CO 194/72 [Reel B-693]

Page

Date

From whom(where)

To whom(where)

Contents or nature of the document

1826 Despatches

Nfld 1826 Vol. 1 Sir Thomas Cochrane

3-3v

1 Jan 1826

Cochrane

Bathurst

Listing, as requested, his dispatches, and copies of the dockets, that he has addressed to Bathurst since (and also before) his assumption of his commission.

4-5

-

-

-

Summary of the despatches and dockets sent to the Colonial Office since his arrival the previous year

7-7v

5 Jan 1826

Cochrane

Bathurst

Transmitting a report from Judge Molloy on the enquiry "respecting the conduct of Mr. Robert Carter, Leutenant [sic] in the Royal Navy, in his capacity of Surrogate in the District of Ferryland"

9-17

3 Jan 1826

Molloy

Cochrane

the aforementioned report on the investigation into Henry Holdsworthís complaint against Robert Carter, concluding that if Carterís surrogacy had not already been ended by the Charter, that he would have had to have been found unfit for the position. He then explains his reasons, based on his analysis of several actions taken by Carter in the case against James Miller, Holdsworthís agent

18-20v

10 Jan 1826

Cochrane

Horton

Regarding the state of the current Govt house, and the plan to build a new one. Encloses a report on the current house prepared by the Ordnance officers in St. Johnís. Reference to high cost of labour, lack of qualified builders, in Nfld and its effect on the estimate (provides examples of the cost of building other structures. Advantage of doing preparatory work in the winter

22-24

26 Oct 1825

John Terrington (Ordnance Storekeeper), Lt.Col. G.G. Lewis, C.O. of Royal Engineers, & Maj. W.T. Skinner, C.O. Royal Artillery

-

the aforementioned report on the state of the current Govt house (description of the current house, its age, work done over the years, conditions, location within abandoned remains of Fort Townshend, .

25-26

26 Oct 1825

Terrington, Lewis, Skinner

E.B. Brenton

responding in compliance with Cochraneís request to examine the govt house and assess repairs needed to make it habitable for the winter.

27

5 May 1823

Hamilton

Horton

(Extract) part of a letter describing the "unfit state of the Govt House".

28

10 Jan 1826

Cochrane

Horton

Hortonís private letter has been forwarded to Mr. Charles Drury in New Brunswick.

30-31

11 Jan 1826

Cochrane

Bathurst

Regarding an application by C.F. Bennett concerning an old memorial sent to Hamilton in 1823 on compensation to former Ďownersí (by right of 60 years occupation rather than by law) for the Govtís resumption in 1806 of a piece of land; Cochrane recommends paying the compensation

32-35

15 Sept 1823

C.F. Bennett, Attorney for Joseph & William Young of Bristol

Hamilton

the aforementioned memorial. Claims goes back to a lease of land in 1770 by Sarah Weston to John Livingston (the Youngs are heirs).Col. Pringle took some of the land in 1776, more in 1789 and in 1790. Details. Reference to the various hands through which the land passed over time. Finally, in 1804 partwas taken for Gower Street and in 1806 a portion was taken on which to build a Parsonage House. Rights of legal heirs (in England) were not properly protected

36-39v

11 Nov 1823

Hamilton

Bennett

Hamiltonís reply to the aforementioned memorial, also enclosed by Cochrane. Denying any legal right to the land, and thus to compensation (no legal title or grant can be confirmed).

40-40v

16 Aug 1806

J. Williams, H. Phillips, S. Knight

-

Extract from the Government Records; an official assessment of value of the land in question.

42

11 Jan 1826

Cochrane

Horton

Acknowledging the reply to his request that the colonial vessel attached to Nfld be allowed to carry a pendant.

44-44v

12 Jan 1826

Cochrane

Bathurst

Regarding the passage back to England of the wife (Johanna Bird) and "four infant Children" of Richard Bird, a marine who served in Egeria in 1824, which he suggests be paid for by stopping the Marineís pay.

