CO 194/74 [Reel B-695]

Page

Date

From whom(where)

To whom(where)

Contents or nature of the document

Newfoundland 1827 Despatches

Volume 1 January to December Sir Thomas Cochrane & Chief Justice Tucker

3

1 Jan 1827

Cochrane

Bathurst

Transmitting "Dockets of the Despatches" addressed to the Colonial Office last year

5-10

9 Jan 1827

Cochrane

Bathurst

Forwarding a letter from Tucker, regarding the four cases of Armstrong, Lahey, McCabe, and Power, the highwayman, murderer, and two wife killers acquitted on insanity, respectively, recommending Tuckerís suggestions. On the last two cases, he takes the opportunity of pointing out the need for an insane asylum, as no such facility yet exists for care of such needs. Prisoners must therefore be incarcerated in "a very confined prison without the possibility of their receiving that treatment which persons so circumstanced require". Enclosed are three memorials form Armstrong, McCabe, and Power, and an opinion of four doctors as to the latter. These cases plus Tuckerís letter will draw Bathurstís attention to "the state of the law in this Colony" that ensued from the changes introduced in 1825. Cochrane expresses concern about the consequences of the ambiguities and uncertainties in the legal system (e.g.; governorís proclamation no longer have force of law). Cites example of a case where a thief was caught but subsequently released because his arrest was illegal as a result of the legal uncertainties

11-13v

29 Dec 1826

Tucker

Gov. Cochrane

Tucker implores Cochrane to deal with the case of the four prisoners incarcerated since early 1826 for reason of insanity, though innocent of any crime. Recommended that Armstrong & Lahey be transported for life rather than executed

15-17v

11 Jan 1827

James Power

Bathurst

Petition of James Power, who murdered his wife while in a state of mental derangement. Recapitulates the circumstances of the case

19-19v

9 Jan 1827

Carson, M.D., Warner, M.C.I.L. & Surgeon, Shea, M.D., Kelley, Surgeon

Christopher Ayre

medical opinion on Power, based on their examination of him. Also examined James McCabe and conclude that he acted in a "fit of insanity" and, though now "perfectly sane", remains a danger to the public

21-24v

18 Dec 1826

William Armstrong

Bathurst

William Armstrongís petition, charged with highway robbery. Recapitulates the nature and circumstances of his offenses. Has been incarcerated for over two years, not knowing his fate. This is like "the torture of ten thousand deaths". Describes prison conditions. Seeks clemency.

25-28

13 Jan 1827

James McCabe

Bathurst

Petition of James McCabe. Summarizes his case (murdered his wife). Seeks mercy

29-32

13 Jan 1827

Cochrane

Bathurst

Regarding numerous applications for grants of land already taken without due authority into cultivation. He encloses the standard Grant form and statement, and one which he has altered and is submitting for his approval. Remarking how the recent fall-off in the fishery has caused people to turn their attention to agriculture. He also submits a memorial from a Mr. Halbrook, a surveyor, asking for a raise in salary. He also submits a "new Scale of Fees".

33

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-

-

Further Correspondence: A printed form for the granting of land.

34-36v

-

-

-

Further Correspondence: Cochraneís proposed alterations to the above.

38

20 Dec 1826

George Halbrook

Cochrane

Petition of George Halbrook; summarizes his service since his appointment in 1821; the fees he has received each year. Needs better fees, some assistants, better facilities

40

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-

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Further Correspondence: the new Scale of Fees.

41-42v

18 Jan 1826

Cochrane

Bathurst

Transmits a representation from the Attorney General, and also the opinion of the Chief Justice upon it, with which he agrees. Discussing the protectiveness of people to their Ďrightsí; a proto-assertion of a desire for greater autonomy, in which it is demanded that the Governor confer with them before resolving to institute any measure, "however beneficial in itself, that bears the least appearance of legislating for them". The constant need, therefore, to confer with the Attorney General has taken away from his private practice, and thus Cochrane advises giving him a larger salary.

