CO 194/42  [Reels B-679 & 680]

Page

Date

From whom (where)

To whom (where)

Contents or nature of the document

3-3v

22 Jan. 1799

Waldegrave (Portland Place)

D. of Portland

Cover letter with supporting documents relating to the condemned flour in store at the Garrison in St. John's.

5

20 Dec. 1798

Charleton

Waldegrave

[enclosed with above] Extract of a letter regarding the state of Flour. The Commissary of Provisions states that it is unfit to feed the Troops. Mentions Mr Epps' report. If Government decides to sell it, it would be more advantageous to condemn it.

7-7v

18 Dec. 1798

Epps

Charleton

[enclosed with above] The bakers have refused spoiled flour. At present there is enough flour to last 9 to twelve months. Flour was spoiled in shipping from Plymouth.

9

2 Feb. 1799

Waldegrave

D. of Portland

Waldegrave and Chief of Justice are in disagreement in relation to the duty of sixpence per gallon of rhum. Supporting documents are included.

11

30 Jan. 1799

Mr Routh

Waldegrave

[enclosed with above] Ministers want to raise a revenue on rum. Refers to a mix in letters but when he comes to town, he shall be happy to offer the best judgement about it.

13

10 Dec. 1798

Mr. Routh

The principal Merchants at St. John's.

[enclosed with above] Prior to the governor's departure, he wanted the Chief Justice (Mr. Routh) to inform the merchants of a duty of sixpence per gallon that shall be levied on rum and spirits. Waldegrave wants to know what the merchants think about it.

15-15v

12 Dec. 1798

Merchants

Mr. Routh

[enclosed with above] Copy of a letter sent by the merchants explaining their opposition to a tax on rum. This island is not viewed as a colony by the British government. Merchants are not allowed to build houses except for the express purpose of carrying the fishery. The poorer part of the island should be allowed to cultivate as long as it doesn't interfere with the fishery.

17-18

2 Feb. 1799

Waldegrave

Mr. Routh

[enclosed with above] Waldegrave regrets that Routh discussed the matter directly with Merchants. Whenever Ministers make a decision about a tax, they do not wish to consult merchants. But had they wanted to consult, it would have been done through the governor.

19-19v

19 Feb. 1799

Waldegrave (Portland Place)

D. of Portland

Cover letter and supporting documents relating to the poor state of churches.

21-21v

19 Dec. 1798

Hutchings, Bell, Gaden, Phillips, Cormack, Reed (St. John's)

Waldegrave

[enclosed with above] Materials brought on the Agincourt for the building of the Church in St. John's. 40 were saved in the freight. 800 will be required in the building of the church. The subscribers' contribution will be of 357. They turn to the governor for the rest of the money.

23-24v

19 Jan. 1799

Waldegrave (Portland)

Gentlemen

[enclosed with above] The governor raised 500 for the erection of the church. He purchased the materials himself and saved 15%. The gentlemen of the Church erection committee have asked for 800. He is not sure whether he wants to impose another cost to his Majesty. He encloses papers.

25

24 July 1797

Waldegrave

Committee for the building of the Church

[enclosed with above] Waldegrave endorses this project and will try everything in his power to see the church built.

27

7 Feb. 1798

Waldegrave (London)

The Archbishop of Canterbury

[enclosed with above] Thanks the Archbishop for donation to build the church in St. John=s. The Society for the propagation of the gospel donated 400. He does not have the plans and elevations of the Church because it is in the hands of the Duke of Portland.

29

24 March 1798

Waldegrave(London)

Duke of Portland

[enclosed with above] He asks who does he ask for the money (500) that was promised him by His Majesty for the building of the church in St. John's. And he asks for the plans and elevations to be returned. He informs Portland that the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel has donated 400.

31-31v

15 Feb. 1799

James Garland (Poole)

Waldegrave

[enclosed with above] The Gentlemen involved in the Trade in Newfoundland feel that they have already incurred a great expense in the erection of the church in St. John's as well as the ones they are supporting in the outports. They think that they should be exempted from paying more.

33

23 Feb. 1799

Waldegrave (Portland Place)

Portland

Cover letter regarding a letter from Mr. Eton, author of a book on the Turkish Empire. Expresses doubts of the practicability of the Trade of Salted Cod with Turkey. Distribution, time of war and raise the price. Perhaps herring would be better suited.

