CO 194/45 [Reel B-681 ]

Page

Date

From whom (where)

To whom (where)

Contents or nature of the document

1-4v

25 Jan. 1806

Gov. Erasmus Gower (Hermitage Horndean)

Lord Castlereagh

Concerning the decayed condition of the house at present occupied by the Missionary of the Established Church at St. John's (i.e., the SPG Missionary). Recommends 700 to build a new house for him. Rents and money from the inhabitants should cover the rest of the cost.

5-6v

31 Jan. 1806

E. Gower, Hermitage Horndean

Lord Castlereagh

Gower transmits an account of the rents received from the lands in the vicinity of St. John's. Gower suggests that a sum of money collected from rents be used to build and repair churches, for support to the churches and the magistracy. He also prays for financial support to go towards the schools of Industry in St. John's for education of children in religion and skills B net mending (boys) and spinning and knitting (girls). The schools have been supported by the "Society for Improving the Condition of the Poor" in St. John's. He also wants to prevent the increase of Roman Catholic Schools.

7-14

Ditto

Ditto

   

[Enclosed with above] An Account of lands leased in the vicinity of St. John's. to the Inhabitants of that place by Vice Admiral James Gambier and Vice Admiral Sir Erasmus Gower, on behalf of the Crown, in the year 1803, 1804, and 1805.

15-16v

13 Feb. 1806

Erasmus Gower

William Windham

Concerning the trade to the West Indies and the British Isles. The governor received a letter from the Chief Justice of the island who is well informed on the trade and fishery. 100,000 quintals of fish now remain in St. John's and as the combined trade of the Out Harbours is greater than that of St. John's, and both have been equally affected by the deficiency of the exports, it may be concluded that an equal quantity of fish remains in other parts of the island. The governor is anxious to be able to send the fish to the British West Indies. One shilling per quintal should be given on all fish sent to the West Indies. The price of salted meat from Britain and from the United States is also discussed here. A big number of writs for debts were taken to the Supreme Court here at the close of the fishing season. Merchants sustained a great number of debts from the Planters. This is caused by the excessive price of provisions and other supplies for the fishery and the low price for fish and oil.

17-18v

13 Feb. 1806

E. Gower

William Windham

State of the Fishery and Trade for 1804, a Return of the Fishery and Inhabitants with observations, an Account of the fishery's exports between 1803-1804; an account of Imports during the same period; an Account of vessels built in 1804, the prices of provision and other commodities and an account of wages paid to seamen and fishermen.

19-19v

Ditto

Ditto

Ditto

[Enclosed with above] State of the fishery for 1804; also, accounts of the Winter Seal, Spring Seal, and Salmon Fisheries .

20-40v

Ditto

Ditto

Ditto

[Enclosed with above] A Explanatory Observations on the Accompanying Return of the Fishery and Inhabitants of Newfoundland for 1804.@ Subjects discussed: increase of population; ancient practice of sending ships from Europe is replaced by procuring fish from Planters; the rise of the resident fishery; reasons for the decline of European bank fleet; decline of the resident bank fishery; sack ships and the nursery for seamen; ships from the colonies on the Continent; ships from the West Indies; the trade between West Indies and Nfld is carried by subjects from Bermuda; ships from the United States (trade should be facilitated and extended); vessels on the North Shore; the French fishery; young Irish men brought in for the shore fishery; wages; the number of servants is greatly reduced; Dieters and recruiting (A many of these men might be induced to enter into the Fencible Regiments raising in the Island@ ); price of passage; number of boats kept by fishing ships and byeboat keepers; number of boats kept by fishermen; number of men in the fishery; quintals of fish made and more; truck with the Indians and an account of a woman taken in 1800 by a man named Cull who lived with his family for two years and was returned to her people (pp.29-30); ship rooms and fishing rooms; acres of land improved; private houses, public houses, winter inhabitants, herring fishery and Jamaica, Protestants and Roman Catholics.

41-42

Ditto

Ditto

Ditto

[Enclosed with above] Exports of the fishery Oct. 1803 - Oct. 1804.

43-43v

Ditto

Ditto

Ditto

[Enclosed with above] Imports into Newfoundland between 11 Oct. 1803 and 10 Oct. 1804.