46-47

12 Jan 1826

Cochrane

Bathurst

Would like to improve the inadequate postal service between St. Johnís & Halifax; suggests that Bathurst send urgent letters for Cochrane by way of Messrs Hart & Robinson, "whose constant Communication with this place will enable them to forward them to me with certainty and dispatch". Colony needs a regular post office. Suggestions on how to organize a postal service; costs. Mr. Solomon, the present postmaster, operates under an appointment given by Gov. Erasmus Gower in 1806; no real legal standing or formal arrangement with postal service in England

48-48v

14 Jan 1826

Cochrane

Bathurst

Transmits a letter from the Chief Justice regarding 4 capital cases that arose in 1825; the murderer and the highwayman (James Lahey and William Armstrong) and the two wife-killers (James Power and James McCabe)

49-49v

3 Jan 1826

Tucker

Cochrane

Armstrong & Lahey have been in jail for over a year awaiting disposition of their cases; desires direction on how to proceed next in these cases as well as in the cases of Power & McCabe

52-53

14 Jan 1826

Cochrane

Bathurst

Regarding the new appointments made under the new Charter of Justice; appointments made as indicated in the margin.

54-56v

31 Dec 1825

Tucker

Cochrane

Concerning the appointments that are to be made, the protocols to be observed, the salaries to be paid; with memorials on such.

58-60v

11 Jan 1824

James Blaikie

Bathurst

the memorial of James Blaikie; summarizes his extensive and diverse public service over te years and his hope for confirmation in his appointment as Clerk of the Central District Court

61-61v

12 Jan 1826

Tucker

-

commentary on Blaikieís memorial.

62-63

14 Jan 1826

John Stark

Bathurst

Acting Clerk of the Northern Circuit Court; seeks confirmation of his appointment to this office under the new Charter.

64-64v

2 Jan 1826

Thomas Cochrane

John Stark

the appointment of John Stark by the Governor as Acting Clerk of the Northern Circuit Court.

65

 

Molloy, DesBarres, Tucker

Bathurst

recommending confirmation of Starkís appointment

66-66v

16 Jan 1826

Benjamin Greer Garrett

(and Tucker, DesBarres, Molloy, and Paterson)

Bathurst

the memorial of B.G. Garrett for confirmation of his appointment as Acting Clerk of the Southern Circuit Court under the new Charter, accompanied in the postscript by solicitations for approval of that confirmation by the undersigned.

69-72

4 Jan 1826

Tucker, DesBarres, Molloy

Cochrane

Regarding the implementation of the changes to the Judicature, and suggesting they been installed gradually, as people are much accustomed to the old ways of fast and cheap Summary trials rather than slow and expensive Jury trials. Transmitting some general rules and orders of the Supreme Court that they devised and published for that purpose; rationale provided for these procedures.

73-77v

2 Jan 1826

Tucker, Molloy, DesBarres

-

Printed copy of the aforementioned "General Rules and Orders of the Supreme Court"

78

14 Jan 1826

Cochrane

Bathurst

Complying with Bathurstís request (5 Oct 1825) for a return of all civil and other officers in his government who had until then been accommodated with houses or lodgings at public expense.

79

12 Jan 1826

P. OíConnor, Barrack Master (St. Johnís)

-

The aforementioned return.

81-81v

21 Jan 1826

Cochrane

Bathurst

Transmitting a memorial from the Chamber of Commerce at St. Johnís, and recommending it favourably as "the most effectual mean of relieving the trade and fisheries of this island from their present depressed state".

82-83

20 Jan 1826

Thomas W. Brooking, President, Chamber of Commerce

Bathurst

the aforementioned memorial; pleased by measures to permit importation of salted provision from foreign countries, but alarmed that those engaged in the Irish provisions trade have been trying to restore their monopoly in that trade, even though in the past they were unable to satisfy the demand in Nfld

85-85v

22 Jan 1826

Cochrane

Bathurst

Submits Return of the Fisheries and Island of Newfoundland for 1823 (not included here).

87-98

30 Jan 1826

Cochrane

Bathurst

Refers to Cochraneís previous letter (9 Dec 1825) on "the distress existing in many parts of this government". He now offers an analysis of the several causes contributing to that situation, an analysis of how the fishery is prosecuted, and the principles on which the trade is based: two modes of fishing (wage-based and share-based); where practised; role of merchant (supplies on credit against that yearís production in the fall; inability to cover debts; servants spoiled with overly generous rations; "a taste for extravagance disproportionate to their station"; market conditions in Spain (civil war) which led to restrictions on the trade; spiralling depression, while planter remains indebted to merchant, the merchant keeps offering advances in hopes of better years; poor catches this year; mounting poverty and expectations of charity; no employment in winter except cutting wood for personal use or to supply the town; need to encourage agriculture (emphasizes high quality of vegetables grown in Nfld), particularly to the western side of the Avalon; need for improved communication between communities (no roads; Indian tracks at best) so that distress in one district cannot be alleviated by surpluses from another; describes the terrible road to Topsail. Includes a map showing where roads are needed (St. Maryís & Placentia relatively ice-free and therefore have access to Nova Scotia and PEI; road link would permit imports to St. Johnís by way of such bays). Estimated cost of road construction. Also encourages restrictions on immigration from Ireland, to control population growth

99-99v

30 Jan 1826

-

-

a synopsis of Cochraneís analysis of Nfldís need for agricultural development, roads, and restrictions on immigration

101

(recíd 22 May 1826)

-

-

A chart of "the province of Avalon on the South East Coast of Newfoundland" showing where the roads proposed by Cochrane would be built.