43-47

16 Jan 1827

Attorney General James Simms

Cochrane

Simms sets out his case regarding his fees and salary, and that "from the peculiar constitution of our local Government and its incidents, particular duties of a very responsible nature, and to an almost indefinite extent, devolve upon me, which no such officer in other Colonies is required to exercise, I considered myself most justly entitled to receive an adequate requital for my services in those particulars". The letter then elaborates in detail on this situation

49-51v

16 Jan 1827

Tucker

Cochrane

Tuckerís opinion on Simmsí letter. Regards Simmsí salary of £300/annum "very inadequate". Tucker then expands on the "peculiar" character of Newfoundlandís administrative and legal system, which he claims "contains less of the elements of a Government founded upon the model of the British Constitution than any Country I am acquainted with." This demands much skill and prudence of the Attíy General, to the detriment of his private practice.

53-54v

19 Jan 1827

Cochrane

Bathurst

Responding to proposal for new barracks, and the inspection he had ordered of the existing barracks & hospital, to bring the matter more fully into the consideration of His Majestyís Government. He suggests centralizing the military more around Fort William."Neither Forts Townshend nor William exist now but in name". Why Fort William is better suited for locating the new barracks. Discussion of the extreme deficiencies of the hospital, the risk to the health of the patients

57-71

10 Jan 1827

-

-

"report and estimate" of the barracks proposed to be built in Fort William at a cost of £29390..8..6.; details and annotations of the proposal

73-78v

16 Jan 1827

G.G. Lewis

Lt. Col. Burke, C.O. of the troops

"Report to accompany a Plan and Estimate"; background and summary of the history of the existing structures going back to 1745. Assessment of the existing structures and of the proposed new ones.

81-83v

26 Dec 1826

Hogsett, Lewis (Engineers), & Skinner (Artillery)

Lt. Col. Burke

The letter that accompanies the previous documents, and explains the rationale and findings of their survey

85

31 Dec 1826

I. Strachan, Asst. Surgeon

Lt. Col. Burke

Report on the hospital attached to the barracks which is under his charge ("exposed and bleak situation, slight construction and limited accommodation"); effect that the poor facilities have on the health of the patients

87-87v

31 Dec 1826

T.K. Burke

Cochrane

transmitting letters from those instructed to make reports etc. New barracks are "indispensable to the discipline health and comfort of the Men"

89-89v

16 Jan 1827

Burke

Cochrane

reaffirms that new facilities will "at once do away with a fertile source of indiscipline, drunkenness & discontent (arising from the present scattered and comfortless habitations of the Men)"

91

29 Jan 1827

Cochrane

Bathurst

Transmits a memorial from the Chamber of Commerce regarding the difficulties in the fisheries and trade during the past year.

93-94v

29 Jan 1827

Brooking

Bathurst

the memorial; fishery has been reduced to "an extreme state of depression." Summarize the imports on which duties are collected, even goods that are "fit and necessary" for the fishery. Need to make it easier to import products from the United States. Seek permission to have flour & bread made in Great Britain of foreign grains bonded for importation to Nfld & Labrador. Request other modifications to the existing trade regulations in order to reduce the cost and inconvenience of importing certain goods. Also complain about duties imposed on saltcod imported into Oporto. Summary of specific recommendations.

95-95v

29 Jan 1827

Cochrane

Horton

Proposal to use standardized paper from H.M. Stationery Office for official correspondence

97-101v

29 Jan 1827

Cochrane

Bathurst

Transmits two memorials: one from the inhabitants of Harbour Grace to himself, asking for a better police and military presence to assist the civil authorities, and one from the Chamber of Commerce to Bathurst, asking that the Island not be deprived of a Naval presence. Provides an assessment of the social structure of Nfld, the merits of these memorials, the needs involved, and the state of the military and the settlements in question. In most societies, the "moral influence of the higher Orders is generally sufficient without seeking foreign physical Aid". This is not the case in Nfld, where "the higher Class is composed solely of those whose commercial transactions being them daily in Collision with the lower." Harbour Grace has only 10-12 of the higher order; other outports but 2, 3 or 4. Governor must appoint magistrates who end up hearing "their own cases". Result: lower classes lack respect for the upper. A bad fishing season predictably results in fears for security of private property and demands for forces to protect them. Assessment of Conception Bay, where growth of population and concentration of commerce intensifies these issues. Need to station military forces (one company) or a warship there permanently in winter. Problem is that the troops sent to Nfld "for the most part are worn out and decayed soldiers, totally unfit to perform the duties necessarily imposed on them." Illness means the Nfld garrison is usually much understrength. Cochrane proposes that a militia be raised in the winter to address these needs; cheap; a useful way of employing the unemployed. Cochrane is less supportive of the Chamberís proposal; no warship can patrol from port to port in winter. It makes more sense to keep warships in winter at a central place like St,. Johnís and respond when needed as needed.