44-46v

Ditto

Ditto

Ditto

[Enclosed with above] Wages paid to Fishermen and Shoremen in Newfoundland in the year 1804.

47-47v

Ditto

Ditto

Ditto

[Enclosed with above] Prices of Provisions and other Commodities in Newfoundland in the year 1804.

48-49v

16 April 1806

E. Gower, Suffolk Street

William Windham

A permanent secretary is needed for efficient government in Newfoundland.

50-53v

10 April 1806

Jos. Townsell

Erasmus Gower

Townsell supports idea of a permanent secretary who would be well acquainted with the trade and fishery. He suggests that he might be the best person for the job as he has served with the Navy as a Clerk Purser for twenty seven years, four of which has been in Newfoundland. He asks Gower to support him.

54-56v

19 April 1806

E. Gower, London

William Windham

This letter is about limiting the number of houses and shops built on the beach in St. John's as they interfere with the trade. He has begun to build a road 200 yards from the sea for the purpose of building houses. Some people have been inconvenienced but were given a piece of land in return. There still remain some landowners who will not relinquish their lands for the road. He is requesting if he could have some legal counsel on his right to dispossess the landowners of their rights to these pieces of land. He also requires legal counsel about a little house that stands in the middle of a road, leaving only 7 feet for passage, hampering the fire Engines from passing through. The house was once a cook room but has now been converted into a shop.

57-58v

19 April 1806

E. Gower, London

William Windham

The Public service was greatly improved with the distribution of coins; he recommends that steps be taken to send, by the flagship, 7,000 pounds in Spanish Dollars and 500 in copper two penny and penny coins.

59-60v

21 April 1806

E. Gower, London

Windham

This relates to the Nova Scotia Fencibles serving in Newfoundland.

61-63

29 April 1806

E. Gower, London

William Windham

Concerning the establishment of government and the difficulties encountered due to some parts of the Acts of Parliament encouraging settlement and other parts discouraging it. The residency pattern has become wholly sedentary. Some regulations have becomes obsolete, or ill adapted to suit the needs of the Fishery. Note: The document that he sends with this letter is a series of observations on his instructions. He provides a very detail description of each article and comments on its need for reform.

63v-100v

[Enclosed with above] The following document is entitled "Observations on certain Parts of His Majesty's Instructions to the Governor of Newfoundland." Due the enormous amount of information contained in this set of documents, only a very brief account will be provided.

63v-64

   

             

[Enclosed with above] Article 2nd is discussed.

64v-69

    

       

[Enclosed with above] Article 3rd is discussed.

70-81

   

       

[Enclosed with above] Article 5th is discussed.

81v-83

   

       

[Enclosed with above] Article 6th, 12th and 15th.

83v-85

   

       

[Enclosed with above] Article 16th, 17th.

85v-86v

   

       

[Enclosed with above] Article 22nd.

87v-88

6 Feb. 1805

E. Gower

Earl Camden

[Enclosed with above] Appendix A: Ancient Fishing Rooms and the appropriation of grounds not used anymore.

88v-90

   

       

[Enclosed with above] Appendix B: Proclamation in regards to the road being built in St. John's.

90-90v

24 Oct. 1804

E. Gower, Townsell

   

[Enclosed with above] A By His Excellency Sir Erasmus Gower...@ A sum of 200-500 pounds to each house according to size that shall be built by the New Road shall be paid into a Fund for Charity.

90v-93

   

       

[Enclosed with above] Appendix C: Example of a legal Form of Lease.

93v-95

21 Aug. 1804

Gower

     

[Enclosed with above] Appendix D: Proclamation directing all Surrogates to take an account of the Fishing Rooms, Beaches, flakes, Wharfs, Slips, Store Houses and other erections whatsoever, within two thousand yards distance of the high-water mark.

95v

19 Nov. 1804

Gower

   

[Enclosed with above] Extract of a letter sent to Earl Camden.

96-97v

   

         

[Enclosed with above] Appendix F: Extract of Observations on the Fishery relating to the extinction of Bye-Boat keepers.

98

  

     

[enclosed with above] Appendix G: A brief Account of the Vessels who visited here from Great Britain, Foreign Europe, West Indies, Colonies or Continent, United States in 1787, 1788, 1789 and 1805.