35-36v

20 Feb. 1799

William Eton (Worcester Coffee House)

Waldegrave

[enclosed with above] This is a detailed letter offering commercial advice about the eastern Mediterranean as a destination for the fish trade. Praises the advantages of a market in Turkey. Red Herrings, pickled, are loved in Turkey. The Greeks are not particular, send inferior quality. Black Sea, Asiatic and Russian markets could also be markets for cod. Suggests Constantinople, Smyrna and Acre etc. for trial shipment of cod followed by trading voyage to other eastern Mediterranean ports (mentioned). The Levant Company has to be abolished before trade can happen.

37-38

25 Feb. 1799

Waldegrave (Portland Place)

Duke of Portland

Cover letter with supporting material. The completion of the church in St. John=s. Workmen are threatening not to build the roof if they don't get a raise. He finds the Merchants of St. John's "illiberal and rapacious." An architect told Waldegrave that the estimate fell short of a few hundred pounds.

39-39v

29 August 1799

Roope, Newman, Ougier , Hutchings (Dartmouth)

Waldegrave

[enclosed with above] Thanks the governor for the funds and materials for the church. They are subscribing money for the church and they think that the Customs Officers will too.

41

27 Feb. 1799

Waldegrave

D. of Portland

Cover letter regarding the Chief Justice and whether they'd be allowed to retain fees for the Probates of Wills.

43-44

24 Feb. 1799

D'Ewes Coke (Poole)

Waldegrave

[enclosed with above] Retaining fees for the Probates of wills. Judge Reeves who founded the Court in 1791 gave Coke a Commission to be his surrogate with full power. Reeves gave Coke a list of fees that were to be taken. Coke felt entitled to these fees and Reeves supported that matter. A record is kept of these fees and everything is done by the book.

45-45v

26 Feb. 1799

Mr. Routh (Poole)

Waldegrave

[enclosed with above] There is a clause in the Act of Parliament that says a Chief Justice is allowed to take fees for the Probates of Wills as long as they are reasonable. He concludes by saying it would not be reasonable for a business to be transacted without payment for it.

47

7 March 1799

Waldegrave

Duke of Portland

The petition of Captain Frederic Warren, late Commander of his Majesty's Sloop Shark. A difficult case that Waldegrave leaves in the hands of Great Britain's lawyers.

49-49v

March 1799

Frederic Warren

Waldegrave

[enclosed with above] Petition of Frederic Warren. Routh is both Chief Justice and Customs Collector in Newfoundland. In 1798, the Deborah American Schooner was captured in the harbour of St. George. William Carter condemned it as prize to Warren who sold it to Ryan. Ryan wanted a register for it from Routh. Warren submits that Routh refused to issue a register because he has interest in it.

51

15 March 1799

Waldegrave (Portland Place)

Duke of Portland

Praises Portland for increasing the salaries of missionaries of the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts. It is impossible for a missionary to live with a salary less than 150 per annum.

53

4 April 1799

Waldegrave (Portland Place)

Duke of Portland

Relates to Mr Dingle's loss of property during the French invasion. Mr. Dingle needs a recommendation to become a missionary.

55-55v

26 April 1799

Waldegrave

D. of Portland

A Brigadier General is appointed to Newfoundland. As the Brigadier will take over the troops, he will need to take charge of the money of silver and copper. The Brigadier will need instructions from the Treasury as himself, the governor, will not be in charge of this duty anymore. The money in question has to be sent to Portsmouth first, then be delivered to the Brigadier at St. John's.

57

27 April 1799

Waldegrave

D. of Portland

Waldegrave asks whether he should pay the missionaries 50 out of the Island's Treasury or should he (the Duke) give instructions to the Treasury to pay the missionaries.

59-64

9 May 1799

Waldegrave (Portland Place)

D. of Portland

Market in the Levant (Eastern Mediterranean) for Newfoundland fish. Waldegrave explains the fish grading: the merchantable, the Italian Markets, Madeira fish, dumb fish, preservation techniques. He gives his opinion as to how to approach a market in the Levant. Due to distribution problems and privateers in the Mediterranean, perhaps government could run a small trial at Smyrna. The Newfoundland Fishery is declining so this might be a good thing to try.

65-67

20 October 1799

Waldegrave

D. of Portland

Waldegrave paid his Surrogates a sum of 460 Two of the Surrogates are Commanders of H.M Sloops. Mr Ogden's salary is greater due to his responsibilities. He deplores that he is forced to impose on government for money when duties on rum could pay salaries.