103-104

29 Dec 1826

[many names]

Cochrane

The memorial of the "respectable Inhabitants" of Harbour Grace, regarding the consequences that ensue in winter from the lack of a police force and a military force to aid the civil powers

105

25 Jan 1827

Lt. Col. T.K. Burke

-

a report on the state of the Royal Nfld Veteran Companies (numbers, remarks, deployment of guards)

107-107v

31 Jan 1827

Cochrane

Horton

He intends to avail himself of a leave of absence and return to his family in England until next fall.

109-110v

1 Feb 1827

Cochrane

Bathurst

Justifies the extra charges on the deliverance of letters to seamen; dates back to Gov. Erasmus Gowerís day

111-116

6 Feb 1827

Cochrane

Bathurst

Defending his expenditure of £2100 on repairing the roads and bridges in and around St. Johnís. He claims that it served the double purpose of repairing the terrible state of the aforementioned, but more importantly, served as a source of employment for the destitute, which he claims as his primary motive.

117-119

20 March 1826

Brenton

Thos. Brooking, Pres., Chamber of Commerce, St. Johnís

Regarding immigration from Ireland, most of whom subsequently leave Nfld, and most of those who remain cannot support themselves; a social problem. 1825 Fishery Act repealed the terms of the Passenger Act, thus opening the door to this influx; "it is obvious that the Ease and cheapness with which the superabundant population of Ireland may be transported hither, and the facility with which, in the Summer time, they can be supported here, and above all the expectation held out to them of their being provided at the public expense with a passage back to their Country in the Winter, are strong inducements to emigration from Ireland". Causes more people to come than Nfld can support. Burden in the past has fallen on government. Governor wants this to stop; he wonít support people in future

121-124

10 May 1826

Cochrane

Archdeacon Coster

Discussing "a serious consideration of the causes that have occasioned such an unfortunate state of things, and the means that ought to be adopted to prevent their recurrence". In effect, what to do with the anticipated demands on government when winter sets in and the poor turn to government for relief. Wants to avoid repeat of last season. Rations consumed by fishermen are greater than Cochrane ever imagined, "far beyond what the hardest working Man in Scotland can ever Command" and greater than what French fishermen in Nfld consume. Summer wages should be sufficient "if properly husbanded" yet much is dissipated even before fishing season ends. Cochrane regards the example and precepts of the Clergy as an important source for the solution of this situation: "it is to you, Sir, I look for assistance in bringing about si desirable an End as the improvement of the morals & the habits of the lower classes". The clergy must use the pulpit to guide their flock and bring an end to this dependency on government relief

125-125v

28 Feb 1827

Cochrane

Bathurst

Acknowledging receipt of Bathurstís letter (23 Oct 1826) requesting further explanation and information regarding the differing view of the inhabitants on the best state and mode of the police in St. Johnís.

127-128v

28 Feb 1827

Cochrane

Horton

Making a correction to an errant phrase he discovered in a previous letter of his correspondence, so as to convey his actual intended meaning, regarding the state of St. Johnís. He also mentions that there is much less distress and misery this winter. Also asking that an accompanying letter be put into the ambassadorís bag for Paris.

129-130v

1 May 1827

unsigned [Cochrane?](Government House, St. Johnís)

Bathurst

Regarding the death of His Royal Highness the Duke of York and Albany, and the public mourning that took place. Saying that his government was in a difficult position on that note, because unofficial word had reached them before official orders came to allow public mourning, and he had, to save face, to allow said mourning even before the orders had arrived. Asking that better arrangements for such things might in the future be made to avoid such predicaments.

