CO 194/79 [Reel B-697]

Page

Date

From whom(where)

To whom(where)

Contents or nature of the document

Newfoundland 1829 Public Offices and Miscellaneous

Admiralty

4

15 Apr 1829

Parry

Twiss

Asking him to look through the accompanying documents, and let him know whether he is disposed to apply for the charts Cochrane has requested.

6

15 Apr 1829

Parry

Barrow

Asking him to read that part of a letter from Capt. Buchan which is enclosed in a red bracket, and tell him how to proceed in obtaining the authority to send out the Charts required by Cochrane.

8-9

16 Feb 1829

Buchan (Newfoundland)

Capt. William Edward Parry, R.N

A letter from Buchan conveying the desire of Governor Cochrane to receive some charts divided into sections (N.1, N.2, and N.3) next summer of the Island from the Admiralty office. He then says that he is disappointed in not being able to obtain a leave of absence to England and complains about the fact that a return to England seems very unlikely.

10

?

Capt. William Edward Parry, R.N

-

List of charts wanted: the N3 category which is mostly comprised of south and western Newfoundland but also Labrador and Greenland.

11

?

Capt. William Edward Parry, R.N

-

Continuation of the list. The N1 category which apparently includes much of northern Newfoundland ranging from the Straight of Belle Isle and the coast of Labrador to Bonavista Bay.

11v

?

Capt. William Edward Parry, R.N

-

List of wanted N2 charts which include other areas of northern Newfoundland including St. Anthony harbour, La Scie Harbour

12

5 Dec 1829

-

-

A note on the enclosure of an Admiral Ogles Report on the Newfoundland and North American Fisheries. Vide Lower Canada.

Agent

14

10 May 1829

deVilliers

A.W. Hay

Remarks on Governor Cochraneís request for certain articles of stationery.

16-16v

15 May 1829 [received]

Bruce

-

Governor Cochraneís abovementioned request for stationery including an evidently odd request for mathematical instruments.

18-18v

31 May 1829

deVilliers

R.W. Hay

Regarding Cochraneís request, deVilliers explains that mathematical instruments are not in the power of the Stationery office to supply Ė asking whether he should find some other source from which to furnish it.

20-25

24 Nov 1829

deVilliers

R.W. Hay

Further Correspondence: more regarding the above. DeVilliers writes of the difficulty of acquiring requested supplies, a description of earlier events with Governors Sir Charles Hamilton and Cochrane. Gives accounts of other difficulties supplying the colony including the case of a widow, Mrs. Westcole, whose husband had been a civil-servant but had died and left her without a means of living in the colony. DeVilliers writes this letter to apparently refute some accusations against him.

Kingís Agent

27-28

5 March 1829

Robert Gwilt (Royal Hospital Chelsea, Agentís Office)

R.W. Hay

Regarding the salaries of a Mr. William Dickson, and a Mr. Christopher Ayre, asking that the board of commissioners for auditing the public accounts address their objections to their being paid their full salaries during their special leave of absence granted them by the governor to Mr. Murray, who if he rejects their objection he will then feel authorised to go ahead and pay them.

29-30

12 Aug 1829

Robert Gwilt (Royal Hospital Chelsea, Agentís Office)

R.W. Hay

Asking whether he should pay Mr. Busteed his full salary up to the 18 Feb, or only the 8, and also whether he should honour a bill drawn upon him by the Governor for the salary of Blaikie, now acting Chief Clerk.

31-31v

17 Nov 1829

Robert Gwilt (Royal Hospital Chelsea, Agentís Office)

R.W. Hay

Requesting permission to accept bills for James Simms for a moiety of his salary for his position of Attorney General, and for William Henry Bruce for his full salary. They were both on a leave of absence for part of the period they are requesting pay for. In the postscript he notes a third bill drawn on him by Bruce, asking to be paid for the same period as Clerk of HMís Council. Salaries listed on side of page.

33-34v

15 Dec 1829

Robert Gwilt (Royal Hospital, Chelsea)

R.W. Hay

Regarding the paying of £100 of Mr. Busteedís salary into the hands of the High Sheriff to fulfil a demand on him of public monies, and his doubts about whether he should accept such a bill.

Commander in Chief

36-36v

23 Aug 1829

R.W. Hay

General Lord Fitzroy Somerset

Transmitting a request from Cochrane to be informed as to whether he has the right as governor to make the appointment to the office of Fort Major in the event of a vacancy.