102-105

3 April 1826

Cochrane

Bathurst

Concerning payment of a debt in England, in which his promise to repay in January was nearly reneged due to Hamiltonís claim to part of his pay, which was withdrawn from his banker to whom he had instructed his first salary to be paid to relieve that debt.

106-108

29 April 1826

Cochrane

Bathurst

Regarding claims for relief during the winter, and factors that affected their numbers during the previous year; "there was every reason to suppose that by the middle of December Snow would set in so as to enable the lower orders to gain their livelihood by cutting and drawing Wood." But less snow this winter meant more applicants for relief. Too few people of means to contribute enough charity; besides, many had already donated "a large subscription ... in behalf of the Sufferers at Merimachi"; transmits a letter describing conditions in Bonavista. Defends large amounts expended. Reaffirms urgency of the recommendations he made in his despatch of 30 January (above)

110

-

-

-

"Statement of the employment of the Laboring Poor at St. Johnís 1825 1826", with the total sum expended by govt of £2100.

112-113

26 April 1826

Coster (Bonavista)

Brenton

Extract of a letter describing "how we fared in this miserable Harbour" this winter; suggests that 400 people would have died had it not been for the relief supplies sent by Cochrane in response to Costerís previous reports of the seriousness of the situation there

114-114

29 April 1826

Cochrane

Bathurst

Asking that, in light of the usefulness of Major Skinner, the commanding officer at St. Johnís of the detachment of the Royal Artillery (his knowledge, his role in supervising the works in St. Johnís "for the employment of the Poor"), and of Skinnerís willingness to remain in Nfld to continue his useful service to the Governor, Cochrane asks Bathurst to apply to the Duke of Wellington about his staying, while his detachment returns to England.

116

1 May 1826

Cochrane

Bathurst

Transmitting the printed "General Rules and Orders" published by the Chief Justice and Judges of the Supreme Court. (See 69-77).

118-122v

-

-

-

Another printed copy of the abovementioned documents.

123-123v

15 May 1826

Cochrane

Bathurst

Indicating the amount of compensation calculated for the Naval Officer, coming to £174..10..9.5.

124

-

-

-

The return used to calculate the compensation to the Naval Officer.

Continued on Next Film [B-694]

127

15 May 1826

Cochrane

Bathurst

Transmitting an account of all fees levied on the shipping and trade of the colony with the exception of customs revenue.

128

     

The aforementioned account.

130

24 May 1826

Cochrane

Bathurst

Acknowledging receipt of "Circulars" regarding the Custom House Establishment, and the Military authority of Civil Governors.

132

24 May 1826

Cochrane

Bathurst

Transmitting "Minutes of the Proceedings of the "Board of the Privy Council for this Island" (i.e, the Governorís Council) for the last six months

134-135

-

-

-

An index to the minutes, categorized alphabetically, with page numbers per entry.

136-149

-

-

-

The aforementioned minutes. These cover a wide range of concerns and issues that were brought before the Council: legal and judicial administration; authorizing a reward to catch a murderer in Fermeuse; request to allow an American vessel into port with a cargo; questions concerning enforcement of British trade regulations; etc.

150-155

26 May 1826

Cochrane

Bathurst

Regarding the need for a public hospital to be supported by government; how to fund it; the costs charged by the Surgeon; the inevitability here of people who cannot afford to pay for their own medical treatment

156-156v

26 May 1826

-

-

A note describing the origins of the government hospital in 1811, and how it became necessary to fund it out of government revenues

158-163v

27 May 1826

Cochrane

Bathurst

On the terrible condition of roads in St. Johnís, and the "necessity of some regulations for enforcing cleanliness by the removal of nuisances, for guarding against accidents by Fire, and for a more effectual Police establishment". Steps taken by Cochrane since his arrival. Public meetings and proposals on the question

164-165

27 May 1826

-

-

A note summarizing Cochraneís letter, and its enclosures, with some comment on them. Enclosures follow.