131-137

1 May 1827

Cochrane

Bathurst

Discussing the pros and cons, in his opinion, of the incorporation of St. Johnís.

139-140

2 March 1827 & 16 May 1827

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Reports of the Committee and of a Meeting held on 16 May, regarding the incorporation of St. Johnís.

141

13 June 1826

James Stewart

Brenton

cover letter for memorials transmitted on the above.

143

9 June 1826

James Stewart

E.B. Brenton

extract of a letter regarding the aforementioned memorials.

145-145v

8 June 1827

Cochrane

Bathurst

Asking that he send someone to fill the role of Assistant judge of the Supreme Court, as there is no one in Nfld competent and qualified for the position.

147-148

9 June 1827

Cochrane

Bathurst

Transmitting the Blue Book for 1825, complete but for the value of imports & exports. He would have sent the Blue Book for 1826 with it, but he is still waiting for returns from the outports. He suggests that in future, all those returns heretofore made by the Naval Officer, should be rendered by the Custom House, and Deputy Collectors.

149-149v

8 Aug 1827

Cochrane

Viscount Goderich

Acknowledging news that Goderich has received the "Seals of the Colonial Department", and that he shall direct his future correspondence to him.

151-156v

25 Sep 1827

Cochrane

Viscount Goderich

Regarding the landing, in May, of the Freedom from Waterford, Ireland, with diseased people on board, several of whom died en route. Other vessels have arrived since with sick on board, destined for St. Johnís or for Quebec or Halifax. The rate at which the sickness is spreading among the lower orders is alarming, he says, but thankfully only 81 have thus far died. He says that the treatment of the people aboard two vessels, including the Freedom, were worse than had been reported on most slave ships from Africa (Cochrane bases this on his own experience in intercepting a French slaver years before in the West Indies). The second vessel is the Brig James, also from Waterford, bound for Halifax; 164 passengers, of which 41 + r crew are ill with typhus fever, and which put into St. Johnís for want of provisions. Reports that the vessel is over-crowded. Comments on current practice of making passengers bring their own provisions. People are completely ignorant of what theyíll need for the trans-Atlantic voyage. Even if they brought sufficient provisions with them, they wouldn;t know how to economize in their consumption of those provisions. Another vessel, the Maria, came in with the passengers in a state of mutiny, several in irons, and the master armed for self-protection. Blames repeal of Passenger Act in 1825, as well as "those persons who make a trade of importing Paupers". Draws Goderichís attention to proclamations posted in Ireland "totally falsifying the real state of the Vessel intended to transport those willing to emigrate" [margin annotation: "Is not this punishable?"]. Describes victualling arrangements; masters will cram their vessels, ignoring any diseases brought on board. Particularly distressed that servants for the fishery were exempt from the Passenger Act recently repealed; urges that this clause not be reinstated if a new Act is introduced. In fact, masters of vessels are not really transporting servants, they only say this to use this loop-hole in the act. Recommends that medical men be consulted to establish proper ration of number of passengers to size of vessel and provisions needed, and that standards be adopted for cleanliness

159-160

17 May 1827

John Moore, Lawyer of Navigation

W. A. Clarke, Secretary

Detailed report of the state of and conditions on the Freedom.

161-163

18 May 1827

Moore

Clarke

legal appraisal of the condition of the Freedom. Various ways in which the vessel circumvented or violated existing regulations

165-165v

26 Sep 1827

Cochrane

Goderich

The importation of disease from Ireland has brought to his attention Ė which he now brings to the Viscountís attention Ė that "there are no Quarantine laws in operation in this Island, nor Harbour Master, Health officer, or Pratique [?] Master attached to the Port," nor any power to prevent contact between passengers and people ashore, "however pestilential the disease may be that accompanies them". In the case of the diseased vessels recently arrived, the magistrates acted without strict authority, and only after the seriousness of the situation was identified, by which time many passengers had disembarked.