98v

April 1806

Gower

   

[Enclosed with above] A table showing the increase of Shipping entered inwards, and Winter inhabitants of St. John's between 1781-1805.

99-100

    

       

[Enclosed with above] Blank pages

100v

   

       

[Enclosed with above] Endorsement.

101-102v

17 June 1806

E. Gower, Isis at Spithead

   

Not having received any reply from the letters he sent to Lords Castlereagh dated 28 Nov. and the 25 and 31 Jan. last and to Windham on 19, 21, and 29 of April, he begs leave that he has received instructions to proceed without loss of time to his government.

103-104v

18 June 1806

E. Gower, Isis at Spithead

William Windham

Lord Castlereagh has sent me instructions which I only recently received and which will be carried out on my return to St. John's. Repairs to the wharf have to be equally sustained by the Ordnance and Contingent Departments. A private wharf might be hired at a considerable expense. General Skerrett has made encroachments on the Ordnance land. Mr Brophy has extended his wharf. The Powder shed on Signal Hill has to be relinquished. No fires shall be lit on the barrens that may endanger the Powder Shed. Other issues of land property are discussed.

105-106v

30 July 1806

E. Gower
(Fort Townsend)

    

Gower is pleased to say that trade between Newfoundland and the West Indies is successful. The Bank Fishery has thus far been very successful and favourable accounts have been received of the Shore Fishery in most parts of the island.

107-108v

18 Aug. 1806

E. Gower
(Fort Townsend in St. John's)

William Windham

The Outhouses at the Government House are decayed. The Auditor's Office will assign me vouchers only if I have the approval of the Treasury or of the Secretary of State.

109-112v

20 Oct. 1806

E. Gower
(Fort Townsend)

William Windham

The salaries of the Officers of the Supreme Surrogate Courts of this Island have been paid and he transmits a record  (pp.111-112v).

113-116v

24 Oct. 1806

E. Gower
(Fort Townsend)

William Windham

Gower explains that the expenses of repairing the jail will be reimbursed to the High Sheriff public Account. He has given assent to levy a tax on the inhabitants for the building and repair of the jails, prosecution of criminals, etc. The increase of mercantile establishments and the lodging of their families have increased the value of the lands in St. John's. Large revenues are drawn from them by people who once lived in Newfoundland but now live in Great Britain. The revenues amount to 15-20,000 pounds. A levy might be placed on the rent paid by every tenant in the occupation of any fishing room, House or land whatsoever. Such a regulation is required for other districts outside St. John's. The Magistrates of Conception Bay want to have a Peace Office in every Harbour. He had to refuse their demand because the treasury could not take on their burden.

117-118v

20 Oct. 1806

E. Gower, Fort Townsend

Gentlemen of the Grand Jury

Because of an expense that had to be drawn on the treasury of 300 for the repair of the jail and the function of the Court, Gower has directed that for the present year, the disbursements for this District shall be extracted from the General Account. Mr. Rennies' letter is mentioned about levying a fine on chimney fires.

119-120v

22 Oct. 1806

D. Rennie (Grand Jury)

E. Gower, Court House

The Grand Jury cannot take fees other than free subscriptions. It cannot agree to the proposal and have no other alternatives to suggest. The amount of money needed would be a burden on the community, due to a weak economy, but nothing to His Majesty's Treasury.

121-122v

24 Oct. 1806

E. Gower
(Fort Townsend in St. John's)

William Windham

Concerning a memorial of Richard Fletcher and a Fishing Room in Conception Bay.

123-124v

26 Sept. 1798

Surrogate Court, Cha. Garland [?]

     

Extract from the Surrogate Court at Harbour Grace in Conception Bay. William Mullowny vs. John Cummins. "Action for Debt for 27 pounds due for Goods Sold and Delivered and the purchase money of a Plantation. Writ Issued Returnable the 29th Oct. next."

125-126v

30 Sept. 1806

William Mullowney

    

Fletcher who owned that Fishery in Northerbay quitted the place in 1775. His place became a waste ground. In 1786 Keef Hans of Bristol built a Fishing Room and came to a failure. Everything was sold at public Auction and purchased by Mr John Webb. Mr Webb's declining trade caused Mullowney to have to dispose of the room to any person that may purchase it. He sold it to John Cummins for 30 pounds payable in three years.