167

2 March 1826

-

-

Printed copy of resolutions passed and unanimously agreed to by a general meeting and a committee of 30 appointed to report.

169

3 Apr 1826

-

-

Eleven of the Committee withdraw their names; explanation provided

171-172

-

-

-

Report containing the resolutions which are recommend by Cochrane to Bathurst for consideration; concerning proposal to incorporate St. Johnís, provide a local town council, and therefrom to provide a police. Proposals on who would be able to vote, basic structure of proposed town government, proposed limits of the town, tax structure

173-173v

-

-

-

Memorial presenting this report to the Governor; rationale behind it

175-175v

-

-

-

Printed copy of the resolutions contained in report n.3 canvassed and a counter report proposed, all regarding the idea of incorporating town government in St. Johnís.

177

25 May 1826

-

Gov. Cochrane

Memorial of Inhabitants against the resolutions contained in report n.3. (A large document requiring several frames of microfilm)

178

23 Feb 1826

Merchants & inhabitants of St. Johnís

Gov. Cochrane

Memorial Against Charter of Incorporation.

179-179v

28 Feb 1826

-

-

"An explanatory list of the Subscribers to the [previous] memorial. Containing names, designation (station/job title), and residences. Coming to 172 persons.

180-183

20 June 1826

Cochrane

Horton

Regarding uncultivated lands in Nfld.; discussion of the quality of the soil, climate, etc. for agricultural purposes; most suitable crops. Hi splans to visit the interior to see first hand

184-187

23 June 1826

Cochrane

Bathurst

Regarding his family in England, to which he would like to return at the end of the season, with his permission. Assurances that relations between him and the locals are very good, notwithstanding the strong differences that exist among them

188-189

26 June 1826

Cochrane

Bathurst

Regarding the Commission for the Judge of the Labrador District, and the question raised by the Attorney General as to its validity, and on the opinions given by the Chief Justice and Judge DesBarres of the Supreme Court. (Letters enclosed from each of the aforementioned).

190-191

9 June 1826

James Simms, Attorney General

Brenton

the letter of the Attorney General; concern that there may be questions about the legal basis for exercise of civil jurisdiction on Labrador coast, based on a mis-interpretation of key statutes

192-195v

22 June 1826

R.A. Tucker, Chief Justice

Brenton

Tuckerís opinion, including the opinion of Judge Des Barres of the Supreme Court. He agrees that there is an error in the statute, but concludes that this does not materially affect the administration of the law on the coast of Labrador. Discussion of the way in which jurisdiction over the Labrador coast was recently re-annexed to Nfld

197-199

27 June 1826

Cochrane

Bathurst

Conveys a letter from Tucker on the Court House and Gaol in St. Johnís, and the material alterations and improvements needed thereto. Deficiencies of the existing structures (the cells in the gaol "are little better than mere cellars," "neither wholesome nor secure"). Reference to the cases of William Armstrong and James Lahey (Lahey had escaped from the existing gaol), and of James Power and James McCabe (see previous volume)

201-201v

27 June 1826

-

-

A note on Cochraneís report on the deficiencies of the existing court house and gaol, and on his wish for a new Court House and Gaol ("after the plan of an English Gaol" and capable of holding 50 prisoners). The estimated cost comes to £5000.

203-206

27 June 1826

Tucker

Brenton

On the Report from Lt. Col. Lewis on the plans and estimated cost of Cochraneís desired enlargement. Escape of Lahey led to a study of the existing gaol and the conclusion that it could not really be improved. Inadequate for the number of prisoners passing through it (greatest number at any one time has been 37). "...when the object to be obtained is the reformation of many human beings, by giving them the advantages of moral instruction and industrious habits, the expense attending the attainment of it becomes altogether a mere secondary consideration". All the more needed in a colony where so many are in a state of poverty which breeds crime

207-208

27 June 1826

Tucker

Cochrane

Regarding James Power, acquitted of murdering his wife on the basis of insanity, having contracted dysentery, bringing notice to the fact that "the cells of this Gaol are not properly ventilated". He suggests that Power be transferred to the hospital for the time being. He also asks that the cases of James Power, James M. Gabe, and William Armstrong once more be brought before Bathurstís attention (for more on these cases, see CO 194 71). Armstrong remained confined long time before he learned that he had been acquitted; must have suffered much as a result; deserves a pardon

209-210

15 Nov 1825

Tucker

Cochrane

An extract from a letter regarding improvements needed for the Courthouse, the steps taken to identify what needs to be done, and an estimate provided of the costs thereto.