Board of Trade

39-39v

7 July 1829

Thomas Lack

R.W. Hay

Regarding a letter from Cochrane enclosing a petition from the Chamber of Commerce asking that St. Johnís be declared a free warehousing port, the Lords of the Privy Council for Trade state their intention to recommend such a declaration to HM.

Foreign Office

42-43

9 Jan 1829

J. Backhouse

R.W. Hay

Regarding Cochraneís letter reporting that the French were encroaching on the fishery in north-east Newfoundland, a letter from Stuart de Rothesay, the British ambassador to Paris related thereto, and a letter from the French Minister of Foreign Affairs to Rothesay.

44-45

29 Dec 1828

Stuart de Rothesay (Paris)

The Earl of Aberdeen

Further Correspondence: a copy of the aforesaid letter from the ambassador to Paris. Rothesay writes in response to a letter from the Earl of Aberdeen asking the ambassador to convey the complaints from the Governor of Newfoundland to the French Foreign Minister. Rothesay informs the Earl that in order to maintain cordial relations with the French minister, he decided not to make an official complaint, instead he brought it up in a letter.

46-46v

26 Dec 1828

M. De la Ferronays (Paris)

Stuart de Rothesay

Further Correspondence: Copy of a letter in French, enclosed with the above from de Rothesay. It is a short response from the French Foreign Minister to the letter that Rothesay sent saying that the issue will be taken up with the Ministre de la Marine.

48-49

24 Nov 1828

Charles Ogle, rear admiral and C in C.(Halifax)

John William Croker

Further Correspondence: a second enclosure, saying that he has found no encroachments by French or American fishermen, and that the Governor of St. Pierre has been very cooperative in maintaining the treaties inviolate.

Mr. Stephen

51-72v

28 May 1829

James Stephen Junior

R.W. Hay

Discussion of the Busteed affair. Stephen offers his opinion, based on a letter from Governor Cochrane to Sir George Murray, of the decision to suspend Mr. Busteed from his duties as Chief Clerk of the Supreme Court of Newfoundland. Trouble had arisen from a misunderstanding by Busteed of the contract which only entitled him to a salary of $400 per annum whereas he believed he was entitled to more than that depending on the fees of his office. Legal details of Busteedís case.

Navy Office

75

25 March 1829

Byam Martin

Hay

Saying that the schoolmasters may have passages with their wives provided they can embark at Deptford on Saturday.

Treasury

78

23 Feb 1829

J. Stewart

Hay

Stewart asks how much should Newfoundland magistrates be paid.

80-80v

11 July 1829

J. Stewart

Hay

The Lords commissioners of the Treasury see no grounds for further raising the salaries of the magistrates in Newfoundland.

82-83

12 Feb 1825

-

-

A printed circular regarding currencies and the rate of the dollar, as it pertains to the issuance of pay, in particular, to troops stationed in the colonies.

84

-

-

-

Further Correspondence: A printed table attached to the above of the Gross Weight, of the contents of Silver, and of the value computed at the rate of 5s. 2d. per oz. Troy, British Standard fineness, of various silver coins, together with the rate at which those coins are to be issued (in the absence of British Coin) for the pay of British Troops in the Colonies.

85

13 June 1829

Sean Dawson

Hay

Transmitting an order from the House of Commons to submit to Murray for such directions as he may think fit to give thereon and also that the Commissioners of the Customs have been directed to prepare and transmit the returns required by the said order.

87

12 June 1829

Ley

 

Further Correspondence: the order for a statement of the revenue accruing from duties on Imports, the rents of ships rooms, licenses, fines, and all other sources in the island, with the appropriation thereof during the last ten years, distinguishing each year separately.

88

19 June 1829

 

 

A note: "Grant towards building a lighthouse on Cape Ray Newfoundland". Vide Lower Canada.

89-89v

7 Oct 1829

Joseph Bante

Hay

Regarding a report of the estimates for various works and repairs in Newfoundland, the costs of building two new bridges, repairing the Government wharf etc.

91-92v

3 Nov 1829

Sean Dawson

Hay

Regarding the building of a new court house and gaol at Harbour Grace. They chose the more expensive option of stone, as the savings they would receive by building it out of wood would be too small to justify using such a material which is so given to decay in the Newfoundland climate, and would likely result in a greater expense in the future.