67v

Copy of an Extract of An Act 33 Geo 3. Determination and duties of Surrogates in Newfoundland.

69

20 October 1798

Richard Routh

Waldegrave

Declaration to the effect that in his capacity of Chief Justice, he never touched the sum of 290 collected from the fees in the Supreme Court.

71

20 October 1799

Waldegrave

 

Report and detailed account of all the fees in the Supreme Court.

72

20 October 1799

Routh

Waldegrave

Declaration of receipt of salary in the sum of 200.

74

20 October 1799

Henry Phillips

Waldegrave

Declaration of receipt of salary in his capacity of Sheriff, the sum of 140.

76

20 October 1799

William Freeman

Waldegrave

Received 36 (jailor and [town] crier.)

78

20 October 1799

Andrew Malony

Waldegrave

Received 26 (Marshall.)

80

20 October 1799

Jonathan Ogden

Waldegrave

Received 100 (Surrogate for St. John's and the whole Island.)

82

20 October 1799

Capt. Henry H. Odgetts

Waldegrave

Received 60 (Surrogate for the Island.)

84

20 October 1799

Capt. Schomberg

Waldegrave

Received 60 (Surrogate for the Island.)

86

20 October 1799

W. Carter (attorney)

Waldegrave

Received 60 (Surrogate for Ferryland.)

88

20 October 1799

Garland

Waldegrave

Received 60 (Surrogate for Harbour Grace)

90

20 October 1799

John Harries (attorney)

Waldegrave

Received 60 ( Surrogate for Trinity.)

92

20 October 1799

William Carter (attorney)

Waldegrave

Received 60 (Surrogate for Bonavista)

94

20 October 1799

Andrew Maloney

Waldegrave

Received 4 for services as Marshal of the Surrogate Court at St. John's.

96

20 October 1799

William Carter

Waldegrave

Received 4 for dispatching a messenger from Ferryland to St. John's when the "Enemy visited Newfoundland" in 1796.

98-100

21 October 1799

Waldegrave

Portland

Cover letter and supporting documents relating to the enlargement of Joseph Kavanagh (a hairdresser's house.) The house is to be built on a Ship's Room. This violates an Act of parliament that most poor fishermen know but not the Chief of Justice. The governor feels there was collusion.

102

8 October 1799

Joseph Kavanagh (St. John=s)

 

Waldegrave

[enclosed with above] Petition to build on King's Beach.

104

17 Dec. 1798

Routh, Carter, Buchanan, Harries, Epps, Elmes,...

Waldegrave

[enclosed with above] They have surveyed the land and certify that Kavanagh may safely build.

106

16 October 1799

Waldegrave

G. Williams

[enclosed with above] Ask Mr. Hutchings to help you determine whether the spot for Kavanagh's house is a Ship's Room.

108

17 October 1799

G. Hutchings and G. Williams

Waldegrave

[enclosed with above] They find that it is a Ship's Room.

110-110v

18 October 1799

Waldegrave (Fort Townsend)

Kavanagh and others

[enclosed with above] Waldegrave's answer to Kavanagh's petition. The permission granted to Mr. Kavanagh was given him with the assumption that the land would be properly surveyed and that it didn't come in violation to the inhabitant's private property rights. The construction of a house on a Ship's Room comes in violation of an Act of Parliament (Statute 10 and 11). The Petition is revoked.

112-114v

22 October 1799

Waldegrave

D. of Portland

Refers to a letter from Mr. Broom (Magistrate of Burin) on the subject of emigration to Nova Scotia and the United States. The Governor blames the Merchants who can set their own prices. The workers get indebted to the Merchants. This island is becoming a resident fishery. Please place this issue to the Lords of the Privy Council of the Committee of Trade. Even if licenses are issued to try to stop emigration, the deserters are simply dropped off creeks and outports.

116-119

25 October 1799

Waldegrave (Fort Townsend)

D. of Portland

Concerns the burial ground of St. John=s. Mr Thomas Babb of Newton Abbott sold his land to Mr Bell and Mr. Bell is raising the value of the land . The governor sees this as violating law. Asks Portland to intervene in this matter.

120-120v

3 Jan. 1799

Waldegrave (Portland Place)

Thomas Babb of Newton Abbott

[enclosed with above] The land adjacent to the church for burial ground. Asks that the land be surveyed.