211

24 Sept 1825

[?]

-

The aforementioned estimate, coming to £209..15..7

213-213v

-

-

-

An estimate for the painting and fitting out of the Supreme Court and Judges Chambers, coming to £70..5..5

215

29 June 1826

Cochrane

Bathurst

Transmitting printed copies of some additional rules and regulations framed for the Supreme and Circuit Courts.

217-218v

12 April 1826

Tucker, Molloy, Des Barres

-

The aforementioned "General Rules and Orders of the Supreme Court of Newfoundland"

219-219v

12 April 1826

Tucker, Molloy, Des Barres

-

Similar set of new rules for Circuit Courts

221-222

29 June 1826

Cochrane

Bathurst

Regarding his decision, in light of the undependability of routing mail through Halifax, to send his yacht (not having any use for it for "the next six or seven weeks") to England with despatches.

223-223v

26 July 1826

Cochrane

Bathurst

Transmitting a memorial from Mr. Hogsett, late deputy naval officer at St. Johnís; Cochrane is clearly sympathetic to Hogsettís situation.

225

27 July 1826

Cochrane

Bathurst

Transmitting a memorial from the Chamber of Commerce.

227-228

25 July 1826

Brooking

Bathurst

the petition of the Chamber of Commerce, on the recently expired commercial treaty between Great Britain and Portugal. Alarmed by the effect on fish trade of the duties recently imposed in Spain on imports of fish. Need to act vigorously to preserve trade. Contacts in Portugal warn that the Portuguese government is also thinking of raising duties. Desire a new Anglo-Portuguese commercial treaty to protect their interests

229-234v

12 Sept 1826

Cochrane

Bathurst

Regarding his suspension of Judge Molloy from his office and from the Council, transmitting papers showing the debts and "pecuniary embarrassments" in which he had involved himself without the means of extricating himself, which he calls "extremely discreditable to his high office". Evidence that Molloy "had been practising a course of deceit both on his Creditors and myself". A lengthy and detailed account of Molloyís various actions is provided

236-237

29 Aug 1826

Robinson & Brooking

Cochrane

A memorial on the debt owed them, and a bill dishonoured, by Molloy. Three Enclosures.

238

 

Molloy

Brooking

enclosed with the aforementioned memorial, copy of a bill drawn by Molloy upon Brooking.

239

13 May 1826

Brooking

Molloy

ditto, copy of a letter enquiring about the bill, which has not been paid.

240

18 May 1826

Molloy

Brooking

ditto, copy of a letter telling him to forward the bill, and that if it isnít paid, he will repay with his quarterly bill of £175 from Cochrane.

241

30 Aug 1826

Brenton

Molloy

requests an explanation of a memorial received from a Mr. Brooking.

242

31 Aug 1826

Molloy

Brenton

defending himself in reply to the aforementioned memorial from Brooking

243

1 Sept 1826

Brenton

Robinson & Brooking

replying to their memorial; passes on Molloyís letter of defence and indicates that Cochrane cannot act without more evidence

245-245v

1 Sept 1826

William Innott

(Harbour Grace)

Cochrane

A memorial regarding the debt incurred and still unpaid by Judge Molloy, with two enclosures. Mr. Stark had arranged with Innott for several rooms to be used by Judge Molloy, with assurances that he would be paid for them

246

Friday

Molloy

E.B. Brenton

Further Correspondence: enclosed in the previous memorial, a letter from Molloy telling him to call on him tomorrow at twelve, rather than today at eleven, as the Deputy Sheriff would prefer to discharge his account at the same time as another.

247

Saturday

Molloy

E.B. Brenton

enclosed in the previous memorial, a letter from Molloy apologizing for his negligence, having forgotten that the court would open today at 11, having been closed for some time, and thus unable to settle his debt that day. He schedules two oíclock on Monday to see to the matter before Cochrane.

248

-

Molloy

William Innott, Harbour Grace

the bill, enclosed in the previous memorial, incurred by Molloy for board and lodging in the Waterford Arms Hotel, from 13 May to 10 July "for self and Suite", amounting to £250..14..6.

250

1 Sept 1826

Brenton

Innott

Responding to the memorial, stating that Cochrane is "wholly unacquainted with the circumstances you have state, and cannot therefore authorize payment prayed for by your memorial".

252

1 Sept 1826

Brenton

Molloy

transmitting a copy of the previous memorial (and its enclosures), demanding an explanation.