93-98

23 May 1828

R.B. Dean, M. Curt, S.G. Lushington, D. M. Binning

Regarding the ad valorem duty suggested to be imposed to pay for the erection of public buildings and other public expenses of Nfld. Opposition to this additional duty.

War Office

100-100v

29 Apr 1829

L. Sullivan

Hay

Requesting to be informed of the salary of the chief judge and acting chief judge of Nfld, as Mr. Brenton has been requesting his salary for such.

Society for the Propagation of the Gospel

103-104

19 June 1829

Anthony Hamilton, secretary

Murray

A memorial of the society regarding the lack of churches and charity schools, particularly in St. Johnís, where there is only one Established Church to seat 700 out of 11000 and the possibility of erecting new ones.

School Society

106-106v

Rec: 21 March 1829

Percival White, honorary secretary

Hay

Asking that they avail themselves of Bathurstís offer of transportation being provided for their school masters and mistresses.

108-108v

26 March 1829
(Rec: 26 March 1829)

White

Hay

Acknowledging his letter saying that their two school masters may have passage, with their wives, to Nfld, provided they can embark at Deptford on Saturday or on Monday, on which day the Ship will sail. Saying that regretfully it will be impossible on such short notice for the schoolmasters to avail themselves of the Governmentís kind offer.

110

25 Apr 1829

Samuel Codner

Murray

Regarding the extension of the societyís mandate, reflected in a change to their name: "The Newfoundland and British North America School Society".

114-115

11 July 1829

Codner

Murray

Regarding the journey of the superintendent of to Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, and the Canadas, requesting letters of introduction for him, and thanking him for his kindness to the Society.

A

117-118

22 June 1829

Stephen G., Adye, Colonel, Royal Artillery

Murray

Having been known to him, while with the army of occupation in France, he appeals on behalf of his brother-in-law, High Sheriff Captain Buchan, that he be given a leave of absence to return to England for a private affair at which he is needed. Writing, because he hears that Mr. Stephen has a different opinion about the Sheriffís losing his appointment should he leave the island, and hoping that he might also have a different view on that issue of his commission, and might allow him his leave.

119-119v

20 July 1829

Adye

Hay

Regarding the above, asking whether when Buchan temporarily resigns his commission, until he returns to Nfld to take it up again, he will receive his half pay as a military officer.

121-121v

17 Oct 1829

Charles Archibald

Hay

Thanking him for commissioning him in the role of Chief Clerk of the Supreme Court.

B

124-124v

29 Jan 1829

Blaikie, acting chief clerk & registrar of the SC of Nfld

Murray

His petition regarding his having been superseded in the promotion to the office of Chief Clerk by Busteed, that he now is acting Chief Clerk due to Busteedís suspension, and citing various proofs of his fitness for the position, desires that he be confirmed in it should Busteed not return to his office.

126-126v

27 Dec 1825

Hamilton

Further Correspondence: an attached letter of Hamiltonís appraising him highly for his conduct of the position.

128

26 Feb 1829

Bristowe, chairman

Murray

Transmitting, according to the resolution passed at a general meeting of merchants engaged in the Newfoundland fisheries at Poole, a copy of the report of their committee upon the alterations proposed by the Chamber of Commerce at St. Johnís, in the laws relating to Newfoundland now about to expire.

130-131v

Bristowe

 

Further Correspondence: a printed copy of the abovementioned report. The report defends the traditional relationship between Newfoundland fishermen and merchants. Because this system functions well, it is argued that the laws relating to this system be re-enacted. Suggestions to improve the Acts are also included.

132-132v

Rec: 4 Aug 1829

Brooks

Murray

Memorial of Mr. Brooks, regarding the attorney general of Nfldís claim to a piece of land belonging to himself. He hopes he will be allowed to retain ownership of his land.

134

26 Aug 1829

Bicknell & Roberts

Hay

Regarding a property whose owner has died, and whose heir and next of kin of their relative rights thereto.

Mr. Busteed

137-138v

3 Jan 1829

Busteed

Murray

Asking not for mercy, but for vindication Ė adamant in denying any guilt on his part, and arguing for his innocence and rectitude. Asking that if he is guilty, to punish him to the full measure of is transgression, but if he is innocent that he be vindicated in conscience and character.