127-132v

24 Oct. 1806

E. Gower, Fort Townsend

William Windham

Concerns the Nova Scotia Regiment, the Volunteer Companies, rules and regulations ( he is transmitting a copy). The volunteers assembled in the Court of Sessions under Arms, nearly all in uniform, and took the oath of allegiance. He presented the officers with their commissions with a Union Flag. 1032 were issued for 258 volunteers. The Adjutant, Drill sergeants and Drummers also need pay. General Skerrett is asked to issue rations to the volunteers. Note:

133-143v

Ditto

E. Gower

      

[Enclosed with above] Rules and Regulations for the Volunteers Army Corps, and Commissions of officers. Address to The Loyal Volunteers of St. John's.

144-145v

21 Oct. 1806

Nathan Parker (Commander of the Loyal Volunteers of St. John's)

Gov. Erasmus Gower

[Enclosed with above] The Loyal Volunteers received the Governor's Address communicated by Joseph Townsell, Esq. The Volunteers demonstrated their loyalty and their gratitude. Signed by J. Williams, Alex Boucher, Thomas Williams, Henry Batten (Captains)

146-146v

21 Oct. 1806

E. Gower

    

[Enclosed with above] Account of the money for clothing issued to the Loyal Volunteers of St. John's.

147-148v

21 Oct. 1806

Nathan Parker

E. Gower

[Enclosed with above] Muster Roll of the Volunteers Corps. Here are a few names selected at random: Parker's Company: Daniel Tracey, William Freeman, John March, John Dooly; Captain Williams company: Henry Duggan, John Wood, Patrick Brazil; Boucher's Company: Michael Murphy, John Sheals, Edward White; Capt. T. Williams Company: Patrick Power, Edward Angel, James O'Rourke; Captain Battens Company: John Cuthbert, George Kelland, James Dickers. Note: the occupation of each man is given. Some of these are: Cooper, fishermen, tailors, carpenters, accountants, shoemakers, farmer, (butcher, baker, mason- only a few.)

149-150v

24 Oct. 1806

Gen. Skerrett, Commander of H.M.'s Forces in Nova Scotia.

William Windham, Colonial Minister, War Department

Skerrett is sceptical that the volunteer militia will be very helpful in defending the fishery, because the militiamen are employed in the fishery and working when the island is most vulnerable to attack. Skerrett would prefer to recruit men into the regular army, but complains about various problems that make recruiting in Newfoundland difficult.

151-151v

24 Oct. 1806

Gower

Skerrett

[Enclosed with above] Extract of a letter sent to Skerrett from Governor Gower about The Volunteers Army Corps's request for rations.

153-153v

22 Aug. 1805

Lord Castlereagh, Downing Street

E. Gower

[Enclosed with above] Extract of a letter giving the Governor authorization to give rations two days in the week and four pounds for clothing to each person Gower allows to enlist. When called into service, they shall be entitled to the same pay as Volunteers in Great Britain.

155-165

9 Nov. 1806

E. Gower
(Isis,
Spithead)

William Windham

He is unable to provide a full account of the fishery of this season. The fishery has been productive and the spring seal fishery has been more productive this year than any other years. The price of fish is so low that it leaves no profits for the Planters. Trade to Portugal is stopped because of poor profits, the trade to the West Indies has been beneficial (Barbados, St. Vincent, Grenada.) No fish has been admitted to these islands from the U.S. A considerable quantity of fish has found its way to Jamaica and Demerara. Gower talks about duties, dried fish and the United States, the loss of trade with Spain and Portugal, He has granted licenses for the importation of bread and flour from the United States. Note: And more.

166-167v

20 Oct. 1806

Skerrett

    

[Enclosed with above] State of His Majesty's Forces serving in the Island of Newfoundland under the Command of Major General Skerrett.

168-169v

4 Oct. 1806

Capt. Ross, Royal Engineers (St. John's)

E. Erasmus

Report upon the State of the Fortifications at St. John's. Description of Signal Hill, Fort Townsend, Fort Amherst, Fort William, etc.