122-123

7 Jan. 1799

Thomas Babb

Waldegrave

[enclosed with above] Waldegrave and Portland claim that Babb made an unreasonable claim to the land adjoining the burial grounds. He never received any prior information that government was interested in this land. He built a pathway for people to use to go to church and he had to reduce his tenant's rent for that. He never received compensation. His tenant was to keep the land and all erections in good repair which he hasn't done. You surveyed the land at "seven years" when it should be more.

124

11 Jan. 1799

Waldegrave

Mr Tomas Babb

[enclosed with above] Waldegrave thanks Babb for considering selling his land to government and indicates that he never mentioned Babb's name to Portland. He reaffirms that 7 years is ample compensation for the land.

126

10 October 1799

Waldegrave (Fort Townsend)

John Bell

[enclosed with above] Waldegrave explains that the land was supposed to have been sold to him for the purpose of expanding the burial ground. Is Bell willing to sell.

128

12 October 1799

John Bell (St. John's)

Waldegrave

[enclosed with above] Bell apologizes fro being unable to sell the "plantation" without first talking to his partners Cuninghame Stevenson and Co. of Port Glasgow.

130

19 October 1799

Ogden and Carter (St. John's)

Waldegrave

[enclosed with above] The land owned by Patrick Ryan that was surveyed and estimated was sold at public auction without their knowledge.

132-133

3 August 1758

J. Elliott

 

[enclosed with above] Governor Elliott allows John Saul to use Lily's Plantation as a fishing room to cure, salt and husband the fish and to keep it [N.B. 'Lily' is spelled 'Lillie' later in this volume]. This was allowed in an Act of Parliament in the 10th and 11th year of King William III. If John Saul desert or let the flakes fall to decay for one year, it will be granted to the first arrived.

134-136v

4 Nov. 1799

Waldegrave (Agincourt, at Sea)

D. Portland

Complains about the Merchant's and Mr. Routh's (Chief Justice) lack of respect for his position in refusing to come to great him upon his arrivals and departures. This makes a bad impression on the "lower orders" of inhabitants and could be dangerous.

138

7 Nov. 1799

Waldegrave (Agincourt)

D. of Portland

Because of the cruelties at Harbour Breton, in 1797, the Rambler (sloop) patrolled there. Capt. Schomberg said it was too perilous and unnecessary for it to stay there. The ship only carries 6 weeks provisions, it was thus placed at Fortune Bay.

140

30 Sept. 1799

Capt. Schomberg (Rambler, St. John=s)

Waldegrave

[enclosed with above] Gives an account of the conditions sustained by crew and ship during their stay in Harbour Breton. Rooms for provisions and stores were deteriorated and had to be rebuilt. Wind, and ice from the mouth of the Harbour threatened to cut cables. Placed spare top mast on the Bows to act as a bumper. The size of the Rambler makes her unfit to stay there. He only buried one man during his stay at Harbour Breton. Not a single trial or cause was submitted to him. The inhabitants go in the forest during the winter months.

142-142v

9 Nov. 1799

Waldegrave (Spithead)

D. of Portland

Returns can only make it in Jan.. Bad weather led to loss of fish (unable to cure) of 30,000. 46 vessels sailed to Portugal under the Convoy of Castor. The Seal fishery is doing well.

144

25 Jan. 1800

Waldegrave (Portland Place)

D. of Portland

Received letters and will forward to the Judge of the Vice Admiralty Court as early as possible.

146-146v

31 Jan. 1800

Waldegrave

D. of Portland

Contiguous land to the burial ground at St. John's. A supporting document should support his evaluation of seven years.

148

24 Oct. 1799

Carter, Harries, Ogden (St. John's)

Waldegrave

[enclosed with above] Properties were sold for lower prices (examples listed) and some of the land who was intended for the extension of the burial ground was sold for 240. The rents are 30 now and will be 50 soon.

150

10 Feb. 1800

Waldegrave (Portland Place)

D. of Portland

The Completion of the church at St. John's. Waldegrave asks for permission to give the committee 200.

152-153

29 Dec. 1799

Reid, Bell, Hutchings, Gaden, Phillips, Ogden, Skinner (St. John's)

Waldegrave

[enclosed with above] The church requires extra money as it nears completion. They cannot be made responsible for that. They thank the governor for using his influence in getting the funds for the church.