139-139v

23 Apr 1829

Busteed

Murray

Announcing his arrival, after a two month trip, 32 days of which the vessel was stuck in the ice. Hoping to appear at the colonial office soon, and saying that if the Governor has made any untoward report of his official conduct, that he shall explain it so well as to retain the character with which his appointment honoured him.

141

6 May 1829

Busteed

Murray

Announcing his arrival in London, and saying that while he is not aware of any particular charge set against him, yet he feels that if any part of his official conduct may require explanation, that he will certainly do so to his satisfaction, and his own justification.

143-144v

9 June 1829

Busteed

Murray

Busteedís memorial. Regarding his unfortunate position, being in poor health, having received no income since his suspension, having only five months leave left, still not having attended to his poor and helpless family for which the leave was originally given, and also having incurred debts of upwards of £500. Trusting that his innocence will be upheld and maintained by his powerful influence, and asking furthermore that some remuneration might be granted him alongside to relieve the debts that he has accrued during his suspension and attempts to vindicate himself. Also, signifying that he gives no accusation towards Cochrane, believing that the Governor is acting from pure Ė albeit greatly mistaken Ė intentions.

145-145v

15 June 1829

Busteed

Hay

Saying, when asked for explanation, that he does not affix his private seal to official documents, but rather, he affixes the official seal of his office, which was approved of by the Judges and the Sheriff, and acquired for performing official duties which he personally attends to.

147-148v

9 July 1829

Busteed

Hay

Thanking Murray for discontinuing his suspension, despite his belief that he has acted neglectfully in his official duties, which belief he expects arises from his not having been informed of the charges preferred against him. Saying that if he returns to Nfld now, without the matter being properly attended to fully, he will lose his character, his £500 debts, his foregoing salary and fees, and the prospect of future fees as well. Asking that Murray would inspect the documents from Nfld, and bring the matter under his consideration to make a decision upon.

149-149v

11 July 1829

Busteed

Hay

Acquiescing to his decision which he considers to be recognizing his integrity in his official conduct. Asking, however, that he granted a different office in any of the other North American Colonies, of no less emolument than his previous one, and that his salary for his suspension be issued and not retained, lest he be ruined financially.

151

 -

A note asking what are the emoluments of the office held by Mr. Fitzgerald, which is answered £600 per annum.

152-152v

18 July 1829

Busteed

Hay

Thanking Hay and Murray for the extension of his leave which has been granted, and also the paying out of half his salary by the agent during his absence from Nfld.

154

25 July 1829

Busteed

Hay

Acquiescing to orders to pay back the surplus fees he has kept over the past three years, whilst making a last oblique attempt to make his case by referring to that document which he feels upholds his right to them.

C

157

12 Jan 1829

Isaac Coffin

Hay

Asking that Murray might have justice done to him, an old sailor. Having frequently made application tot he colonial office, the merits of his case are already in their possession.

159

18 May 1829

Cormack

Murray

Sending his regrets that business prevented him from personally delivering the resolution of the Beothuk Institution which he here encloses.

161

12 Jan 1828

A.W. Des Barres, chairman and vice patron

-

Further Correspondence: the decision of the Institution to lay their proceedings before Murray.

164-169

-

A.W. Des Barres, chairman and vice patron

-

Further Correspondence: the aforementioned proceedings. Printed copy of the research goals of the Institution, and a detailed account of Cormackís expedition to White Bay and north and east coasts with three "Indians" in search of Beothucks. Footnotes contain accounts of previous encounters between Beothuck and Europeans including Shawnadithit and Captain Buchanís expedition.

171

 -

Further Correspondence: a note, annexed to the above, of the natural resources, and Red Indians, of Nfld.

173-173v

26 Dec 1829

W.E. Cormack

Murray

Listing the British ports, in descending order, which have the greatest amount of trade with Nfld.

175

21 May 1829

George Coster, archdeacon of Nfld

Murray

Requesting the payment of 300 pounds of his salary during his leave of absence.

177-178

17 June 1829

Coster

Murray

His memorial regarding the state of the established church in Nfld,, and of the Society for the propagation of the Gospel, and asking that he allow the Governor to extend a greater amount "of favour and protection, to a clap of person so evidently serviceable (no less to this Government than to the Church)."