170-172v

7 Oct. 1805

Gov. Erasmus Gower

copy to Privy Council

Proclamation to organize a militia defence and to register fishing servants for that purpose; reference to "Keeper of the Rolls" and to the Royal Corps of Volunteers

173-174

Sept. 1806
(submitted 9 Nov. 1806)

Gov. Erasmus Gower

to the Privy Council

Questions & answers regarding American fishery on the Labrador coast in 1806 (numbers, how many ships, volume of fish caught, wages, etc.), collected by Capt. Thomas Innes, HM Sloop Childens

175-175v

Sept. 26, 1806

J. Skerrett
(St. John's)

Gov. Erasmus Gower

Letter supporting the recruitment of volunteers for the militia. Letter also contains comments on lack of provisions to give the fisherman of the volunteer corps.

177-177v

Oct.5,1806

J. Skerrett
(St. John's)

Gov. Erasmus Gower

Letter reaffirms support for a volunteer corps. States that volunteers should be taken from among the shore-men, not men employed in the Bank fishery.

179-180v

Nov.9, 1806

Gov. Erasmus Gower
(Isis, Spithead)

William Windham

Letter concerning the payment for repairs and services pertaining to the Governor's House. Gower also complains about the Acting Commissary for Stores and Provisions because he is responsible for reimbursing tradesmen for working on the house. Gower had to pay for the repairs out of his own purse. He sends with this letter, a letter written by the Acting Commissioner of Stores and Provisions to Gower.

181-182

25 July, 1806

Thomas Forth Winter, Acting Commissary

Gov. Erasmus Gower

A cover letter explaining several letters (copies number 1, 2, and 3 below) relating to his authority to carry out the work that Gower mentions in his letter to Windham above, on the Governor's House

183

9 July, 1805

M. Sturges Bourne (Treasury)

Thomas Forth Winter, Acting Commissary

Letter concerning payment for repairs done of the Governors House

183v

9 July 1805

M. Sturges Bourne

Thomas Forth Winter, Acting Commissary

Copy of the same letter shown on 183.

184

ditto

ditto

ditto

ditto

185

8 Jan. 1806

James Banke, Office for Auditing the Public Accounts

Thomas Forth Winter, Acting Commissary

Letter concerning payment for repairs on the Governors House.

186-187

18 Aug., 1806

Gov. Erasmus Gower
(Fort Townsend)

Thomas Forth Winter, Acting Commissary and Storekeeper

Letter telling Winter that it is his responsibility to pay the debts owing for repairs done on the Governor's House.

188-188v

14 Dec. 1805

J. M. Leake and J. Erskine of the Comptrollers Office

Lords of the Treasury

Letter regarding payment of repairs on the Governors House. The Treasury states the Commissary and Storekeeper is responsible for the accounts of the concerning the Governors house.

189

11 Oct. 1806

Thomas Forth Winter, Commissary of the Storekeepers Office (St. John's)

Gov. Erasmus Gower

Winter states that he will forward the money owed Gower for repairs done on the Governors House as soon as the Lords of the Treasury gave orders to do so.

191-192

11 Oct. 1806

Gov. Erasmus Gower
(Fort Townsend)

Thomas Forth Winter, Commissary of Storekeepers
(St. John's)

Concerning the Commissary of Stores= responsibility to pay for maintenance on the governors house. Letter also contains Gower's annoyance at the situation as well as promise to take the issue to His Majesty's Government.

 

193

24 Oct. 1806

Gov. Erasmus Gower
(Fort Townsend)

Thomas Forth Winter, Commissary of Storekeepers
(St. John's)

Asks Winter to make an inventory of the Governor's house while the Governor is away for the winter. Gower also asks Winter to find a person to take care of the house and then pay him ten pounds for the service.

195

24 Oct. 1806

Gov. Erasmus Gower
(Fort Townsend)

Thomas Forth Winter, Commissary of Storekeepers
(St. John's)

Directs Commissary of Storekeepers to give the governor's gardener (Simon Mills) his customary ration of provisions and an allowance of coats.

197

24 Oct. 1806

Thomas Forth Winter, Commissary of Storekeepers Office
(St. John's)

Gov. Erasmus Gower
(Fort Townsend)

Winter claims he cannot appoint a person to take care of the Governor's house or pay anyone for services rendered on the house until Major General Skerrett orders him to do so. He also asserts that an action of law had been taken against Winter over the affair.

199

23 Dec. 1806

Gov. Erasmus Gower (Hermitage)

William Windham

Cover letter for Return of the Fishery & Inhabitants for 1805 (see next).