252v

1 Sept 1826

Molloy

E.B. Brenton

his reply, calling the former memorial "wholly devoid of truth", and saying that once Stark (mentioned in the previous memorial) comes off duty from the courts tomorrow, he will attend on him, and then give a reply to Cochrane as satisfactory as the reply he gave concerning Brookingís memorial.

253-253v

2 Sept 1826

Molloy

Brenton

Giving his version of the events leading to the above memorial of Innott.

253v

2 Sept 1826

Molloy

Brenton

A private letter asking him to request Cochraneís permission to talk about private conversations they have had concerning the expenses incurred at Harbour Grace, as without such permission he cannot speak of them.

254-254v

3 Sept 1826

Brenton

Molloy

Saying that his former explanation is not satisfactory, asking in particular what authority he thought he had to mention the Governorís name, or make implications that he could be drawn upon in payment of these expenses, claiming also no recollection of having discussed these things at all with him, as he says in the two notes attached to the Memorial. Also, sending two more notes from Innott requiring his explanation.

255

Monday

Molloy

E.B. Brenton

Complains that Cochrane sent a note to Innott, saddling Molloy with the whole amount of the expenses incurred, and left Molloy to seek remuneration from Bathurst in whatever way he can, and that he is currently gathering the money together which he will send in the course of the day.

255

Tuesday

Molloy

E.B. Brenton

claiming that Cochrane wanted him out to breakfast; hopes that Cochrane will relent and pay the expenses after all, and asking him to call on him tomorrow at one.

256

3 Sept 1826

Molloy

E.B. Brenton

having received the previous letter with enclosed notes, he asks that his earlier reply might be returned to him, so he can write one more satisfactory to Cochrane.

256v

3 Sept 1826

Brenton

Molloy

transmitting, as requested, a copy of the reply he had previously made, that he might explain himself better a second time.

257

4 Sept 1826

Molloy

Brenton

Trying to defend himself better a second time. Claims he thought the public might defray his costs, as he was a judge on Circuit.

258-258v

2 Sept 1826

Tucker

Cochrane

Regarding a civil suit brought against Molloy by Robinson and Brooking, which caused much embarrassment as it could not be processed while Molloy still sat in the Supreme Court.

259-259v

2 Sept 1826

Brooking

-

"In the Central Circuit Court": the declaration of intention to sue, sworn by Thomas Holdsworth Brooking before George Washington Busteed.

260

     

A copy of the debt owed by Molloy to Robinson and Brooking, amounting to £447..11..6.

262-264v

4 Sept 1826

Robinson & Brooking

Cochrane

A memorial asking for the suspension of Molloy as Judge, so that they might proceed with their civil suit against him. With 9 enclosures.

266-272

-

-

-

the many and various documents enclosed in furtherance of their case and request in the aforementioned memorial.

273-273v

-

Molloy

E.B. Brenton

Asking to see him, and bring Mr. Brooking too, and stating his great anxiety, worsened by impending news of the death of his mother.

275-275v

Sunday

Molloy

Brenton

A most dejected letter whose conclusion states that "I think I had better resign my situation and at a prison or a pistol terminate my career".

277

5 Sept 1826

Molloy

Brenton

Regarding his suspension, which he feels unnecessary.

279-280

6 Sept 1826

Molloy

E.B. Brenton

Acknowledging a letter reporting his suspension, and asking for a leave of absence that he might "be enabled personally to report to Earl Bathurst the very serious attack which Your Excellencys Council have advised you to make on the High Office His Majesty had been pleased to confer on me by his Royal Charter".

280-280v

8 Sept 1826

Brenton

Molloy

Stating that as he is no longer considered to hold any office in the Island, his request for leave of absence is redundant.

281-286v

12 Sept 1826

Hugh Richardson Douglas

Bathurst

A memorial, concerning a number of bills drawn on him by Molloy, which should have been paid by his agents Goode and Clark in England, but none of which were honoured. Promises of payment made and not kept etc. Amount due is £510..18..3. Having looked everywhere else, he now asks Bathurst for relief.

287

31 Mar 1826

Molloy

Robert Gwilt, Agent for Nfld

Instructions from Molloy for the Agent of Nfld to pay Douglas his salary of £350; notably without the certification from the Governor.

287v-288

17 Junw 1826

William Grain

-

Copy of testimony of the promised arrangements for payment via English Bankers made by Molloy and subsequently broken.