179

10 Sept 1827

Bishop of Nova Scotia

Cochrane

Further Correspondence: an extract of a letter enclosed with the above memorial regarding the establishment of schools in Newfoundland and requests for government support.

180-180v

1 July 1829

The Archbishop of Canterbury

Murray

Transmitting a memorial from the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts.

182-182v

1 July 1829

ditto

ditto

Transmitting a memorial from the archdeacon of Nfld, with its extract of a letter from the Bishop of nova Scotia, seeking "the means of employing a greater number of Catechists and Schoolmasters for the instruction of the lower classes in religion and morals."

184

8 July 1829

Cormack

Murray

A note concerning his transmission of the circumstances of the death of Shawnawdithit, who, it is feared, was the last of her tribe.

186-187

17 Sept 1829

Cormack

A note concerning his personal delivery of a paper on the Newfoundland Fisheries, and a map of the interior of Nfld (in its unfinished state). Offering his services to cross and explore New Holland (Western Australia) and New South Wales in any direction, or to make a more copious report of North America.

188-188v

Hay

A note regarding information provided by Mr. Cormack.

190-191v

30 Oct 1829

Frederic Hamilton Currington

Murray

Requesting the appointment of an archdeacon of the Island of Nfld, which position will soon be vacant by the removal of Coster to succeed a Mr. Best as Archdeacon in New Brunswick.

Mr. Clarke

193

14 Jan 1829

A. Clarke

Murray

The late colonial secretary and Clerk of HMís council for Nfld informs him of his arrival in town from that colony, and volunteers himself as a source of information regarding the accounts of the Government he had the duty of preparing during his holding of office. Requesting an interview, at his convenience.

195-196

19 Jan 1829

A. Clarke

Hay

Asking Hay if he has brought Clarkeís name under the notice of Sir George Murray for the possibility of a position in the colony.

197-214...[contíd on next reel]

9 March 1829

A. Clarke

Hay

As the affairs of Nfld are about to be brought before the Legislature, particularly regarding the Act of Judicature, Clarke offers his observations based on his experiences as Colonial Secretary and Clerk of HMís Council in the colony. He discusses the state of the colony and gives his opinions on how members of parliament should deal with the colony. He continues on to discuss trade and the fisheries, the general state of society, and the possibility of Newfoundland becoming an agricultural land. The trade is confined to the export of fish and the supply of fishermen with necessities by merchants. Discusses the depreciation of Newfoundland fish and complaints about the treaty of Paris ceding the best fishing grounds to the French. Remarks are made on the emergence of the seal hunt. He continues to describe Newfoundland society as characterised by the relationship between two classes: the merchant and the dealer with the former having absolute control over the latter. He then proceeds to tackle the question of whether Newfoundland could become a great agricultural country. He concludes that, in general, such an idea is impossible due to climate, quality of the soil, etc. Agriculture in Newfoundland can only be supplementary to the fishery he argues. Extensive description of many other economic aspects of the island including the possibility of mining. He then turns to the state of the Church and tells of an incident of a Catholic priest who prayed that the American flag would "fly triumphant over the British" in Newfoundland. Clarke argues that the Protestant religion should be sustained for its doctrine "inculcates fidelity and allegiance to King and Constitution" in contrast to the rebellious Catholic doctrine. He concludes his letter with remarks about Judicature. Note: Letter marked "Private and Confidential."

CO 194/79 [continued on Reel B698]

214-214v

ditto

ditto

ditto

The conclusion of the lengthy letter on previous slide with remarks by Clarke about the judicature.

215-215v

11 March 1829

-

-

Remarks on the above letter stating that Clarkeís views are not at all agreed upon, and many people would, in fact, take offense to them. Instructions to advise Mr. Hay to look at the letter as a few hastily thrown together remarks from Mr. Clarke.

217

6 July 1829

-

-

A letter regarding a request by Mr. Clarke to Sir George Murray to be appointed to the now vacant position of Clerk of the Supreme Court of Newfoundland. He sent the letter to Downing Street after regular office hours but did not receive a reply and would like Mr. Hay to inform him of the situation.

H

220-221v

25 April 1829

Mr. A. Hogsett [Haysett?]