167-172v

26 Sep 1827

Cochrane

Goderich

Regarding the exclusive treaty rights to fishing, claimed by France, to the prejudice of British subjects and American fishermen who also have treaty entitlements. Last discussed in 1824 by Foreign Office and therefore possibly not in the files of the Colonial Office. Therefore, he passes copies of correspondence from that period to him. Acts of aggression against American fishermen by the French "exercising ... sovereignty upon these shores" persist. Less friction of late with British fishermen, who simply avoid coasts where the French fish. Proceeds to comment on the particulars of French claims of exclusivity. Cites various treaties since Utrecht (1713) including Franco-American Convention (1778), the Treaty of 1783, Peace of Amiens (1802), proclamations by past governors of Nfld, etc. Concludes that according to Utrecht, "British subjects enjoyed that privelege [sic] in common with those of France". After 1815, British subjects seemed to concede the French position, though Cochrane cannot understand why or on what basis

175-178v

19 Jun 1764

Hugh Palliser, C in C over Nfld.

-

Palliserís proclamation, giving instructions on how to regulate French fishing rights "in common with the Kingís Subjects"

180-181v

27 July 1765

Hugh Palliser

(Croque)

-

Palliserís proclamation to English & French fishing admirals, letting them know of his presence there and his position on French fishing rights

183-185

24 June 1772

Edward Bragge for Gov. Shuldham

Capt. Hawker HMS Alborough

Instructions following French complaints of obstructions to their fishery on the treaty shore, where they fish "in common" with British fishermen

187-188

12 July 1775

Robert Duff

-

a proclamation by the Governor concerning recent disputes between French & British fishermen at Bonavista Harbour. Affirms French right to what he describes as a "concurrent fishery"

189-190

27 July 1773

Shuldham

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a proclamation concerning interference with French fishermen at Bonavista by British fishermen; reference to right by fishermen of both nations to fish on treaty coast

191-193v

10 Sep 1784

John Campbell

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a proclamation by Gov. Campbell affirms the shift of the treaty shore limits west, now from Cape St. John to Cape Ray. Fixed British settlements on that coast must be removed, but people may still fish there

195-197v

26 July 1788

J. Elliott

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a proclamation by Gov. Elliott regarding treatment of French fishermen on the treaty coast

199-201v

8 June 1802

James Gambier

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a proclamation on the same question

203-206

8 April 1824

Hamilton

Stafford Canning

Hamilton has been asked to comment on the question of people resorting to Bay St. George in western Nfld for the herring fishery. Insists that treaty language forbidding interference with French fishermen in the exercise of their rights does not strip British fishermen of their right to fish ("the Cod fishery on the Coast remained as much a right of both parties as that on the Great Bank"). Some French officers maintain that French fishing rights are exclusive ones, and so they denied Mr. Bird the right to maintain his salmon fishery in Bonne Bay in 1822, which he had exercised since 1814. Bird complained to Hamilton, and Hamilton therefore sent a patrol last year to Bonne Bay, where Bird had returned. Hamilton felt that Bird was guilty of interference of the French fishery by competition and exclusion because the salmon fishery, unlike the cod fishery, must be operated as a monopoly. French government had been tolerant of those who settled in the region during the war. British cod fishermen donít usually fish where the French fish for cod, excepting Bay St. George where they are drawn by the herring for bait. Points out that the French of St. Pierre "enjoy an indulgence from His Majesty which they would not willingly lose, I allude to the cutting wood in the Bay of Fortune and Despair"; Hamilton has received many complaints of abuse of this "indulgence" which had been granted for only one year in order to reconstruct their houses [in St. Pierre]

207-212v

March 1824

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a commentary on the various treaties that relate to French fishing rights and privileges, and to American fishing privileges up to the early 1820s

213-213v

22 Jan 1823

Albert Gallatin(Paris)

Viscount Chateaubriand

Concerning American fishing vessels ordered off the West Coast of Nfld in 1820 & 1821 by armed French vessels, even though the Convention of 1818 between the USA & Great Britain established their right to be there

215-217v

28 Feb 1823

Chateaubriand

Gallatin

a reply to the last entry, in French. Chateaubriand makes reference to French fishing rights which he defines as "exclusive" as a result of the Treaty of Utrecht, and also refers to an agreement of 1800 between France and the United States to avoid encroaching on each otherís fishing domains. Chateaubriand endeavours to clarify the situation created by the intersection of separate international fishing agreements

219-226v

14 March 1823

Gallatin (Paris)