 

 

201

23 Dec. 1806

-

-

State of the Fishery & Inhabitants for 1805. This includes an inventory of people and property from various settlements including St. John's, Ferryland, Trepassey, Placentia, Fortune Bay, Conception Bay, Trinity, Bonavista, and Fogo, as well as sub-settlements of these areas.

Page after 201, has no number (is not 202)

23 Dec. 1806

-

-

Document included on this page are titles as follows: Account of the Winter Seal Fishery, Account of the Salmon Fishery, Account of the Spring Seal Fishery, and Bank Fishery from Great Britain.

202-205

23 Dec. 1806

Gov. Erasmus Gower

William Windham

"Explanatory Observations on the Return of the Fishery and Inhabitants of Newfoundland for the year 1805". These notes include a discussion the success of the various fisheries, the number of boats from Britain as opposed to Newfoundland, over-all estimates of the catch that year etc. The document also discusses a number of women who had immigrated from Ireland to Newfoundland in 1805.

207-208

21 Dec. 1806

Major General J. Skerrett

William Windham (Secretary of State for the Colonial Department)

Letter requesting more provisions for the navy. Skerrett commends Thomas Forth Winter's performance as the Commissary of Stores and Provisions.

209-212v

21 Dec. 1806

Major General J. Skerrett

Secretary of State, William Windham

Letter concerning the formation of a volunteer corps. Skerrett states that a temporary volunteer corps cannot provide adequate protection. He wants to form a permanent force (gives reasons). Discusses frustrations in trying to assist efforts of Nova Scotia Regiment to recruit soldiers in Nfld; complains his recruiting efforts are not appreciated or properly reimbursed. Emphasizes importance of defending the fishery ("gold mine of England"). Goes on at great length concerning the importance of his work in Newfoundland.

 

215

8 Jan. 1806

W. Gordon

E. Cooke Esquire

Cover letter for enclosed documents concerning the recruitment of regiments stationed in Newfoundland. The letter states that the enclosed correspondence was to be reviewed by Lord Castlereagh.

217

28 Nov. 1805

William Gardiner
(Halifax, N.S.)

Colonel Gordon

Cover letter for correspondence between Skerrett and Gower. These letter discuss the problems of recruitment in Newfoundland. Gardiner hopes that these letters will inform the Secretary of State about these problems and accordingly remove the obstacles.

219

14 Oct. 1805

Gov. E. Gower

J. Skerrett

Letter asking Skerrett to make sure that men in the fishery or belonging to a trade ship not be recruited without the consent of his employer

221

15 Oct. 1805

Gov. Erasmus Gower
(Fort Townsend)

J. Skerrett

Letter again asking Skerrett to make sure that men involved in the fishery or shipping industry, were not recruited into the army.

223-223v

15 Oct. 1805

Gov. Erasmus Gower
(Fort Townsend)

Major General Skerrett

Gower explains why the recruiters from Nova Scotia must not take men from the shipping or fishing industries.

225-225v

17 Oct. 1805

Gov. Erasmus Gower
(Fort Townsend)

Major General J. Skerrett

Gower defines the term "legally shipped for the fishery" . He clarifies instructions given in a past letter (p. 223).

227-229

19 Oct. 1805

Major General Skerrett

Lieutenant General Gardiner

Skerrett complains about Gower's impediments to his recruitment campaign. Skerrett states that the merchants had given most men shipping papers, therefore these men could not be recruited. Skerrett complains that "everything is strained to serve the merchants" and this is killing recruitment.

231-232

22 Jan. 1806

Richard Fletcher

William Windham, Secretary of State for Colonial Possessions

Letter concerning the inheritance of Richard Fletcher from his father John Fletcher of St. Georges Parish Hanover Square, of Middlesex County. His grandfather, also named John Fletcher, lived in Northern Bay and owned two plantations, lands, buildings wharfs etc. This passed on to his son (the second John). John II was captured by the French and died in prison at which time the possessions of John II were passed on to Richard Fletcher. However, Richard was only 7 when his father died. Property fell into disuse. Years later, someone inquired about buying or renting the land etc. The rest of the letter is taken up with Richard's quest to gain power of attorney. Fletcher could not afford court fees so he is asking Windham to reinstate the properties to himself.