Lieutenant General Sir George Murray

Regarding claims by Hogsett, late deputy sheriff to the colony of Newfoundland, upon His Majestyís Government. Hogsett attaches two memorials detailing these claims. Apparently, after the abolition of the naval office, the High Sheriff of Newfoundland appointed Hogsett deputy sheriff. However, nothing was done by HMís Government to put this situation on "a footing of permanency and respectability" and Hogsett feels the need to address the subject.

222-222v

25 April 1829

A. Hogsett

Lieut. Gen. Sir George Murray

The attached memorial to Lord Bathurst detailing the previous experience of Mr. Hogsett demonstrating his lengthy service with the Royal Navy.

224

25 April 1829

A. Hogsett

Lieut. Gen. Sir George Murray

Another attached memorial detailing other past duties of Mr. Hogsett.

226-227

1 July 1829

A. Hogsett

R.W. Hay

A letter informing Hay that Murray does not have the power to increase Hogsettís salary as deputy sheriff. Now he pleads his case to Hay instead.

228

2 July 1829

A. Hogsett

R.W. Hay

Further correspondence making known a request from a Colonel Adye in the Royal Artillery upon the part of Captain Buchan with which could not be complied and asking for Hayís opinion.

R

231-232

15 July

-

-

A difficult to decipher document regarding a letter being held by a Mr. Robinson for Mr. Hay asking if any decision has been made with regards to Captain Buchanís request.

233-234

-

-

-

Regarding the departure of Captain Buchan from Newfoundland. When he leaves, he will no longer be Sheriff and thus will only be entitled to half-salary.

S

236

27 Jan 1829

Mr. Stuart [?], Harbour Grace, Newfoundland

R.W. Hay

A request that the accompanying letter be forwarded to Chief Justice of Newfoundland, Mr. Tucker, who is currently in England.

Mr. Simms

239-240

10 May 1829

James Simms, London

Sir George Murray

Mr. Simms, Attorney General of Newfoundland, having been away from his native England for seven years, took leave from his duties in the colony for a period of time to visit his homeland. He now wishes to be paid for this leave of absence and refers to previous communications and the decisions of authorities in Newfoundland to support his case.

241-244v

6 June 1829

James Simms

Sir George Murray

An appeal to receive certain fees in excess of his salary which, according to him, every officer of his status is entitled to receive. He argues that as an attorney in Newfoundland, he has many more duties than an attorney in England, or even the other British colonies and is thus entitled to more pay. He was forced to hire a clerk, and supply his office with the necessary stationery out of his own pocket, in addition to supporting his family.

245-246v

29 June, 1829

James Simms

R.W. Hay

An acknowledgement of a letter sent from Hay informing Simms that Sir George Murray has consented to Simmsí request for entitlement to fees resulting in an increase of 250 pounds per annum. He then draws attention back to the issue of the clerk he was forced to hire and pay on his own expense. He implores Murray to advance 150 pounds to pay for this extra expense.

247-247v

8 July 1829

James Simms

R.W. Hay

A further appeal to receive his half-year salary as Attorney General of ^225.

249-249v

10 July 1829

James Simms

R.W. Hay

Having not yet received any payment, Simms continues his appeal to his half-year salary.

251-251v

13 July 1829

James Simms

R.W. Hay

Responding to Hayís letter asking if anyone had been appointed to Simmsí position in his temporary absence. Simms informs him that no one has, but his clerk continues to perform all the "ordinary duties" required.

253-254

16 July 1829

James Simms

R.W. Hay

Once more requesting payment of his salary from January to July. Gives further reasons why he is entitled to this payment and again hopes Sir George Murray will pay him the money.

T

256-257v

15 May 1829

Templeman

R.W. Hay

Acknowledging a letter from Hay concerning Templemanís letter to Lord Bathurst which was forwarded to the colonial office. In the letter to Bathurst he requested a higher salary but his chief purpose of the letter was to appeal for a higher office in the colony. This letter requests the same of Hay, referencing his past service to argue that he deserves a higher office as a reward.

258-259

9 Feb 1829

Templeman

Sir George Murray

A similar letter to the above addressed to Murray instead. Templeman mentions he has gained the good opinion of his superiors for his sixteen years of service, but would like a more substantial reward.

Mr. Tucker

261-261v

27 Feb 1829

R.A. Tucker, Edinburgh

R.W. Hay

Acknowledgment of a letter sent by Hay in September which Tucker had just received on the 26th of February. He thanks both Hay and Murray for their favourable consideration of his claims on behalf of the Governor of Newfoundland and informs Hay that he will pay respects to them personally when he arrives in London shortly.