Chateaubriand

reply to Chateaubriandís of 28 Feb; Americans do not exercise right to dry & cure fish, only claim right to take fish, though not to the exclusion of the French who have the same right. American position: the right to take fish is not an exclusive one. Chateaubriand has appealed to French-American agreements that are no longer in force. By the agreements of 1778 and 1800, the USA agrees not to interfere with French bank fishery and recognize "indefinite and exclusive [French] right on the Treaty Coast defined by Anglo-French agreements of 1713 and 1783. But the obligations of 1778 do not apply or govern situation on Nfld West Coast today

227-228v

5 April 1823

Chateaubriand

Gallatin

[in French] response to Gallatinís despatch of 14 March

229-229v

2 April 1823

Gallatin (Paris)

Chateaubriand

Reminder that new fishing season is fast approaching and the issue over rights has not been settled. Defines French actions of driving Americans from a coast over which they have no sovereignty as an "aggression"

231-232v

15 April 1823

Gallatin (Paris)

Chateaubriand

Response to Chateaubriandís of 5 April; reaffirms that no restrictions apply to the Americans from Cape Ray to Point Riche [the pre-1783 limit of the Treaty Shore; the US concedes that they are governed by the 1713-83 boundary limits because they were part of the English empire in 1713, but that by 1783 they were not]. He is not certain where Point Riche is because he cannot find it on any maps published before 1713

233

26 Sep 1827

Cochrane

Goderich

Regarding Bathurstís encouragement to organize a small militia "for the purpose of securing the peace of this community, when circumstances may tend to its disturbances"; because the interior is largely uninhabited and land communication and travel virtually impossible, a larger military force is necessary in Nfld. Cochrane goes into details, comparing Nfld with other colonies where the population is more concentrated. Describing his plan for the way such a force would be organized, commanded, deployed, billeted,

237

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A schedule for the establishment of a small militia in Nfld, numbering off the men that each community would be expected to contribute

239-240

26 Sep 1827

Cochrane

Goderich

When the builders for the new Government House arrived from Scotland, the Commissary General would not pay for their support until instructions arrived, and claimed furthermore to be not under the Governorís control, but answerable to the Treasury. He supported them from his own pocket therefore. He says that great calamity might come about, if a superior power were not in place to look after such things, rather than have to wait for commands from across the Atlantic.

241-243

26 Sep 1827

Cochrane

Goderich

Regarding the Church Establishment of the Island; Bishop recently visited from Nova Scotia & spent three months here, subsequently submitting a communication on Church organization in Nfld. Cochrane offers his assessment of the various ideas in the Bishopís proposals

245-246

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Various responses to specific proposals in the Bishopís letter

247-255v

11 Sep 1827

Bishop of Nova Scotia (Halifax)

Cochrane

lengthy letter regarding the Bishopís visit to the island and inspection of the establishment, and thanking the Governor for his facilitation of said visit. Remarking on the deficiency of the establishment in large areas of the Island. Need for more govít support; proposing that clergy become part of civil establishment; proposal that clergy accompany judges on circuit; that parishes be organized; to appropriate glebes; on the subject of the Marriage Act; on schools;

257

9 Oct 1827

Cochrane

Goderich

Transmitting the Blue Book for 1826. Delay caused by difficulty of collecting information from the outports

259

9 Oct 1827

Cochrane

Goderich

Transmitting the Tables required by Bathurstís letter of the 11 Sep 1826, which would have been sent in Jan, except for the delays in receiving information from the Outports.

261-261v

9 Oct 1827

Cochrane

Goderich

Sending two estimates for Stables and the Out offices (mentioned in margin) to be attached to the New Government House. One estimate is for building in stone, the other in wood. He recommends stone, as while it is considerably more expensive, it will not need replacing "for centuries".

263-265

19 Sep 1827

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Further Correspondence: "the estimate for Stables, Coach Houses, and other out Buildings intended to be built at St. Johns Newfoundland for the New Government House." Amounting to £2154"9"9.

267-269

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-

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ditto, amounting to £1467"18"4.