233-233v

4 Feb. 1806

W. Fawkener

Lord Castlereagh,
Principal Secretary of State

Concerning a request from merchants in Poole, England to import bread, flour, corn, butter and livestock to Newfoundland via the United States. The Lords of the Committee recommend that the King allow goods to be imported from the United States and he requests that the King sign the papers enclosed with the letter, concerning the importation of goods.

234

4 Feb.1806

-

-

License to import bread, flour, corn, butter, and livestock into Newfoundland via the United States. This document (enclosed with above letter p. 233) requires the signature of the King

235-236

-

W. H (?)

-

Letter stating that the King will allow the governor of Newfoundland to determine whether or not bread, flower, corn, butter and livestock will be imported to Newfoundland from the United States. However, these items must be transported from the United States by British subjects in British ships and only for the ensuing season

236v

   

-

-

Form of the License by the above Order (p. 235). This document is incomplete; may be missing a page

237-237v

18 April 1806

-

-

Concerning the promotion or recommendation of W. Fournell.

239-239v

13 May, 1806

-

-

Letter concerning correspondence from the desk of Gov. Gower to Lord Castlereagh and Sir Windham. This letter asks that he receive responses before he leaves for Newfoundland. Enclosed is a list of people from whom Gower needed to hear

241-242

-

Gov. Erasmus Gower

-

Document entitled, A Heads of Letters written by Erasmus Gower to Lord Castlereagh and Sir Windham to which answers are requested, before Sir Erasmus' departure for Newfoundland which is expected shortly.

245

16 May 1806

W. Gordon

Sir George Shee

Letter disallowing any other corps other than the Nova Scotia regiment to recruit in Newfoundland.

247-247v

19 May 1806

W. Fawkener, Office of Committee of Privy Council

Sir George Shee

Concerning alterations to previous instructions from the King having to do with regulation of the fishery.

249-250

24 May, 1806

W. Fawkener, Office of Committee Council for Trade (Whitehall)

Sir George Shee

Concerning alterations to previous instructions from the King having to do with the regulation of the fishery. Letter also discusses the appointment of a permanent secretary to the government of Newfoundland. Fawkener recommended a man named W. Frounsell for the position of secretary.

251-251v

2 June 1806

G. Harrison
(Treasury Chambers)

Sir George Shee

Letter telling Sir that the money requested for payment of the forces in Newfoundland, was being shipped from England.

253-261v

9 June 1806

Gov. Erasmus Gower (Hermitage)

Sir Stephen Gothrel

Responses to the Heads of Letters. This letter contains suggestions from Gower altering the law in regards to the regulation of the Fishery. Gower references the Fishing Act of William III as the basis for carrying on a bank and shore fishery. This act asserts that "the preferable privilege of Ancient Rooms" be given to British fishing ships. Gower suggests that this law be ignored for the time being and thus encourage residency. He also states that cultivation of the land will probably never yield more than a subsistence crop for those inhabitants involved with the fishery. The proposed measure (not stated) was meant to give people cheaper access to food. In regards to the question of whether or not Newfoundland should become a colony with it's own legislature, Gower rejects this idea. He also states that Newfoundland did not need its own laws and that the Courts, under the laws of England could tailor the law to the needs of the people. Gower goes on to discuss the religious beliefs of the inhabitants; he states that more than one half of the population was Roman Catholic and that the state should not interfere with the practice of religion. Gower also suggests the appointment of a Naval Officer, and a permanent secretary to the government. He also suggests that it would benefit the fishery if the Governor were present in Newfoundland year round. In terms of protection Gower recommends that a small squadron of ships be placed in the harbor during the fishing season in order to protect against attacks.

264-265

10 June 1806

N. Piggott and Sam Romilly
(Lincoln's Inn)

Joe. Genende

[copy sent to Erasmus Gower] Letter concerning the legality of Gower's suggestion regarding the Law of Ancient Rooms. Also discusses the legality of Gower tearing down a building on Main Street in St. John's.

266-266v

20 May, 1806

[Name Blacked Out]
(Downing Street)

[Name Blacked Out]

Cover letter for the above document [pg. 264-266].