154

2 May 1800

Waldegrave (Portland Place)

Portland

The Lord Commissioners of the Admiralty are pulling Waldegrave from his duties. He requests that 200 pounds be sent to his successor for the Church in St. John's.

156-169

July 1800

Whitehall

Waldegrave

[enclosed with above] Directions regarding Mutiny and Conspiracy in the Newfoundland Regiment told by the Duke of Kent to Secretary Dundas. The guilty parties of the Military will be tried at a Court Martial. Waldegrave will be in charge of the Civil. The guilty of conspiracy should be tried under the Act of the 37th of George III for enticing H.M. forces to Mutiny. High Treason cases, you and the Chief Justice will bring them back to England. Instructions are given regarding the burial grounds. 200 pounds are allowed for the church.

161

2 July 1800

Rear Adm. Charles Morice Pole (Spithead)

D. of Portland

Acknowledges receipt of Portland's instructions and will try to do his best.

163

20 August 1800

Waldegrave (Portland Place)

Portland

Although he is not governor, the following should be made known to the Secretary of State.

165

5 July 1800

Governor Pole (Agincourt)

John King

[enclosed with above] Import of Provisions.

167-168v

2 July 1800

Judge Ogden (St. John's)

Waldegrave

[enclosed with above] Copy. Mutiny and riots. In February, threatening papers were posted in reaction to the proclamation relating to hogs. The courts offered a reward for the authors. Inhabitants also offered a reward. 40-50 officers deserted and threatened to kill anyone approaching them. 16 of them were taken, 3 spoke and implicated 20 more who had not deserted but had taken the Oaths of United Irishmen (Murphy). It is not known how far this Oath extended in the Regiment. General Skinner ordered a Court Martial. 5 were hanged at the Powder shed where they met, 7 sent to Halifax to be shot. The 66th regiment is now here. Some of the inhabitants are also guilty. There might be more plans to plunder and burn after the Ships of War leave for the winter. The security of the Island and of the fishery depends on Military Force. The 66th is not sufficient. The judge regrets that Waldegrave can't be here.

169-169v

14 August 1800

Governor Pole (Fort Townsend)

D. of Portland

Upon his arrival, all is perfectly quiet. He is showing the Agincourt to the people of Placentia. Fish are plentiful, the weather is nice, and the markets are promising.

171-171v

16 Nov. 1800

Pole (Spithead)

D. of Portland

Newfoundland is in perfect peace. The returns of the Fishery will be available when he comes to London.

173-174v

20 October

Pole (St. John's)

D. of Portland

Cover letter with supporting documents. He has paid the Officers (Sheriff excepted) of the Supreme Court. Andrew Maloney's salary was increased. He asks permission to increase the salaries of the Surrogates.

174v-176

20 October 1800

Governor Pole

The Treasury

[enclosed with above] Account of the salaries. Salaries of Routh, Maloney and Freeman.

177

21 October 1800

Rich Routh

Pole

[enclosed with above] Receipt of 300 pounds.

179

21 October 1800

Andrew Maloney

Pole

[enclosed with above] Receipt of 36 pounds.

181

20 October

Andrew Maloney

Pole

[enclosed with above] For the years 1798-1799, received 16 for arrears as Marshall.

183

20 October 1800

William Freeman

Pole

[enclosed with above] Receipt of 36 as Crier and Jailor.

185-185v

20 October 1800

Rich Routh (St. John's Courthouse)

Pole

[enclosed with above] Letter regarding the salary of the Marshall of the Court which was reduced by Waldegrave to 26 and later increased to 30 when it had been 36 in 1791. Please restore his salary to 36 and give him the arrears of 16.

187

20 October 1800

Rich Routh

 

[enclosed with above] Declaration attesting that the Fees received in the court amount to 276 and that Routh never took any of that money.

189v-190

20 October 1800

Pole

Treasury

[enclosed with above] Account of the salaries of the Judges, Magistrates and surrogates.

191

20 October 1800

Ogden

Pole

[enclosed with above] Receipt of 100 as Surrogate of St. John's and the Island. (Clerk included)

193

20 October 1800

Capt. Edgells

Pole

[enclosed with above] Receipt of 60 as Surrogate of the Island (Clerk included).

195

20 October 1800

Robert Carter

Pole

[enclosed with above] Receipt of 60 as Surrogate of Ferryland. (Clerk included)

197

20 October 1800

Charles Garland

J. Heffernan

Pole

[enclosed with above] Receipt of 60 as Surrogate of Harbour Grace (clerk included).

