arise from forcing separation of offices. He asks for decision on the matter from Goderich.

329-337

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An Index listing and summarising all the letters in this volume.

End of Volume