263-270v

19 April 1806

Gov. Erasmus Gower

(London)

William Windham

Letter asking Windham whether or not he could confiscate the land of people living within one hundred yards of the shore, who did not participate in the fishery. He notes that this was done to people living in the area of St. John's. The law required that those who's land was taken were entitled to compensation.

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This document may have been included with the letter from Gower to Windham mentioned above, [p. 263-270]. The first page of the document may be missing. This document discusses the Acts of William III in relation to land ownership and the erection of buildings. This act clearly states that only buildings directly relating to the running of the fishery could be built within two hundred yards of high water.

276-279v

 

23 June 1806

 

W. Fawkener, Office of Committee of Privy Council for Trade
(Whitehall)

Sir George Shee

Letter stating that the Committee of the Privy Council for Trade agreed with the proposed alterations to the Kings order pertaining to the fishery. However, Fawkener also states that no changes can be made to the law until the alterations could be approved by the legislature. Those issues which did not need to be altered in the law are also addressed in this letter.

281-182v

2 July, 1806

Office of Ordnance

Sir George Shee

Letter regarding the "encroachments stated to have been made on the wharf and grounds belonging to the Ordnance Department."

283-284

 

2 July, 1806

W. Marsoen,
(Admiralty Office)

Sir George Shee

Letter telling that the survey of the coast should be postponed until after the war.

 

285-285v

30 Aug. 1806

W. Gordon

Sir George Shee

Letter offering compensation for the fishermen of Newfoundland for their generosity towards some soldiers who were stranded in Newfoundland, on their way to Quebec.

287-287v

5 July, 1806

Colonel Bowers (Quebec)

W. Gordon

[Enclosed with Above] Letter explaining that a man form Harbour Breton named Charles Augustus Cramer (magistrate) had written Colonel Bowers to tell him that Nais Transport was lost on the western part of the Island. All dies except for "five rank and file, and two seamen." The ship was lost on the 23 Oct., 1805 at Port aux Basques.

289-292

11 June, 1806

Charles Augustus Cramer, Justice of the Peace
(Harbour Breton)

General Hunter

[Enclosed with above] Letter containing the details about the shipwreck of the Nais and the care of the survivors.

293

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[Enclosed with above] List of commissioned officers onboard the Nais. Includes ranks and the names of the survivors.

293v-294

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Corporal Edward Cornwall

    

[Enclosed with above] This is a copy of a letter given to a crew of hunters from Harbour Breton. States that a man named Michael Gillian took in some survivors of the Nais shipwreck. The letter asks that a boat be sent to pick the survivors up as soon as possible (in the spring) so they could rejoin their regiment (100th regiment).

294-294v

7 May, 1806

John Collerd

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[Enclosed with above] This is a copy of a letter brought by Corporal Cornwall upon his arrival to the Cod Roy River. Letter states that John Collerd had kept two of the Nais shipwreck survivors for the winter and that he required payment for his services.

295-295v

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O'Brien

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[Enclosed with above] This is a copy of a memorandum delivered to Harbour Breton. This is the survival story of one of the individuals rescued by Michael Gillian. Only the survivors last name was given- O'Brien.

297-297v

2 Sept. 1806

Sir Frederick, (Horse Guards)

Sir William Windham

Letter telling Windham that the Nova Scotia regiment was recruiting soldiers in Newfoundland and that no other Corps were allowed to do the same. Letter also asks Windham, to ask Governor Gower to make sure that recruitment could only be conducted by the Nova Scotia regiment.

299

14 Aug. 1806

Major-General Skerrett

Colonel Gorden

[Enclosed with above] An extract of Skerrett's letter concerning prohibitions on recruitment in Newfoundland.

301

25 Oct. 1806

N. Vansittart, (Treasury Chambers)

Sir George Shee

Cover letter asking Shee to look over enclosed documents concerning the erection of a new provision store-house in Newfoundland.

303-303v

14 Nov. 1806

M. Harrison

N. Vansittart, Treasury

[Enclosed with above] Letter asking Vansittart to give opinion as to whether or not to pay the Bills Gov. Erasmus Gower had submitted for payment. Gower submitted two bills for payment: one for the clothing supplied to the Newfoundland volunteer corps and another bill for the payment of salaries for the Officers of the Supreme and Surrogate Courts of Newfoundland.

End of Volume 45