199

20 October 1800

Rev. Clinch

Pole

[enclosed with above] Receipt of 60 as Surrogate of Trinity, signed by agents to Rev. Clinch, Hart and Epps.

201

20 October 1800

David Brien

Pole

[enclosed with above] Receipt of 60 as Surrogate of Bonavista.

203

23 October 1800

C.M. Pole

D. of Portland

Cover letter and supporting documents. He has drawn 200 from the Treasury for the completion of the church at St. John's. The land for burial ground and instructions regarding plans and compensation.

204-206

11 October 1800

W. Carter, P.Hunter, J.Winter (St. John's)

Pole

[enclosed with above] Regarding the survey, dimensions (plans), value(122 10 shillings), occupants (Farrel, Ireland and Hanrahan, executors of the late John Livingstone).

207-210

18 October 1800

Carter, Hunter and Winter (St. John's)

Pole

[enclosed with above] Plan (p.208). APlan of a piece of ground, supposed an Equivalent to a space to be added to the churchyard.

211

23 October 1800

R. Reed (Treasurer)

Pole

[enclosed with above] receipt for 200 for the completion of the church.

213-217v

25 October 1800

Pole (St. John's)

D. of Portland

Extracts from the returns made to Pole by the Captains of the Men of War, employed as Surrogates. Placentia: reports of drunkenness but all good. Trinity: Rev. Clinch keeps everything happy. Fortune Bay: Complaints are too trifling to report. Trepassey and St. Mary's: Rev. Follett is sick and is not expected to recover. Sent the Trepassey to capture two or three Native Indians to civilize them but was unsuccessful. Furriers should be used, Roussel, Miller. Comments on the Irish and Catholics situation. The 66th regiment is formed of Catholics. All is well in Newfoundland. America and Newfoundland trade has increased. Goods are traded. Emigration to Boston is still happening. Population at St. John's has increased.

219

25 October 1800

Pole (St. John's)

D. of Portland

Cover letter and supporting documents. Regarding Brass and Iron Ordnance at St. John's and Placentia and the State of fortifications.

220v-221

8 August 1800

Cox

Pole

[enclosed with above] "Return of brass and iron ordnance mounted on different forts, batteries at St. John's and Placentia (Placentia as not yet arrived) Ammunition, Cartridges, Guns, etc."

222-223

20 October 1800

 

 

[enclosed with above] State of the fortifications.

The volume continues on Reel B-680 at p.223

223-224

20 October 1800

Skinner

Pole

[enclosed with above] State of the fortifications. Fort Williams, Signal Hill and heights...etc.

226-227

25 October 1800

Pole (St. John's)

D. of Portland

All supplies of fuel and candles were precluded from Government House by Kent, therefore he needs to be reimbursed for 16 at Fort Townsend.

228-228v

25 October 1800

Pole

D. of Portland

Regarding reimbursement of expenses incurred by Reverend Clinch at Trinity. A jail should be built there. Note: Mentions an enclosed letter by the Reverend which is missing.

230

25 October 1800

Pole

D. of Portland

Enclosed are the General Returns of the Imports and Exports for 1799-1800.

232-233

25 October 1800

Pole

D. of Portland

[enclosed with above] Abstract of the Imports and Exports from 1799-1800.

234

22 Nov. 1800

Pole (Chandes Street, Cavendish Sq.)

D. of Portland

Should the Duke require any more information on the forwarded paper, please ask.

236-236v

24 Nov. 1800

Pole (Chandes Street)

John King

Acknowledges the following: the Treasury contracted Paul LeMesurier to export 1900 barrels of flour to bring to the troops in Newfoundland in American bottoms. Pole will have to take measures to prevent any obstruction. Pole will be indemnified. He answers that he will do so.

238

11 Dec. 1800

Pole

D. of Portland

Acknowledges receipt of letter regarding the Union of the two kingdoms of Great Britain and Ireland. Flags Royal Arms, Standard, are annexed. He is instructed to take this in effect in his government.

240

"Newfoundland 1799-1800 Miscellaneous"

241-242

 

 Waldegrave

D. of Portland

State of the Fishery and Inhabitants of Newfoundland for 1798

243-259v

19 Nov. 1794

George the III and George Washington.