288-288v

17 June 1826

Robert Gwilt

-

Stating his inability to comply with requests for payment out of Molloyís salary.

290-291

12 Sept 1826

Cochrane

Bathurst

Recommending Mr. Edward Brenton to take Molloyís seat on the bench.

292-294

12 Sept 1826

Cochrane

Bathurst

Suggesting, in light of the recent happenings with Molloy, that the Judgesí salaries be increased, in order to keep good judges in Nfld, which has genuine need of "Judges of first rate ability", he claims, more than any other spot, explaining his reasons.

296-296v

12 Sept 1826

Cochrane

Bathurst

Regarding Lieutenant Carterís appointment as Deputy Sheriff for Ferryland by the High Sheriff, and transmitting Buchanís explanation and another letter from him on the subject, for which reason he has also sanctioned Carterís retaining his position until the termination of the Southern Circuit.

298-299

12 Aug 1826

D. Buchan, High Sheriff

Brenton

the aforementioned letter from Buchan, defending his appointment of Carter as his Deputy for the Southern District.

300-300v

30 Aug 1826

Buchan

Brenton

the second aforementioned letter from Buchan, asking that Carter be allowed to retain his position at least until the close of this Circuit, lest great inconvenience be done.

302

30 Oct 1826

Cochrane

Bathurst

Acknowledging receipt of a number of itemized dispatches.

304-304v

30 Oct 1826

Cochrane

Bathurst

Acknowledging receipt of a letter regarding Government assistance to the Nfld School Society, and the support he subsequently extended to them

306

30 Oct 1826

Cochrane

Horton

Acknowledging receipt of an estimate noted to defray the expense of the Civil Establishment of Nfld for 1826.

308-309

10 Nov 1826

Cochrane

Bathurst

Acknowledging receipt of instructions regarding the Governorís authority over the military in Nfld.

310-313

10 Nov 1826

Cochrane

Bathurst

Regarding the deforestation of Nfld. since European contact and the advent of the fisheries; threat of deforestation on future fuel supply, threat to continued conduct of the fishery; wasteful practices; recommended measures to reverse the trend

314-314v

10 Nov 1826

Cochrane

Bathurst

Transmitting a memorial from Mr. Busteed concerning his position and fees as Chief Clerk of the Supreme Court; Cochrane includes his thoughts on the merits of the request

316-320

10 Nov 1826

Cochrane

Bathurst

Regarding the inefficiency of the Church Establishment; basically, too few clergy for the size of the population, the size of the island, and the dispersed nature of the people; tendency for people to turn to itinerant ministers or to Catholicism (as in St. Maryís) and other Protestant denominations. Recommendation for more support by government for the Anglican Church. Discussion of policy regarding salaries for the (Anglican) clergy

322-323

25 Nov 1826

Des Barres

Brenton

An extract of a letter, regarding the Church Establishment; on the coast from Cape LaHune east and north to Ferryland there is not one Anglican clergyman. Reports on situation at Burin, Placentia; report on the dearth of religious teachers on that coast (two Wesleyan, two Catholics) residing at "Green Bank [Grand Bank?] near the entrance of Fortune Bay Burin and at the old Town of Placentia. Recent new Marriage Act means that no one is qualified to perform marriages, so that "the men remain in a State of Celibacy, intermixing promiscuously with the sex and families are abandoned to wretchedness and misery" [this does not make complete sense]

324-325

10 Nov 1826

Cochrane

Bathurst

Regarding the establishment of the British Metallic Currency in Nfld. Despite infusions of coin into the local economy (£5000 in 1825 and again in 1826), there is minimal success in getting coin to circulate. Why this is the case is explained in enclosed documents, but basically much more coin must be added to the economy (£20,000) before it will begin to circulate freely. Base coin should be recalled and only British coin and Spanish dollars at a fixed rate of exchange should be permitted

326-327v

10 Nov 1826

Brooking

Brenton

A letter from the chamber of commerce regarding British policy concerning currency, exchange rates, coinage in circulation

328-329v

19 Nov 1826

George Mannell

(Asst. Commissioner General)

Brenton

Giving, as requested, his opinion on the system for strengthening local economy through circulation of coinage and currency policy

330-330v

10 Nov 1826

Cochrane

Bathurst

Transmitting a copy of the minutes for the proceedings of the Board of Privy Council for the Island for the last six months, pursuant to Bathurstís instructions of 3 Sept 1825. Request for payment of Brentonís salary