271

9 Oct 1827

Cochrane

Goderich

Asking for a continuation of a publication to be sent to the Attorney General of "Tomlinsí and Raithbysí Quarto Edition of the Statutes at Large from the 54 Geo III to the Present period" for the use of the Attorney General

273

9 Oct 1827

Cochrane

Goderich

Transmitting several memorials: from the Chamber of Commerce, four from some people from the outports, from the Clerks of the Circuit Courts.

275-275v

9 Oct 1827

Hoyles (Pres., Chamber of Commerce, St. Johnís)

Goderich

the memorial of the Chamber of Commerce, regarding the imposition of a new duty, which with all other considerations (such as "the most valuable parts of their Fisheries [being] ceded to their Rivals, the French and Americans"), can not be borne by the Islandís trade and fisheries.

277-277v

29 Sep 1827

[a number of names]

the Commons of the UK

the memorial of the outport people of Kingscove, Bonavista Bay. Regarding the duty intended to be imposed "upon all the Imports into this Island".

279

28 Sep 1827

[a number of names]

Goderich

similar memorial from the people of Aquafort.

281

6 Oct 1827

[many names]

Goderich

similar memorial from the people of Port de Grave.

282

1 Oct 1827

[many names]

Goderich

similar memorial from the people of Harbour Grace.

283-283v

1 Aug 1827

James Blaikie, John Stark, B.G. Garrett

Goderich

memorial of the Clerks of the Circuit Court, asking that they be furnished with their commissions in conformity with the Royal Charter.

285-286

9 Oct 1827

Cochrane

Goderich

Transmitting his general account current with the treasury for the present year; draws attention to the costly burden of dealing with the many people who are in want and distress, and of Cochraneís policy of insisting on labour being provided in exchange for relief and assistance. Notes the impact of immigrants bringing disease

288-292

     

Further Correspondence: the aforementioned account, amounting to £8446"15"5 1/4. Note how each expense is itemized and explained

293-293v

9 Oct 1827

Cochrane

Goderich

Transmitting the geographical and Topographical report for the island for the half year ending 30 July last, stating that "the total want of internal communication necessarily renders a report of this nature very imperfect and inadequate".

295-296

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-

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the aforementioned "Geographical and Topographical Report". Reference to Cormackís journey of 1823 as the only exploration thus far of the interior; division of Nfld into districts; poor roads; course of rivers in interior is "Unknown"; latitudes & longitudes of towns; height of mountains;

297-297v

9 Oct 1827

Cochrane

Goderich

Regarding plans and estimates for a new jail.

299-300

   

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a memo enclosed by Cochrane regarding the jail, with specifications (number of rooms for debtors, felons, working, tread mill, solitary confinement, lunatics, quiet male lunatics, quiet female lunatics, exercise room, chapel, infirmaries, gaolers apartments, other details

301

9 Oct 1827

Cochrane

Goderich

Transmitting a memorial from the High Sheriff, with an extract from a letter he received from the Judges of the Supreme Court related to it.

303-304

7 May 1827

D. Buchan

Bathurst

the abovementioned memorial, asking for a raise in salary.

305

7 May 1827

D. Buchan

-

Further Correspondence: a breakdown of his current earnings, amounting to £1380"5"9.

307

30 April 1827

Supreme Court Judges of Nfld

Cochrane

extract of a letter discussing Buchanís financial position, as regards his request, giving support to his claims.

311-312v

31 March 1827

D. Buchan

Judges of the Supreme Court

extract of a letter regarding the returns of his emoluments and discussing their deficiency.

313-313v

9 Oct 1827

Cochrane

Goderich

Recommending that Oliver St. John, an elderly former Surrogate judge for the District of Conception Bay, whose position was abolished by the Charter, might be granted a pension, as he has a family to support and no other means of income.

315-316

18 Jan 1826

Oliver St. John(Harbour Grace)

Bathurst

the memorial summarizing his service and his need

317

9 Oct 1827

Cochrane

Goderich

Transmitting the report from the Royal Engineer on the present state of the Fortifications of St. Johnís

319-322

9 Oct 1827

Lt.Col. [Jennings?]

Cochrane

the report on the fortifications.

323-323v

no date

Cochrane

Huskisson

Making an appointment upon his return to England for an interview.