Governments

This is a printed document meant for publication. "Treaty of Amity, Commerce, and Navigation, between His Britannick Majesty and the United States of America" Printed by Edward Johnston, in Warwick-Lane. Signed at London. The document holds 28 articles, plus one additional article, and 33 pages. Signed by Grenville and John Jay. With a letter from Thomas Jefferson dated Sept. 5 1793. Official endorsements from George Washington and George the III.

260-261v

13 Jan. 1799

Graham (Hatton Garden)

(Missing encl.)

This is a letter by the secretary to the governor. It does not say for whom it is addressed. It seems to regard issues of Real Estate and Property Rights in Newfoundland. Mr Harris did not have the right to engage in fishery and hold the premises. Refers to an act of parliament stating that British subjects are allowed to erect "fishing conveniencies" on gardens or other grounds not used by the owner for the Fishery. Refers to Governor Elliott. A grant made to Saul.... If Mr. Harris' claim is granted, it will be disturbing to the whole island.

262

25 Jan. 1799

Rich Routh (Poole)

D. of Portland

Informs the Duke that he is in England.

264

25 Feb. 1799

Jeffery (St. Albans Street)

D. of Portland

Concerning Mr. Routh. Routh's health is bad and could he be allowed to stay in England until the business of the Island is settled.

266-267

23 Feb. 1799

Rich Routh

D. of Portland

The Chief Justice is oppressed with gout on feet, ankles and knees. He was told by Waldegrave, in the past, to return to Newfoundland or resign his commission. Routh has no intention of resigning (he has 17 years of good service) but his gout has been terrible. He asks if he could stay in England until May or June.

268

23 Feb. 1799

John Taylor, M.D. and Young West, Surgeon (Poole)

 

Certification of Routh's gout. Routh should be allowed to go to Bath to recuperate.

270

6 May 1799

Morice

 

Missionaries' salaries. Mr Dingle's case is still being determined.

272-274v

3 May 1799

John Dingle

Waldegrave

Petition of John Dingle. Dingle is a missionary and a physician. He provided services in the Bay of Bulls in 1774. Merchants and inhabitants wanted Dingle as their Magistrate. The French attack in 1796 and Dingle's part in it. He was taken prisoner on board the Jupiter. He claims to have stopped the destruction of more harbours. Dingle makes an account of all his losses and asks to be reimbursed. Note: Lots of details provided.

277-278v

20 May 1799

Ogden (St. John=s)

Waldegrave

Possibility of a vacancy in Newfoundland as Naval Officer. Mr. Buchans is sick and Judge Ogden is supervising the progress of his condition.

279-281

1 August 1799

Coffin (Portland Street)

D. of Portland

British vs American fishing rights . He was granted the Magdalen Islands by Lord Dorchester as recognition for his 27 years of service. 40 Acadian families were brought to settle there. Aks if he has exclusive fishing rights and to cultivate the soil without interruption from Treaties with the United States. (Mr Gridley from Boston was granted a fishing license there in 1763.)

Note: there is a portion of pencilled notes with different handwriting that is enlarged. The notes seem to indicate that the Americans have a right to fish on any part of the coast and that 40 families are not settled there.

283

3 August 1799

Coffin

King

Coffin sends in a note to request an answer from the Duke of Portland regarding the Magdalen Islands, as he is under orders to leave for Halifax.

285-287v

5 Nov. 1799

A. Lewis (Devon Place)

 

This is a hurried note without enclosure, marked "Private". It concerns the jurisdiction of Military and Civil government in Newfoundland and the various levels of responsibility. Relates to Prince Edward and a court martial that was not done in any judicial way.

286

24 October

R. B.

 

This note is sandwiched between pages of the previous letter. It does not bear an enclosure. And reads: "Dear Sir, May I beg the favour...to read at you leisure....and let me have your opinion....on the subject.

288

27 April 1795

George Beckwith, Adjt. General (Quebec)

Military commander in Newfoundland

Please forward the returns of the Newfoundland forces to Halifax so it can be sent to Headquarters along with the returns from Nova Scotia. The Commander in Chief is surprised that Returns have never been sent before.

290

17 August 1797

Thomas Skinner (Fort Williams)

Waldegrave

Concerns Issues of jurisdiction over the troops in Newfoundland. Needs to know if he is allowed to send the returns to Nova Scotia.

292-292v

17 August 1797

Waldegrave (Fort Townsend)

Skinner

Skinner is not to make Returns available to Prince Edward until Waldegrave receives instructions form England. Sir James Wallace never allowed Skinner to send returns to North America. Waldegrave believes that the troops in Nfld cannot be submitted to control in North America. If Skinner does not comply, he will bear the consequences.