332-333v

17 Nov 1826

Cochrane

Bathurst

Regarding the police establishment of St. Johnís and Cochraneís continued support for the proposals submitted in May; brief description of the nature and character of St. Johnís, "its lawless and disgraceful state" which makes a police necessary

335-337

27 Nov 1826

Cochrane

Bathurst

Transmitting his Account for the Rents leased or granted, accompanied by 16 receipts by which a credit balance remains in his hands of £176..19..1. Reference to a "Governors Cottage at Virginia Lake"; reference to the "complete Colony of Women and Children" introduced to the barracks when the Veterans Companies came to St. Johnís, and how the windows of the Governorís apartments look directly into the barrack yard which, during the summer, means exposure to "the Nuisances and noises of every description". With at least three more such summers to anticipate, Cochrane expanded a small cottage built during Pickmoreís administration, in which to escape and seek some quiet until the new Government House is built

340-342

     

the aforementioned account, amounting to £1933..12..2 1/2 Currency, £1675..15..11 Sterling

344-349v

27 Nov 1826

Cochrane

Bathurst

the aforementioned receipts, which are many and varied (such as the vessels hired or employed in the administration of Nfld), with descriptions and explanations.

350v-357

 

Cochrane

Treasury

Cochraneís General Account Current with the Lords of the Treasury for the year 1826, amounting to £18818..18..6 Currency, £15443..1..7 1/2 Sterling.

358-359

27 Nov 1826

Cochrane

Bathurst

Regarding the compensation allowance for Mr. Noble, Naval Officer.

360

     

the calculation for the compensation of Mr. Noble, amounting to £439..9..10

362

29 Nov 1826

Cochrane

Bathurst

Transmitting a report from the Commanding Royal Engineer regarding the state of Fortifications at St. Johnís.

364-366v

27 Nov 1826

G. G. Lewis

Cochrane

the aforementioned report on the state of the fortifications at St. Johnís.

368-370

1 Dec 1826

Cochrane

Bathurst

Apologizing for the delay in sending the Returns of the Fishery, as information is slow to come in from the outports. He does however make some report on the Cod fishery, saying that while the fishery in Labrador was abundant, overall the quantity was a third less than the average for the last ten years, and the number of inferior fish has doubled. The fishery can be said to have failed in all parts except in the Northward parts, and was especially bad in the southward parts.

372

1 Dec 1826

Cochrane

Bathurst

Transmitting a memorial from Messrs Ayre and Templeman, recommending them to his favourable consideration, and asking that he might raise their salaries by £50 per annum to be charged to his annual Treasury Account.

374-375v

30 Nov 1826

Joseph Templeman & Christopher Ayre

Cochrane

the aforementioned memorial, regarding their salaries of £200, which, with the very high price of provisions, is proving inadequate.

376-378

13 Dec 1826

Cochrane

Bathurst

Regarding the ship of war which will not, after all, be wintering in Nfld, for which Cochrane expresses great regret, as Nfld of all places needs a warship in the event of untoward occurrences in the outports.

380

29 Nov 1826

R. Adm. Lake

(Jupiter, Halifax)

Cochrane

a letter expressing the fact that a ship of war will not be sent to winter in Nfld this year.

382-383v

12 Oct 1825

Cochrane

R.Adm. Willoughby Lake

a letter sent on his taking up his commission, regarding the need for a ship of war to continue to be wintered in Harbour Grace. Apparently Lake felt that Harbour Grace security needs could be covered by military forces detached from St. Johnís; Cochrane (based on the advice of the garrison commander) disagrees. Military are needed to support the civil power, and the naval forces traditionally stationed in Nfld are therefore the minimum required and should not be reduced (mentions a past incident when 1,500 armed men were prevented from plundering Harbour Grace by the presence there of naval forces

384-385v

19 Dec 1826

Cochrane

Bathurst

On the public relations damage incurred by Molloy upon the general respect for the Judgeís bench, and how it must be remedied.

386-387

26 Dec 1826

Cochrane

Bathurst

Asking that in the Governorís absence, the Government House not be moved into by the person left in charge of the administration, but only used on particular occasions.

388

30 Dec 1826

Cochrane

Bathurst

Transmitting both the Return of the Fishery and the Account of Imports and Exports.

390

-

-

-

Return of the Fishery for the year ending 30 June 1826.

390v

-

-

-

Account of the Seal Fishery for the same.

391-391v

-

-

-

Account of the Imports and Exports for the same.

Index

393-400v

-

-

-

The index of Cochraneís correspondence.

End of Volume 72