325-325v

4 Dec 1827

Cochrane

W. Huskisson

Asks that the present Judicature Act (which will expire in summer, 1829) be extend another year, or until another one can be approved to replace it. Includes suggestions for changes

327-328

5 Dec 1827

Cochrane

Huskisson

Submits an estimate of the expense of establishing a "small effective militia" for service in Nfld. Idea inspired by the decision to remove the warship that protected Conception Bay during the winter. Militia would be an alternative to the other options (restore the warship or increase the military). Defends the merits of this proposal

329-329v

-

-

-

the aforementioned estimate, amounting to £290 for the first two years. Offers employment to people who might otherwise become a burden

331-332

12 Dec 1827

Cochrane

Edward Stanley

On the state of the Government House. Deficiencies of the house in a harsh climate, inadequate even for the servants

333

8 Nov 1827

William Blaikie

Cochrane

saying that the Governor will not be able to live in the old house without some very important repairs to it.

334-334v

22 Dec 1827

Cochrane

Edward Stanley

Regarding the new Passenger Act to replace the defective one which was repealed. Some reasons why the old measure was "defective, if not rendered nugatory"

Chief Justice Tucker

338-345

15 Oct 1827

Tucker

Goderich

Reporting that Cochrane sailed aboard the Treasury vessel Forte for England on the 12th, and that he has assumed administration of the Island in his absence. He also discusses an issue that has arisen in his eligibility to take said position, in conjunction with his position of Chief Justice, according to the Charter. The problem could be resolved if he declines salary for one of the positions. The implications to civil liberties of uniting judicial and civil functions in one person. Discussion of civil government of Nfld. Other concerns.

346-346v

6 Nov 1827

Tucker

William Huskisson

Acknowledging receipt of a letter on 30 October past, noting that His Majesty has honoured Huskisson with the Seals of the Colonial Department in place of Goderich. Assurances of Tuckerís intentions to do a good job in his temporary role as governor

348-348v

8 Nov 1827

Tucker

Huskisson

Regarding His Majestyís Order in Council regulating Commercial intercourse with foreign Countries, which he Proclaimed in their Gazette, asking the Islanders to pay it the strictest obedience.

350

10 Nov 1827

Tucker

Huskisson

Transmitting the minutes of the proceedings of the Board of Privy Council for the Island for the six months ending 20 October

352

10 Nov 1827

Tucker

Huskisson

Transmitting the General Return of the Fishery and Inhabitants of the Island for the year ending 30 June last, together with the Return of the Imports and Exports for the same period.

354

-

-

-

Return of the Seal Fishery 1827

354

-

-

-

Account of the Salmon & Herring Fisheries 1827

355

-

-

-

Return of the Fishery and Inhabitants for the year ending 30 June 1827. (Note: a printed form filled out by hand). St. Johnís north as far as Fogo and south as far as Fortune

356

-

-

-

Account of the Goods Exported from Nfld for the year ending 30 June 1827. (St. Johnís north to Fogo, south to Fortune)

356(v?)

-

-

-

Account of the Goods Imported for the year 30 June 1827.

357-358v

15 Nov 1827

Tucker

Huskisson

Concerning the acceptance of a Mr. Cochrane, a barrister from Nova Scotia, of the office of acting Assistant Judge in the Supreme Court.

359

16 Nov 1827

Tucker

Huskisson

He has permitted Mr. Dickson, Sheriff of Labrador, to take five months leave to proceed to Halifax for the purpose of being admitted as a barrister in the Supreme Court of Nova Scotia.

361-362

27 Nov 1827

Tucker

Huskisson

Acknowledging receipt of a letter containing certain documents, but suggesting that he should better direct his queries to Cochrane, who should be in England by now

363-364

1 Dec 1827

Tucker

Huskisson

Transmitting, as requested by Goderich, a Debtor and Creditor account of the whole Revenue and Expenditure of the Island for the years 1823, 1925, and 1826. Hamilton supposedly prepared the 1824 account, and thus, not having the information to send for 1824, sends instead 1823's information, presuming that the two are bound to be much similar.

Index

367-372v

     

An Index to Cochraneís correspondence.

373-374

     

An Index to Tuckerís correspondence.

End of Volume