294-295

17 August 1797

Skinner

Prince Edward

Extract of a letter concerning the issue of jurisdiction over the troops in Newfoundland. Skinner is placed in a bad situation and all of the officers, Major Charleton and Lieutenant Burton have seen his chagrin for not being able to send returns. The reason given to him by the Governor is that there are other companies of the second artillery doing duty in North America.

296-297v

24 August 1797

Prince Edward (Halifax)

Skinner

Reassures Skinner that in the interest of peace, he shall not interfere with the troops stationed in Newfoundland unless by command of Chief Governor Prescott, Duke of York (Secretary of State), or the Secretary of War. Skinner will undergo Court Martial if he disobeys orders that were passed through Edward by all the people mentioned above. If the Governor deviates from his civil duties, you are to report them to me. Send the Returns to me.

298-299v

28 August 1797

Prince Edward (Halifax)

Capt. Browning

Extract of a letter. Skinner left the Island under instructions of James Wallace. It is difficult for Skinner to govern the troops in Newfoundland because of the issue of jurisdiction. Ask the Duke of York to ask his Majesty to confirm if he is to continue to giver orders to the troops in Newfoundland.

301-302

20 Nov. 1799

John Bell (St. John=s)

John Jeffery

The land purchased from Thomas Babb (Horton and Lillie's plantation)adjacent to the church which Waldegrave wants to buy for the purpose of enlarging the burial grounds. The compensation offered by Waldegrave is poor. Also, the land is presently used for the Fishery with flakes.

303-304

12 Nov. 1799

Signed by approx. 25 petitioners. Here are a few: Butler, Williams, Murray, Elmes, Tremblett, Parker and Knight, Cormack, Hart and Eppes, Brien, Ougier...

 

Petition regarding the burial ground for the protestant church. Building on that land (Horton and Lillie's) would injure the fishery. There is better land available for the burial ground proper for burial.

305-306

30 April 1800

Thomas Tremblett Junior

William Adams

This concerns the Irish rebellion in the Newfoundland Regiment. Newfoundland needs better protection.

307-308

30 April 1800

Thomas Tremblett (St. John's)

Thomas Tremblett Senior (Dartmouth)

Irish rebellion. 10 escaped to the woods, the rest are being sent to Halifax. Extends guilt to all the Irish in the island. The Duke of Kent is expected. Pluto is gone on a cruise and 60-70 of best men are in Halifax. A frigate or a sloop of war is needed here in Winter and a sufficient naval force is needed in Summer.

309-310

2 May 1800

Thomas Tremblett (St. John=s)

Alex Lamb (Dartmouth, Devon)

Has the command on Signal Hill. Thorough and detailed account on causes, events of the Irish Rebellion/mutiny. Note: piece of letter torn on the last page.

311

5 June 1800

Smith (Hereford)

Alex Lamb (Darmouth, Devon)

Mr Archibald Buchanan, Naval Officer at Newfoundland died. Mr Peter McKie has replaced him.

313

June 1800

Davenport Gilpin (432 Strand)

Duke of Portland

Swords for the Non-Commissioned Officers and Drummers of the Royal Newfoundland Regiment to send to Newfoundland.

315-315v

17 June 1800

D=Ewes Coke (Poole)

Duke of Portland

Her requests that his last payment for his salary (300) be made to him as he had to quit his position of Chief Justice due to his poor health. His name did not get on the Civil list.

317-317v

4 July 1800

Rich Routh (Bath)

John King

He will leave for Portsmouth tomorrow.

319-321

7 August 1800

Rich Routh (St. John's)

Duke of Portland

Arrived in the Agincourt . Gives his account of the Irish rebellion/mutiny.

323-324

16 August 1800

Rich Routh (St. John's)

Duke of Portland

Copy of the above.

325-325v

17 August 1800

Rich Routh (St. John's)

John King

Thanks him again for his kindness. The tranquility in Newfoundland. Admiral Pole was good. The Pluto has brought in a Spanish prize of 30,000-40,000.

327

19 Nov. 1800

Lord Radstock (Portland Place)

Duke of Portland

The money for the Church in St. John's was used well.

329

23 October 1800

Skinner, Phillips, Hutchings, Reed, Harries, Ogden

Lord Radstock

Thanks for funding the Church in St. John's.

END