263-264v

Thursday, 19 March 1829

R.A. Tucker, London

Sir George Murray, Secretary of State for the Colonies

A description of his experiences and principles as a judge in Newfoundland. He tells of great value he attaches to certain societies for the kindness they have bestowed on him and attaches some documents for Murray to read. There are two purposes in attaching the documents: to show his respect for the bodies represented in the documents, and to convey to Murray a knowledge of how his presence is appreciated in the colony.

265-270

-

-

-

The aforementioned attachment. An article from The Newfoundlander dated December 18th, 1828 detailing the departure of Chief Justice Tucker from Newfoundland and the applause he received. In the article a letter from the St. Johnís Chamber of Commerce to Tucker is published. The letter praises and thanks him for his valuable service as Chief Judge. It also publishes Tuckerís reply thanking them for their kind remarks. The pattern of praise and thanks continues with the Benevolent Irish Society and the Mechanics Society.

272-271v

Thursday, 26 March 1829

R.A. Tucker, London

R.W. Hay

A request to leave London to visit his family in Edinburgh next Saturday.

274-275v

13 April 1829

R.A. Tucker

Sir George Murray

Regarding an order that no officer of the Civil Establishment should be paid more than half of his salary while Chief Justice Tucker was absent. Tucker now requests that full salaries be paid.

276-279v

14 April 1829

R.A. Tucker, Edinburgh

Sir George Murray

On certain inconveniences of living in Newfoundland. Tucker writes that it is difficult to find a "comfortable" house for his family, and proper instruction for his children. He remarks that the quality of housing is very poor considering the Newfoundland environment. Inquiring about the possibility of residing in the old government-house when the governorís new house is completed.

280-281

15 April 1829

R.A. Tucker, Edinburgh

Sir George Murray

An appeal on behalf of the Attorney-General of Newfoundland to be entitled to certain fees which are normal for attorney-generals to receive in excess to their salary.

282-282v

1 June 1829

R.A. Tucker, St. Johnís

Sir George Murray

Regarding his return to St. Johnís for the Spring session of the courts. He evidently made a promise to send to Murray certain fees he obtained in the province in return for letting him return to the island on leave of absence.

284

9 October 1829

-

-

Regarding leave of absence payments and arrangements for Mr. Tuckerís family.

W

287-288

21 August

Annie Westcole, Bristol

Sir George Murray

Regarding a payment of ^31 per annum by deVilliers which he recently has not received. He has informed Mrs. Westcole that he will pay her as soon as he can. In this letter, Mrs. Westcole takes the matter to Sir George Murray, explaining that she barely gets by with the ^31, and without it she will be ruined.

289-289v

11 October

Annie Westcole

Sir George Murray

Another request for payment from the government. She informs Murray that she is in very poor health and is afraid of being evicted for not even having a six pence to pay her landlord.

Memorial of Chamber of Commerce for Free Post

293-297

22 April 1829

Mr. H. Brooking, President of the Chamber of Commerce, St. Johnís

Sir George Murray

A memorial from the St. Johnís Chamber of Commerce petitioning for an improvement of trade in Newfoundland which is somewhat lacking in comparison with the neighbouring colonies of Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, and Canada. They indentify the major issue to be the absence of a "free warehousing port." Other topics include: trade with the West Indies; crippling trade duties on rum; trade with "Hamburgh" [Hamburg, Germany] which, evidently, supplied the island with much needed supplies; and remarks on the use of fish in place of cash.

299-299v

Dec 1828

David Buchan, High Sheriff of Newfoundland

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Quoted correspondence regarding a meeting to be held on the 18th of December to make a petition against the imposition of further duties on imports or duties on exports to be sent to parliament for consideration.

(no pages numbers, but, between pages 300v-303v)

1 January 1829

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Sir George Murray

A petition resulting from a meeting consisting of the inhabitants of St. Johnís and the surrounding area. It was resolved "That a petition be prepared and forwarded to the Right Honourable Secretary of State for the Colonies, that his Majestyís government concede to Newfoundland a constitutional legislature Government."

304-315

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An index offering very brief summaries of all the documents in this volume.

End of Volume 79